Science and Technology in World History

An Introduction

Author: James E. McClellan III

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 478

View: 313

Tracing historical relationship from the dawn of civilization through the twentieth century, the authors argue that technology as "applied science" emerged relatively, as industry and governments began funding scientific research. They explore the emergence of Europe and the United States as a scientific and technological power.

Science and Technology in World History, Volume 1

The Ancient World and Classical Civilization

Author: David Deming

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 275

View: 335

Science is a living, organic activity, the meaning and understanding of which have evolved incrementally over human history. This book, the first in a roughly chronological series, explores the development of the methodology and major ideas of science, in historical context, from ancient times to the decline of classical civilizations around 300 A.D. It includes details specific to the histories of specialized sciences including astronomy, medicine and physics—along with Roman engineering and Greek philosophy. It closely describes the contributions of such individuals as Pythagoras, Hippocrates, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Euclid, Archimedes, Ptolemy, Seneca, Pliny the Elder, and Galen.

Science and Technology in World History

An Introduction

Author: James Edward McClellan

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 404

View: 633

An introduction to the changing relationship between science and technology. Beginning with prehistoric man, and continuing their narrative through to NASA and modern medical research, the authors demonstrate that the tie between science and technology has not always been apparent.

Science and Technology in World History: The origin of chemistry, the principle of progress, the Enlightment and the Industrial Revolution

Author: David Deming

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page:

View: 946

Science is a living, organic activity, the meaning and understanding of which have evolved incrementally over human history. This volume, the first in a roughly chronological series, explores the development of the methodology and major ideas of science, in historical context, from ancient times to the decline of classical civilizations around 300 A.D. It includes details specific to the histories of specialized sciences including astronomy, medicine and physics, along with Roman engineering and Greek philosophy. It closely describes the contributions of such individuals as Pythagoras, Hippocrates, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Alexander the Great, Euclid, Archimedes, Ptolemy, Seneca, Pliny the Elder, and Galen. The second volume explores the evolution of science from the advents of Christianity and Islam through the Middle Ages, focusing especially on the historical relationship between science and religion. Specific topics include technological innovations during the Middle Ages; Islamic science; the Crusades; Gothic cathedrals; and the founding of Western universities. Close attention is given to such figures as Paul the Apostle, Hippolytus, Lactantius, Cyril of Alexandria, Hypatia, Cosmas Indicopleustes, and the Prophet Mohammed.

Science and Technology in World History, Volume 4

The Origin of Chemistry, the Principle of Progress, the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution

Author: David Deming

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 393

The history of science is a story of human discovery--intertwined with religion, philosophy, economics and technology. The fourth in a series, this book covers the beginnings of the modern world, when 16th-century Europeans began to realize that their scientific achievements surpassed those of the Greeks and Romans. Western Civilization organized itself around the idea that human technological and moral progress was achievable and desirable. Science emerged in 17th-century Europe as scholars subordinated reason to empiricism. Inspired by the example of physics, men like Robert Boyle began the process of changing alchemy into the exact science of chemistry. During the 18th century, European society became more secular and tolerant. Philosophers and economists developed many of the ideas underpinning modern social theories and economic policies. As the Industrial Revolution fundamentally transformed the world by increasing productivity, people became more affluent, better educated and urbanized, and the world entered an era of unprecedented prosperity and progress.

Science and Technology in World History, Volume 4

The Origin of Chemistry, the Principle of Progress, the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution

Author: David Deming

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 340

View: 325

The history of science is a story of human discovery--intertwined with religion, philosophy, economics and technology. The fourth in a series, this book covers the beginnings of the modern world, when 16th-century Europeans began to realize that their scientific achievements surpassed those of the Greeks and Romans. Western Civilization organized itself around the idea that human technological and moral progress was achievable and desirable. Science emerged in 17th-century Europe as scholars subordinated reason to empiricism. Inspired by the example of physics, men like Robert Boyle began the process of changing alchemy into the exact science of chemistry. During the 18th century, European society became more secular and tolerant. Philosophers and economists developed many of the ideas underpinning modern social theories and economic policies. As the Industrial Revolution fundamentally transformed the world by increasing productivity, people became more affluent, better educated and urbanized, and the world entered an era of unprecedented prosperity and progress.

Science and Technology in World History: The ancient world and classical civilization

Author: David Deming

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 508

Science is a living, organic activity, the meaning and understandng of which have evolved incementally over human history. This book, the second ni a roughly chronological series, explores the evolution of science from the advents of Christianity and Islam through the Middle Ages, focusing especially on the historical relationship between science and religion. Specfic topics include technological innovations during the Middle Ages; Islamic science; the Crusades; Gothic cathedrals; and the founding of Western universities. Close attentioni is given to such figures as Paul the Apostle, Hippolytus, Lactantius, Cyril of Alexandria, Hypatia, Cosmas Indicopleustes, and the Prophet Mohammed. --Book Jacket.

Science and Technology in World History, Volume 2

Early Christianity, the Rise of Islam and the Middle Ages

Author: David Deming

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 741

Science is a living, organic activity, the meaning and understanding of which have evolved incrementally over human history. This book, the second in a roughly chronological series, explores the evolution of science from the advents of Christianity and Islam through the Middle Ages, focusing especially on the historical relationship between science and religion. Specific topics include technological innovations during the Middle Ages; Islamic science; the Crusades; Gothic cathedrals; and the founding of Western universities. Close attention is given to such figures as Paul the Apostle, Hippolytus, Lactantius, Cyril of Alexandria, Hypatia, Cosmas Indicopleustes, and the Prophet Mohammed.