Science and Technology in Islam: The exact and natural sciences

Author: A. Y. Al-Hassan

Publisher: UNESCO

ISBN:

Category: Islam and science

Page: 527

View: 440

Research into Islamic science and technology is still in is early stages, but there is now sufficient material available for a preliminary study. Volume IV is intended to fill a gap which deserves a major multi-volume work. Part I is a review of the history of science in Islam. It deals with the contribution of Islamic civilization to mathematics, astronomy, and physics, which have long been acknowledged, but also advances made by Muslim scientitsts in the fields of cosmology, geology and mineralogy, zoology, veterinary science and botany.

Science and Technology in Islam: The exact and natural sciences

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Islam and science

Page:

View: 921

"Research into Islamic science is still in its early stages, but there is now sufficient material available for a preliminary study. This volume is intended to fill a gap which really deserves a major, multi-volume work. A short history of science in Islam is sketched out, including a look at technology and medicine, both fields of study which have been somewhat neglected. The contributions of Islamic civilisation to mathematics, astronomy and physics have long been acknowledged, but also recognised here are the advances made by Muslim scientists in the fields of cosmology, geology, mineralogy, zoology and botany. Historians of Islamic science tend to limit their studies to the period up to the sixteenth century, but this volume looks at how science and technology continued and flourished in the Ottoman Empire, Iran and India. Finally, the decline of Islamic science is discussed, and a look is taken at the state of science today and prospects for the future." (http://www.unesco.org/culture/aic/).

Medieval Science, Technology, and Medicine

An Encyclopedia

Author: Thomas F. Glick

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 966

Medieval Science, Technology, and Medicine details the whole scope of scientific knowledge in the medieval period in more than 300 A to Z entries. This resource discusses the research, application of knowledge, cultural and technology exchanges, experimentation, and achievements in the many disciplines related to science and technology. Coverage includes inventions, discoveries, concepts, places and fields of study, regions, and significant contributors to various fields of science. There are also entries on South-Central and East Asian science. This reference work provides an examination of medieval scientific tradition as well as an appreciation for the relationship between medieval science and the traditions it supplanted and those that replaced it. For a full list of entries, contributors, and more, visit the Routledge Encyclopedias of the Middle Ages website.

Routledge Revivals: Medieval Science, Technology and Medicine (2006)

An Encyclopedia

Author: Thomas F. Glick

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 200

First published in 2005, this encyclopedia demonstrates that the millennium from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance was a period of great intellectual and practical achievement and innovation. In Europe, the Islamic world, South and East Asia, and the Americas, individuals built on earlier achievements, introduced sometimes radical refinements and laid the foundations for modern development. Medieval Science, Technology, and Medicine details the whole scope of scientific knowledge in the medieval period in more than 300 A to Z entries. This comprehensive resource discusses the research, application of knowledge, cultural and technology exchanges, experimentation, and achievements in the many disciplines related to science and technology. It also looks at the relationship between medieval science and the traditions it supplanted. Written by a select group of international scholars, this reference work will be of great use to scholars, students, and general readers researching topics in many fields, including medieval studies, world history, history of science, history of technology, history of medicine, and cultural studies.

Islamic Science and the Making of the European Renaissance

Author: George Saliba

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 328

View: 759

The rise and fall of the Islamic scientific tradition, and the relationship of Islamic science to European science during the Renaissance. The Islamic scientific tradition has been described many times in accounts of Islamic civilization and general histories of science, with most authors tracing its beginnings to the appropriation of ideas from other ancient civilizations—the Greeks in particular. In this thought-provoking and original book, George Saliba argues that, contrary to the generally accepted view, the foundations of Islamic scientific thought were laid well before Greek sources were formally translated into Arabic in the ninth century. Drawing on an account by the tenth-century intellectual historian Ibn al-Naidm that is ignored by most modern scholars, Saliba suggests that early translations from mainly Persian and Greek sources outlining elementary scientific ideas for the use of government departments were the impetus for the development of the Islamic scientific tradition. He argues further that there was an organic relationship between the Islamic scientific thought that developed in the later centuries and the science that came into being in Europe during the Renaissance. Saliba outlines the conventional accounts of Islamic science, then discusses their shortcomings and proposes an alternate narrative. Using astronomy as a template for tracing the progress of science in Islamic civilization, Saliba demonstrates the originality of Islamic scientific thought. He details the innovations (including new mathematical tools) made by the Islamic astronomers from the thirteenth to sixteenth centuries, and offers evidence that Copernicus could have known of and drawn on their work. Rather than viewing the rise and fall of Islamic science from the often-narrated perspectives of politics and religion, Saliba focuses on the scientific production itself and the complex social, economic, and intellectual conditions that made it possible.

Islam, Authoritarianism, and Underdevelopment

A Global and Historical Comparison

Author: Ahmet T. Kuru

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 758

Analyzes Muslim countries' contemporary problems, particularly violence, authoritarianism, and underdevelopment, comparing their historical levels of development with Western Europe.

Founding Gods, Inventing Nations

Conquest and Culture Myths from Antiquity to Islam

Author: William F. McCants

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 179

View: 429

From the dawn of writing in Sumer to the sunset of the Islamic empire, Founding Gods, Inventing Nations traces four thousand years of speculation on the origins of civilization. Investigating a vast range of primary sources, some of which are translated here for the first time, and focusing on the dynamic influence of the Greek, Roman, and Arab conquests of the Near East, William McCants looks at the ways the conquerors and those they conquered reshaped their myths of civilization's origins in response to the social and political consequences of empire. The Greek and Roman conquests brought with them a learned culture that competed with that of native elites. The conquering Arabs, in contrast, had no learned culture, which led to three hundred years of Muslim competition over the cultural orientation of Islam, a contest reflected in the culture myths of that time. What we know today as Islamic culture is the product of this contest, whose protagonists drew heavily on the lore of non-Arab and pagan antiquity. McCants argues that authors in all three periods did not write about civilization's origins solely out of pure antiquarian interest--they also sought to address the social and political tensions of the day. The strategies they employed and the postcolonial dilemmas they confronted provide invaluable context for understanding how authors today use myth and history to locate themselves in the confusing aftermath of empire.

The Bright Dark Ages

Comparative and Connective Perspectives

Author: Arun Bala

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 302

View: 976

The European 'dark ages' in the millennium 500 to 1500 CE was a bright age of brilliant scientific achievements in China, India and the Middle East. The contributors to this volume address its implications for comparative and connective science studies.

Baghdad and Isfahan

A Dialogue of Two Cities in an Age of Science CA. 750-1750

Author: Elaheh Kheirandish

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 296

View: 872

Renowned as great centres of learning, the cities of Baghdad and Isfahan were at the heart of the Islamic civilization as rich capital cities and centres of intellectual thought. Their distinct cultural voices inspired a unique historical dialogue, which finds new expression in Baghdad and Isfahan, the story of how knowledge was transmitted and transformed within Islamic lands, and then spread across Europe. Capturing the history of Baghdad and Isfahan from 750 to 1750, Elaheh Kheirandish draws on the voices of court astronomers, mathematicians, scientists, mystics, jurists, statesmen and Arabic and Persian translators and scholars to document the extensive and lasting contribution of sciences from Islamic lands to the history of science. Kheirandish bases her narrative on a unique medieval manuscript and other historical sources and the result is more than a thousand-year 'tale of two cities' – it is a city by city, and century by century, look at what it took to change the world. In a feat of travelogue and time travel, this unique book creates parallel stories with modern and historical characters, crossing cities worldwide, and capturing changes through time. Interweaving multiple narratives, histories, and futures, she charts the possible paths – formalized and serendipitous, lost and recovered – by which knowledge itself is translated and transmitted across time and cultures.

Making Sense of Health, Disease, and the Environment in Cross-Cultural History: The Arabic-Islamic World, China, Europe, and North America

Author: Florence Bretelle-Establet

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 378

View: 363

This book has been defined around three important issues: the first sheds light on how people, in various philosophical, religious, and political contexts, understand the natural environment, and how the relationship between the environment and the body is perceived; the second focuses on the perceptions that a particular natural environment is good or bad for human health and examines the reasons behind such characterizations ; the third examines the promotion, in history, of specific practices to take advantage of the health benefits, or avoid the harm, caused by certain environments and also efforts made to change environments supposed to be harmful to human health. The feeling and/or the observation that the natural environment can have effects on human health have been, and are still commonly shared throughout the world. This led us to raise the issue of the links observed and believed to exist between human beings and the natural environment in a broad chronological and geographical framework. In this investigation, we bring the reader from ancient and late imperial China to the medieval Arab world up to medieval, modern, and contemporary Europe. This book does not examine these relationships through the prism of the knowledge of our modern contemporary European experience, which, still too often, leads to the feeling of totally different worlds. Rather, it questions protagonists who, in different times and in different places, have reflected, on their own terms, on the links between environment and health and tries to obtain a better understanding of why these links took the form they did in these precise contexts. This book targets an academic readership as well as an “informed audience”, for whom present issues of environment and health can be nourished by the reflections of the past.

The New Cambridge History of Islam: Volume 4, Islamic Cultures and Societies to the End of the Eighteenth Century

Author: Robert Irwin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 888

Robert Irwin's authoritative introduction to the fourth volume of The New Cambridge History of Islam offers a panoramic vision of Islamic culture from its origins to around 1800. The introductory chapter, which highlights key developments and introduces some of Islam's most famous protagonists, paves the way for an extraordinarily varied collection of essays. The themes treated include religion and law, conversion, Islam's relationship with the natural world, governance and politics, caliphs and kings, philosophy, science, medicine, language, art, architecture, literature, music and even cookery. What emerges from this rich collection, written by an international team of experts, is the diversity and dynamism of the societies which created this flourishing civilization. Volume four of The New Cambridge History of Islam serves as a thematic companion to the three preceding, politically oriented volumes, and in coverage extends across the pre-modern Islamic world.

Encyclopaedia of the History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Non-Western Cultures

Author: Helaine Selin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 2415

View: 305

Here, at last, is the massively updated and augmented second edition of this landmark encyclopedia. It contains approximately 1000 entries dealing in depth with the history of the scientific, technological and medical accomplishments of cultures outside of the United States and Europe. The entries consist of fully updated articles together with hundreds of entirely new topics. This unique reference work includes intercultural articles on broad topics such as mathematics and astronomy as well as thoughtful philosophical articles on concepts and ideas related to the study of non-Western Science, such as rationality, objectivity, and method. You’ll also find material on religion and science, East and West, and magic and science.

A Descriptive Catalogue of Indian Astronomical Instruments

Abridged Version

Author: Sreeramula Rajeswara Sarma

Publisher: tredition

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 656

View: 231

The large masonry instruments designed by Sawai Jai Singh and erected in his five observatories in the early eighteenth century mark the culmination of a long process of development in astronomical instrumentation. But what kind of astronomical instruments were used in India before Jai Singh’s time? Sanskrit texts on astronomy describe the construction and use of several types of instruments. Are any of these extant in museums? Such questions led me to an exploration of nearly a hundred museums and private collections in India, Europe and USA for about a quarter century. The present catalogue is the outcome of this exploration. This catalogue describes each instrument in the context of the related extant specimens, while laying special emphasis on the interplay between Sanskrit and Islamic traditions of instrumentation. Therefore, each instrument type is organized in a separate section identified by the letters of the alphabet. These sections begin with introductory essays on the history of the instrument type and its varieties, followed by a full technical description of every specimen, with art historical notes. Moreover, all engraved data are reproduced and interpreted as far as possible. In some 4300 pages, it contains 600 entries, with introductory essays and long extracts from two important Sanskrit texts, namely Mahendra Sūri’s Yantrarāja and Padmanābha’s Dhruvabhramādhikāra, along with English translations. Following a suggestion that a shorter version of the Catalogue, consisting of all the introductory essays and appendices, but excluding the catalogue proper, would be easier for the general reader to handle, this Abridged Version has been prepared. The pagination here remains the same as in the Catalogue. Those who wish to read about individual instruments can always consult the Catalogue.

Science and Islam

Author: Muẓaffar Iqbāl

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 233

View: 189

Provides a clear, authentic, and scholarly account of the various aspects of the relationship between Islam and science

Interpreting Avicenna: Science and Philosophy in Medieval Islam

Proceedings of the Second Conference of the Avicenna Study Group

Author: Jon McGinnis

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 901

The work treats various aspects of Avicennan philosophy and science. The topics include methods for establishing an authentic Avicenna corpus, natural philosophy and science, theology and metaphysics and Avicenna's subsequent historical influence.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam

Author: Salim Ayduz

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 1152

View: 172

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam provides both an overview and a comprehensive and detailed survey of the main features of philosophy, science, medicine and technology in the Muslim world. The level of entries are scholarly, based on primary and secondary sources, and aimed at advanced students of Islamic philosophy and science. The selection of entries as well as their content reflect the highest academic standards and most recent research in the field, providing scholars and advanced students with in-depth surveys on the most important issues in the study of these topics, serving as the authoritative reference work on this important area of research.

Science and Medicine: Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Author: Oxford University Press

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 40

View: 739

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of Islamic studies find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated related. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In Islamic studies, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is a static version of an article from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Islamic Studies, a dynamic, continuously updated, online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of the Islamic religion and Muslim cultures. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.

New Perspectives on the History of Islamic Science

Volume 3

Author: Muzaffar Iqbal

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 570

View: 785

Recent studies in the history of Islamic science based on the discovery and study of new primary texts and instruments have substantially revised the views of nineteenth-century historians of science. This volume presents some of these ground-breaking studies as well as articles which shed new light on the ongoing academic debate surrounding the question of the decline of Islamic scientific tradition.