Science and Islam (Icon Science)

A History

Author: Ehsan Masood

Publisher: Icon Science

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 251

Long before the European Enlightenment, scholars and researchers working from Samarkand in modern-day Uzbekistan to Cordoba in Spain advanced our knowledge of astronomy, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, medicine and philosophy. From Musa al-Khwarizmi who developed algebra in 9th century Baghdad to al-Jazari, a 13th-century Turkish engineer whose achievements include the crank, the camshaft and the reciprocating piston, Ehsan Masood tells the amazing story of one of history’s most misunderstood yet rich and fertile periods in science, via the scholars, research, and science of the Islamic empires of the middle ages.

Science and Islam (Icon Science)

A History

Author: Ehsan Masood

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 650

Long before the European Enlightenment, scholars and researchers working from Samarkand in modern-day Uzbekistan to Cordoba in Spain advanced our knowledge of astronomy, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, medicine and philosophy. From Musa al-Khwarizmi who developed algebra in 9th century Baghdad to al-Jazari, a 13th-century Turkish engineer whose achievements include the crank, the camshaft and the reciprocating piston, Ehsan Masood tells the amazing story of one of history’s most misunderstood yet rich and fertile periods in science, via the scholars, research, and science of the Islamic empires of the middle ages.

Science & Islam

A History

Author: Ehsan Masood

Publisher: Icon Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 246

View: 948

From Musa al-Khwarizmi who developed algebra in 9th century Baghdad to al-Jazari, a 13th-century Turkish engineer whose achievements include the crank, the camshaft and the reciprocating piston, Science and Islam tells the story of one of history’s most misunderstood yet rich and fertile periods in science: the extraordinary Islamic scientific revolution between 700 and 1400 CE.

Science

A Four Thousand Year History

Author: Patricia Fara

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 408

View: 235

In Science, Patricia Fara rewrites science's past to provide new ways of understanding and questioning our modern technological society. Aiming not just to provide information but to make people think, this unique book explores how science has become so powerful by describing the financial interests and imperial ambitions behind its success. Sweeping through the centuries from ancient Babylon right up to the latest hi-tech experiments in genetics and particle physics, Fara's book also ranges internationally, challenging notions of European superiority by emphasising the importance of scientific projects based around the world, including revealing discussions of China and the Islamic Empire alongside the more familiar stories about Copernicus's sun-centered astronomy, Newton's gravity, and Darwin's theory of evolution. We see for instance how Muslim leaders encouraged science by building massive libraries, hospitals, and astronomical observatories and we rediscover the significance of medieval Europe--long overlooked--where, surprisingly, religious institutions ensured science's survival, as the learning preserved in monasteries was subsequently developed in new and unique institutions: universities. Instead of focussing on esoteric experiments and abstract theories, she explains how science belongs to the practical world of war, politics and business. And rather than glorifying scientists as idealized heroes, she tells true stories about real people--men (and some women) who needed to earn their living, who made mistakes, and who trampled down their rivals. Finally, this provocative volume challenges scientific supremacy itself, arguing that science is successful not because it is always indubitably right, but because people have said that it is right. Science dominates modern life, but perhaps the globe will be better off by limiting science's powers and undoing some of its effects. "Dismantling popular myths, taking a truly global view and dispensing with false idols, Fara's highly readable survey of science's histories is a breath of fresh air. She unerringly pinpoints the defining moods of each age, treating the past with respect and the present with discernment. This wonderfully literate book tells a story that is far, far more interesting than the tidy fictions of hindsight." -- Philip Ball, Consultant Editor of Nature "It's been a very long time since any reputable historian of science had the desire, the knowledge, or the nerve to undertake a book like this-- an attempt to survey the development of science from Antiquity to the present, notably including non-European materials. Patricia Fara has succeeded: Science is an elegant and compact creative synthesis of the piecemeal researches of generations of academic historians. It deserves the widest possible readership." - Steven Shapin, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard, and author of The Scientific Revolution Patricia Fara lectures in the History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge and is the Senior Tutor of Clare College. She is the author of numerous books, including Fatal Attraction: Magnetic Mysteries of the Enlightenment and Newton: The Making of Genius. Her writing has appeared in History Today, New Scientist, Nature, The Times and New Statesman, and she writes a regular column on scientific portraits for Endeavour. Books by the same author Fatal Attraction: Magnetic Mysteries of the Enlightenment by Patricia Fara. Published: 2005 Publisher: Icon Books Price: L9.99 Pandora's Breeches: Women, Science and Power in the Enlightenment by Patricia Fara. Published: 2004 Publisher: Pimlico Price: L12.99 Sex, Botany and Empire; the Stories of Carl Linnaeus and Joseph Banks by Patricia Fara. Published: 2003 Publisher: Icon Books Price: L6.99 Newton: the Making of Genius by Patricia Fara. Published: 2002 Publisher: Macmillan Price: L20 An Entertainment for Angels: Electricity in the Enlightenment by Patricia Fara. Publish

GDP

The World’s Most Powerful Formula and Why it Must Now Change

Author: Ehsan Masood

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 304

View: 368

A highly topical look at the formula that dominates economics, and why it has outlived its usefulness. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is the world’s economic health-check, an influential ranking of global prosperity. A rising number is manna for markets and keeps business buzzing; a falling one is a portent of doom for everyone. But, as science writer Ehsan Masood deftly shows, GDP can be unforgiving for those countries that cannot be – or choose not to be – measured by its rules. And it fails to measure much of what is really important to our lives. GDP was created to help Western economies rebuild after the horrors of the Great Depression and to rise again from the fires of the Second World War. But it simultaneously rewarded decades of environmental destruction, and now, amid an unprecedented economic crisis, it faces a fight for its survival. What began as a useful formula to assess a country’s path to prosperity, has trapped societies and leaders into a system of measurement from which the world has to break free. We must, and this book shows how we can.

Thomas Kuhn and the Science Wars

Author: Ziauddin Sardar

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 76

View: 627

Rather than a neutral value-free quest for "Truth", Thomas Kuhn reduced science to puzzle-solving within belief systems. This introduction provides an analysis of the conflict and shows how science has become a contested cultural symbol.

The Genesis of Science

How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution

Author: James Hannam

Publisher: Regnery Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 735

Maybe the Dark Ages Weren’t So Dark Afterall… Here are some facts you probably didn’t learn in school: People in the Middle Ages did not think the world was flat—in fact, medieval scholars could prove it wasn’t The Inquisition never executed anyone because of their scientific ideas or discoveries (actually, the Church was the chief sponsor of scientific research and several popes were celebrated for their knowledge of the subject) It was medieval scientific discoveries, methods, and principles that made possible western civilization’s “Scientific Revolution” If you were taught that the Middle Ages were a time of intellectual stagnation, superstition, and ignorance, you were taught a myth that has been utterly refuted by modern scholarship. As a physicist and historian of science James Hannam shows in his brilliant new book, The Genesis of Science: How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution, without the scholarship of the “barbaric” Middle Ages, modern science simply would not exist. The Middle Ages were a time of one intellectual triumph after another. As Dr. Hannam writes, “The people of medieval Europe invented spectacles, the mechanical clock, the windmill, and the blast furnace by themselves. Lenses and cameras, almost all kinds of machinery, and the industrial revolution itself all owe their origins to the forgotten inventors of the Middle Ages.” In The Genesis of Science you will discover Why the scientific accomplishments of the Middle Ages far surpassed those of the classical world How medieval craftsmen and scientists not only made discoveries of their own, but seized upon Eastern inventions—printing, gunpowder, and the compass—and improved them beyond the dreams of their originators How Galileo’s notorious trial before the Inquisition was about politics, not science Why the theology of the Catholic Church, far from being an impediment, led directly to the development of modern science Provocative, engaging, and a terrific read, James Hannam’s Genesis of Science will change the way you think about our past—and our future.

Eureka! (Icon Science)

The Birth of Science

Author: Andrew Gregory

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 192

View: 989

Medicine, anatomy, astronomy, mathematics and cosmology, science began with the Greeks, and Plato, Aristotle, Pythagoras, Archimedes and Hippocrates were amongst its stars. That man ever managed to develop a 'scientific' attitude to the natural world at all is one of the true wonders of human thought. Eureka! shows how, free from intellectual and religious dogma, these early thinkers rejected myths and capricious gods and, in distinguishing between the natural and supernatural, effectively discovered nature. Andrew Gregory, Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at University College London, unravels the genesis of science in this fascinating exploration of the origins of Western civilisation, and our desire for a rational, legitimating system of the world.

God's Philosophers

How the Medieval World Laid the Foundations of Modern Science

Author: James Hannam

Publisher: Icon Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 531

This is a powerful and a thrilling narrative history revealing the roots of modern science in the medieval world. The adjective 'medieval' has become a synonym for brutality and uncivilized behavior. Yet without the work of medieval scholars there could have been no Galileo, no Newton and no Scientific Revolution. In "God's Philosophers", James Hannam debunks many of the myths about the Middle Ages, showing that medieval people did not think the earth is flat, nor did Columbus 'prove' that it is a sphere; the Inquisition burnt nobody for their science nor was Copernicus afraid of persecution; no Pope tried to ban human dissection or the number zero. "God's Philosophers" is a celebration of the forgotten scientific achievements of the Middle Ages - advances which were often made thanks to, rather than in spite of, the influence of Christianity and Islam. Decisive progress was also made in technology: spectacles and the mechanical clock, for instance, were both invented in thirteenth-century Europe. Charting an epic journey through six centuries of history, "God's Philosophers" brings back to light the discoveries of neglected geniuses like John Buridan, Nicole Oresme and Thomas Bradwardine, as well as putting into context the contributions of more familiar figures like Roger Bacon, William of Ockham and Saint Thomas Aquinas.

Turing and the Universal Machine (Icon Science)

The Making of the Modern Computer

Author: Jon Agar

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 75

View: 173

The history of the computer is entwined with that of the modern world and most famously with the life of one man, Alan Turing. How did this device, which first appeared a mere 50 years ago, come to structure and dominate our lives so totally? An enlightening mini-biography of a brilliant but troubled man.

ICON-ISHIC 2020

Proceedings of the First International Conference on Islamic History and Civilization, ICON-ISHIC 2020, 14 October, Semarang, Indonesia

Author: Hamdan Hadi Kusuma

Publisher: European Alliance for Innovation

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 364

View: 679

The 1th International Conference on Islamics History and Civilization (ICON-ISHIC 2020) is organized by the Research Institutions and Community Service Universitas Islam Negeri Walisongo Semarang. The aims of the conference are to provide a platform to the researchers, experts, and practitioners from academia, to discover, develop and abstract the understanding of the position of Muslims in the global context; To Critically evaluate the identity of the Muslims in the Globalized World in its integration and contribution; To examine and criticise various forms of expression and articulation of Islam in its relevance in the development of society; To review the relation and significance of the discourse and practice of Islam in combating radicalism; To understand and map the danger of environmental degradation as well as further align and promote on conserving the environment; To explore and seek the reinterpretation of Gender Role in the light of Quranic Interpretation in the field of mathematics, science education and environment studies.

Contemporary Issues in Islam and Science

Volume 2

Author: Muzaffar Iqbal

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 520

View: 147

The articles selected for this volume explore emergent issues in the contemporary relationship between Islam and science and present studies of eight major voices in the discourse. Also included is a section on the operationalization of Islamic science in the modern world and a section on studies in traditional Islamic cosmology.

A Charm of Magpies

An ebook bundle of The Science Magpie, The Antiques Magpie and The Nature Magpie

Author: Simon Flynn

Publisher: Icon Books

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 736

View: 188

The Science Magpie is Simon Flynn’s bestselling collection of enthralling facts, stories, poems and more from science’s history, from the Large Hadron Collider rap to the sins of Isaac Newton. With Antiques Roadshow regular Marc Allum as your guide, go in search of stolen masterpieces, explore the first museums, learn the secrets of the forgers and brush up on your auction technique with The Antiques Magpie. And with acclaimed nature writer Daniel Allen, join naturalists, novelists and poets as they explore the most isolated parts of the planet and discover which plants can be used to predict the weather in The Nature Magpie.

The Genesis of Science

How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution

Author: James Hannam

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 854

The Not-So-Dark Dark Ages What they forgot to teach you in school: People in the Middle Ages did not think the world was flat The Inquisition never executed anyone because of their scientific ideologies It was medieval scientific discoveries, including various methods, that made possible Western civilization’s “Scientific Revolution” As a physicist and historian of science James Hannam debunks myths of the Middle Ages in his brilliant book The Genesis of Science: How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution. Without the medieval scholars, there would be no modern science. Discover the Dark Ages and their inventions, research methods, and what conclusions they actually made about the shape of the world.

Voices of Islam: Voices of art, beauty, and science

Author: Vincent J. Cornell

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Islam

Page: 224

View: 848

Provides a wide depiction of Islamic doctrines, practices, and worldviews. Some 50 articles by scholars that are also practicing Muslims representing a diverse range of places, traditions, cultures, and beliefs are presented in volumes that individually address the grand traditions and beliefs of the religion; the spiritual experience of Islam; everyday experiences of family, home, and society; Islamic cultures' art, aesthetics, and science; and Muslim progressives, modernists, and other reformers.

A History of Science in Society

From Philosophy to Utility, Second Edition

Author: Lesley Cormack

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 139

A History of Science in Society is a concise overview that introduces complex ideas in a non-technical fashion. Andrew Ede and Lesley B. Cormack trace the history of science through its continually changing place in society and explore the link between the pursuit of knowledge and the desire to make that knowledge useful. In this edition, the authors examine the robust intellectual exchange between East and West and provide new discussions of two women in science: Maria Merian and Maria Winkelmann. A chapter on the relationship between science and war has been added as well as a section on climate change. The further readings section has been updated to reflect recent contributions to the field. Other new features include timelines at the end of each chapter, 70 upgraded illustrations, and new maps of Renaissance Europe, Captain James Cook's voyages, the 2nd voyage of the Beagle, and the main war front during World War I.

A History of Science in Society

From Philosophy to Utility, Third Edition

Author: Andrew Ede

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 199

"An update of the popular overview, A History of Science in Society traces the development of scientific thought throughout the ages. Beginning with the philosophy of the Ancient Greeks and Romans and proceeding through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and through to the present-day, the book presents key developments in scientific thought and theory. The new edition includes more material on non-Western science; new material on ethics, climate change, and corporate science in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; more than 90 illustrations; updated timelines; and study questions designed to guide students."--

A History of Science in Society, Volume I

From the Ancient Greeks to the Scientific Revolution, Third Edition

Author: Andrew Ede

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 192

View: 308

A History of Science in Society is a concise overview that introduces complex ideas in a non-technical fashion. Ede and Cormack trace the history of the changing place of science in society and explore the link between the pursuit of knowledge and the desire to make that knowledge useful. Volume I covers the origins of natural philosophy in the ancient world to the Scientific Revolution. New topics in this edition include astronomy and mathematics in ancient Mayan society, science and technology in ancient India and China, and Islamic cartography. New "Connections" features provide in-depth exploration of the ways science and society interconnect. The text is accompanied by 27 colour maps and diagrams, and 4 colour plates highlighting key concepts and events. Essay questions, chapter timelines, a further readings section, and an index provide additional support for students. A companion reader edited by the authors, A History of Science in Society: A Reader, is also available.

Principles of Neurotheology

Author: Assoc Prof Andrew B Newberg

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 286

View: 883

"Neurotheology" has garnered substantial attention in the academic and lay communities in recent years. Several books have been written addressing the relationship between the brain and religious experience and numerous scholarly articles have been published on the topic, some in the popular press. The scientific and religious communities have been very interested in obtaining more information regarding neurotheology, how to approach this topic, and how science and religion can be integrated in some manner that preserves both. If neurotheology is to be considered a viable field going forward, it requires a set of clear principles that can be generally agreed upon and supported by both the theological or religious perspective and the scientific one as well. Principles of Neurotheology sets out the necessary principles of neurotheology which can be used as a foundation for future neurotheological discourse. Laying the groundwork for a new synthesis of scientific and theological dialogue, this book proposes that neurotheology, a term fraught with potential problems, is a highly useful and important voice in the greater study of religious and theological ideas and their intersection with science.