Satellite Beacons Observations from 1964 to 1970

Author: G. K. Hartmann

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 98

View: 351

From October 1964 to May 1969 the 40 MHz, 41 MHz, and 360 MHz signals of the satellite Explo 0 0 rer 22, were recorded at Lindau (51,650 N; 10,125 E). The Faraday effect recordings at 40 MHz and 41 MHz and Dispersive-Doppler-effect recordings at 40 MHz and 360 MHz were used to calculate the ionospheric electron content up to 1000 km. The mean electron content for 1 hour periods over a period 0 of three months as obtained at 51. 6 N geographic latitude as derived from various evaluation methods is presented. Furthermore, the relevant critical frequency FOF2 is displayed. A similar presentation was chosen for the calculated slabthickness data. For one specific case the daily variation of the electron con tent as determined by measurements was compared with a relevant theoretical curve. The agreement, was fairly good. Due to technical problems the beacons were switched off in 1969. Now the five orbiting FS-NNSS satellites provide a good possibility to determine the ionospheric electron content up to 1100 km fairly accurately by evaluating the Dispersive Doppler recordings obtained at 150 MHz and 400 MHz. The amplitude recordings of the 40 MHz and 41 MHz signals of Explorer 22 were furthermore used for amplitude scintillation studies. Simultaneous Dispersive-Doppler-recordings enabled in part also pha se scintillation studies. Phase and amplitude recordings were compared.

Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports

Author:

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Category: Aeronautics

Page:

View: 587

Lists citations with abstracts for aerospace related reports obtained from world wide sources and announces documents that have recently been entered into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Database.

The Southern Boundary Region of the Winter Anomaly in Ionospheric Absorption in Winter 1971/72 Observed on Board the Cargo Vessel “Hanau” of Hapag-Lloyd Moving between 10° and 55° N

Author: W. Barke

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 36

View: 410

In the period 28 November 1971 to 12 February 1972. during three passages of the North Atlantic. the diurnal variation of ionospheric absorption L was measured by method Al at 1. 7 and 5. 0 MHz as a function of geographic and geomagnetic parameters. The measurements were carried out. applying a new equipment especially designed for mobile expeditions. on board a cargo vessel (mv "Hanau" of Hapag 0 0 0 0 -Lloyd) moving between Hamburg (53 N; 10 E) and La Guaira (11 N; 67 W). Simultaneously. in the framework of the European Cooperation on Winter Anomaly studies. measurements of absorption were made at various other locations and the data used as a basis for comparison [circuits Norddeich-Lindau 0 0 0 0 (A3; 2. 61 MHz; 52. 6 N; 8. 7 E) and Aranjuez-Balerma (A3; 2. 83 MHz; 38. 6 N; 5. 2 W). station Lan 0 0 caster (AI; 2. 14 MHz; 53 52' N; 2 45' W) 1 . Aboard. the diurnal variation of absorption showed large modifications from day to day. The behaviour of L (cos X = 0. 2) waS somewhat different at each passage 0 0 but showed a common trend: The winter anomaly vanished in a transit zone between 34 and 44 N cen 0 tered at about 39 N; the same was true for the behaviour of L (cos X = 1).

STAR

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Category: Aeronautics

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View: 966

Thermospheric Winds and Their Influence on the Ionosphere

(Review)

Author: R. Rüster

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 27

View: 172

It is well known that thermospheric winds play an important role in the dynamics of the upper atmo sphere and are of major importance for the behaviour of the ionosphere. The methods of calculating these winds are discussed briefly. Comparisons of the calculated winds with observational data are carried out. Some main effects of the winds on the dynamical behaviour of the ionized as well as neutral part of the upper atmosphere are discussed. 2. Calculation of thermospheric winds The system of equations describing the dynamical behaviour of the thermosphere and the ionosphere consists of: b a neutral atmosphere ionosphere continuity equations continuity equations for different ion species and electrons equations of motion (winds) equations of motion for the different constituents (ambi polar diffusion, wind induced drifts, ~ x ~ -drifts) energy balance equations energy balance equations Due to collisions between charged and neutral particles there is an interaction between the ionized and neutral gas. Both sets of equations are coupled, therefore, by the respective drag terms. Because of the complexity of the mathematics involved in solving all equations simultaneously, different approaches have been made to solve parts of this system of differential equations under additional assumptions and restrictions. There are two general approaches: a. ) Solution of the equation of motion of the neutral atmosphere together with the ionospheric continuity equations and equations of motion of the ions.

Thermospheric Winds and Their Influence on the Ionosphere

(review)

Author: Rüdiger Rüster

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Electronic books

Page: 21

View: 495

It is well known that thermospheric winds play an important role in the dynamics of the upper atmo sphere and are of major importance for the behaviour of the ionosphere. The methods of calculating these winds are discussed briefly. Comparisons of the calculated winds with observational data are carried out. Some main effects of the winds on the dynamical behaviour of the ionized as well as neutral part of the upper atmosphere are discussed. 2. Calculation of thermospheric winds The system of equations describing the dynamical behaviour of the thermosphere and the ionosphere consists of: b a neutral atmosphere ionosphere continuity equations continuity equations for different ion species and electrons equations of motion (winds) equations of motion for the different constituents (ambi polar diffusion, wind induced drifts, ~ x ~ -drifts) energy balance equations energy balance equations Due to collisions between charged and neutral particles there is an interaction between the ionized and neutral gas. Both sets of equations are coupled, therefore, by the respective drag terms. Because of the complexity of the mathematics involved in solving all equations simultaneously, different approaches have been made to solve parts of this system of differential equations under additional assumptions and restrictions. There are two general approaches: a.) Solution of the equation of motion of the neutral atmosphere together with the ionospheric continuity equations and equations of motion of the ions.