Carlyle and Jean Paul: Their Spiritual Optics

Author: J.P. Vijn

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 284

View: 632

It has always been thought difficult, if not impossible, to define what the philosophy of Carlyle was. Ever since the publication of Sartor Resartus in 1833-1834, the view that Carlyle had a theistic conception of the universe has been defended as well as opposed. At a time, therefore, when Carlyle’s work as a whole is being reappraised, his philosophy should first and foremost be dealt with. Carlyle’s life-philosophy is based on the inner experience of a process of ‘conversion’, which set in with an incident that occurred to him at Leith Walk, Edinburgh. This study – which settles the old question of the date of the incident – demonstrates that the inner struggle, the dynamics of which are described most fully in Sartor, is analogous to the Jungian process of individuation. For the first time in critical literature, the basic ideas of Carlyle’s philosophy are thus linked to depth psychology and shown to be analogous to the fundamental concepts of Analytical Psychology. In recent criticism, it has been asserted that the crisis recorded in Sartor is akin to the crisis of doubt said to underlie Jean Paul’s “Rede des todten Christus” (1796), which is probably the first poetic expression of nihilism in European literature and has become a classic. Apart from demonstrating that, in the last fifty years at least, the “Rede” has erroneously been interpreted as a dream of annihilation, this book invalidates the view of Jean Paul as victim of the skepticism of his age, and argues that, contrary to what is usually maintained, the “Rede” is not the document of a crisis, but of a belief which had become antiquated and obsolete for Carlyle.

Poets Laureate in the Holy Roman Empire

A Bio-bibliographical Handbook

Author: John Flood

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 2803

View: 344

Petrarch’s revival of the ancient practice of laureation in 1341 led to the laurel being conferred on poets throughout Europe in the later Middle Ages and the Early Modern period. Within the Holy Roman Empire, Maximilian I conferred the title of Imperial Poet Laureate especially frequently, and later it was bestowed with unbridled liberality by Counts Palatine and university rectors too. This handbook identifies more than 1300 poets laureated within the Empire and adjacent territories between 1355 and 1804, giving (wherever possible) a sketch of their lives, a list of their published works, and a note of relevant scholarly literature. The introduction and various indexes provide a detailed account of a now largely forgotten but once significant literary-sociological phenomenon and illuminate literary networks in the Early Modern period.

Holy Men and Holy Women

Old English Prose Saints' Lives and Their Contexts

Author: Paul E. Szarmach

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 390

View: 251

This is a collection of essays on the literature of "saints' lives" in Anglo-Saxon literature.

Historical Dictionary of Lutheranism

Author: Günther Gassmann

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 448

View: 129

This historical dictionary examines the development of Lutheranism from its inception in the 16th century to its place as one of the largest and most influential Protestant denominations in the modern world. This book explores Lutheranism's middle position between Roman Catholicism/ Eastern Orthodoxy and the Reformed Presbyterian and other Protestant Churches. It is well-suited to the religious scholar and those with a historical interest in church development.

Studies in German

Author: Catholic University of America

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 163

View: 560

Notebooks

Author: Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Publisher: New York] : Pantheon Books, [1957-c1990 .

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 538

View: 453

During his adult life until his death in 1834, Coleridge made entries in more than sixty notebooks. Neither commonplace books nor diaries, but something of both, they contain notes on literary, theological, philosophical, scientific, social, and psychological matters, plans for and fragments of works, and many other items of great interest. This fourth double volume of the Notebooks covers the years 1819 through 1826. The range of Coleridge's reading, his endless questioning, and his recondite sources continue to fascinate the reader. Included here are drafts and full versions of the later poems. Many passages reflect the theological interests that led to Coleridge's writing of Aids to Reflection, later to become an important source for the Transcendentalists. Another development in this volume is the startling expansion of Coleridge's interest in "the theory of life" and in chemistry--the laboratory chemistry of the Royal Institution of Great Britain and the theoretical chemistry of German transcendentalists such as Oken, Steffens, and Oersted. Also contained in this volume is an important section on the meaning of marriage.

F.H. Bradley

Miscellaneous Writings

Author: F.H. Bradley

Publisher: Thoemmes

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 2552

View: 870

F. H. Bradley (1846-1924) is a key transitional figure in the development of twentieth-century Western philosophy. The most important British philosopher of his time, he was strongly influenced by the classical tradition, the idealism of Hegel, the sceptical turn of Hume, and the German psychologists of the Herbartian school. His own influence, in turn, was far-reaching, extending to such diverse figures as Samuel Alexander, Bernard Bosanquet, R. G. Collingwood, John Dewey, T. S. Eliot, Gabriel Marcel, Bertrand Russell, Alfred North Whitehead and Ludwig Wittgenstein. This new annotated edition gathers a huge selection of Bradley's unpublished remains, together with a large collection of his correspondence with the major thinkers of the time. Most of these writings, including selected notebooks, articles and letters, have never been published before. All the volumes are newly typeset. F. H. Bradley: Miscellaneous Writings is a major publishing event and the culmination of over 20 years' scholarship by Professor Keene. The comprehesive new editorial material includes introductions by the editor, thorough annotation and indexing. This important collection will offer not only new insights into Bradley's place in the history of philosophy but also new perspectives on how his works should be read. —5 new volumes of selected unpublished remains and correspondence of F. H. Bradley —Features 2 volumes collecting Bradley's correspondence, spanning 50 years, with Russell, Samuel Alexander, Bosanquet, G. F. Stout, Gabriel Marcel, William James, Andrew Seth Pringle- Pattison and many others —Includes Bradley's notes on T. H. Green's lectures on moral and political philosophy, selected undergraduate essays, notebooks preparatory of his major works, lists of what Bradley read, essays that never reached publication, an inventory of Bradley's papers, and a catalogue of Bradley's personal library —Important resource not just for the study of Bradley but also his intellectual circle - gives a snapshot of an important chapter in the history of Western philosophy —Extremely comprehensive new editorial matter including thorough annotation, introductions, biographical notes on the correspondents and indexes to the correspondence by subject and name