Rural Modernity, Everyday Life and Visual Culture

Author: Rosemary Shirley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 708

Through the lens of the everyday, this book explores ’the countryside’ as an inhabited and practised realm with lived rhythms and routines. It relocates the topography of everyday life from its habitually urban focus, out into the English countryside. The rural is often portrayed as existing outside of modernity, or as its passive victim. Here, the rural is recast as an active and complex site of modernity, a shift which contributes alternative ways of thinking the rural and a new perspective on the everyday. In each chapter, pieces of visual culture - including scrapbooks, art works, adverts, photographs and films - are presented as tools of analysis which articulate how aspects of the everyday might operate differently in non-metropolitan places. The book features new readings of the work of significant artists and photographers, such as Jeremy Deller and Alan Kane, Stephen Willats, Anna Fox, Andrew Cross, Tony Ray Jones and Homer Sykes, seen through this rural lens, together with analysis of visually fascinating archival materials including early Shell Guides and rarely seen scrapbooks made by the Women’s Institute. Combining everyday life, rural modernity and visual cultures, this book is able to uncover new and different stories about the English countryside and contribute significantly to current thinking on everyday life, rural geographies and visual cultures.

Rural Modernity, Everyday Life and Visual Culture

Author: Dr Rosemary Shirley

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 711

Through the lens of the everyday, this book explores ‘the countryside’ as an inhabited and practised realm with lived rhythms and routines. It relocates the topography of everyday life from its habitually urban focus, out into the English countryside. The rural is often portrayed as existing outside of modernity, or as its passive victim. Here, the rural is recast as an active and complex site of modernity, a shift which contributes alternative ways of thinking the rural and a new perspective on the everyday. In each chapter, pieces of visual culture - including scrapbooks, art works, adverts, photographs and films - are presented as tools of analysis which articulate how aspects of the everyday might operate differently in non-metropolitan places. The book features new readings of the work of significant artists and photographers, such as Jeremy Deller and Alan Kane, Stephen Willats, Anna Fox, Andrew Cross, Tony Ray Jones and Homer Sykes, seen through this rural lens, together with analysis of visually fascinating archival materials including early Shell Guides and rarely seen scrapbooks made by the Women’s Institute. Combining everyday life, rural modernity and visual cultures, this book is able to uncover new and different stories about the English countryside and contribute significantly to current thinking on everyday life, rural geographies and visual cultures.

The Non-metropolitan Everyday and Visual Culture

Author: Rosemary Shirley

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 567

In much of the existing literature on everyday life the spaces, rhythms and routines of the modern city are overwhelmingly privileged as sites of the everyday. This research relocates the topography of the everyday from its habitually urban focus, out into the English countryside by presenting an account of certain aspects of everyday life from a non-metropolitan perspective. The rural is often portrayed as existing outside of modernity, or as its passive victim. This thesis recasts the rural as an active and complex site of modernity and as such contributes to alternative ways of thinking the rural and a new perspective on the everyday. A central concern is to complicate established distinctions between the city and the country through developing the notion of the non-metropolitan. Also important, is discussion of how the ongoing tension between ancient and modern, and preservation and development, is articulated in non-metropolitan everyday practices. This study theoretically repopulates the rural, thinking it not only as a space to be looked at, moved through or visited, but as a space which is lived in. The first chapters examine everyday practices more often associated with the urban such as driving and littering, and rethinks them through a rural perspective. The later chapters focus on practices that are more traditionally embedded in the non-metropolitan: membership of the Women's Institute and calendar customs such as village fetes, examining how these activities might be re-situated in discourses of modernity. The work is primarily informed by visual cultures including scrapbooks, photographs and films, that articulate how these aspects of the everyday might operate differently in non-metropolitan places. In addition, textual and original archival work contributes significantly to this study.

Painting Out of the Ordinary

Modernity and the Art of Everyday Life in Nineteenth-century Britain

Author: David H. Solkin

Publisher: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 270

View: 987

With its plethora of illustrations, many of works published here for the first time, 'Painting Out of the Ordinary' will be compulsory reading for anyone interested in British art and society of the Romantic era.

Ezra Pound and the Visual Culture of Modernism

Author: Rebecca Beasley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 221

View: 364

An important contribution to the study of Pound's influences and of the relationship between modernism and art.

The Distorting Mirror

Visual Modernity in China

Author: Laikwan Pang

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 294

View: 532

The Distorting Mirror analyzes the multiple and complex ways in which urban Chinese subjects saw themselves interacting with the new visual culture that emerged during the turbulent period between the 1880s and the 1930s. The media and visual forms examined include lithography, photography, advertising, film, and theatrical performances. Urbanites actively engaged with and enjoyed this visual culture, which was largely driven by the subjective desire for the empty promises of modernity—promises comprised of such abstract and fleeting concepts as new, exciting, and fashionable. Detailing and analyzing the trajectories of development of various visual representations, Laikwan Pang emphasizes their interactions. In doing so, she demonstrates that visual modernity was not only a combination of independent cultural phenomena, but also a partially coherent sociocultural discourse whose influences were seen in different and collective parts of the culture. The work begins with an overall historical account and theorization of a new lithographic pictorial culture developing at the end of the nineteenth century and an examination of modernity’s obsession with the investigation of the real. Subsequent chapters treat the fascination with the image of the female body in the new visual culture; entertainment venues in which this culture unfolded and was performed; how urbanites came to terms with and interacted with the new reality; and the production and reception of images, the dynamics between these two being a theme explored throughout the book. Modernity, as the author shows, can be seen as spectacle. At the same time, she demonstrates that, although the excessiveness of this spectacle captivated the modern subject, it did not completely overwhelm or immobilize those who engaged with it. After all, she argues, they participated in and performed with this ephemeral visual culture in an attempt to come to terms with their own new, modern self.

Visual Culture in Spain and Mexico

Author: Anny Brooksbank Jones

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 232

View: 440

Visual Culture in Spain and Mexico analyzes films, paintings and museum exhibitions to show how aspects of hispanic visual culture 'manage' or 'mediate' risk, as articulated stylistically and ideologically in the visual artefact. The book is divided into six chapters plus an Introduction. The first three chapters deal with Mexico or more accurately aspects of life in Mexico City; the other three with Spain or more precisely with the Basque Country and aspects of cultural appropriation which include but also exceed Basque cultural politics.

Visual Culture

The Study of the Visual After the Cultural Turn

Author: Margarita Dikovitskaya

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 316

View: 697

Drawing on interviews, responses to questionnaires, and oral histories by U.S.