Rome in the Ancient World

From Romulus to Justinian

Author: D. S. Potter

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 206

How did the Romans go from a small tribe living on the banks of the Tiber to an imperial power that at its height encompassed some 64 million people across three continents? And how can we explain the decline and eventual collapse of this vast empire? This authoritative, highly readable textbook offers a complete survey of the history of Rome from its origins, through the Republic and Empire, to the period of its decline and fall, ending with the emergence of Mohammed in the 6th century.Written by a historian with an international reputation, the book incorporates the most recent scholarship and archaeological evidence. It describes the key events in Roman history, and offers fascinating insights into Roman life and culture as they changed and developed over the centuries.

Popular Culture in the Ancient World

Author: Lucy Grig

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 348

View: 116

This book adopts a new approach to the classical world by focusing on ancient popular culture.

Rivers and the Power of Ancient Rome

Author: Brian Campbell

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 878

Figuring in myth, religion, law, the military, commerce, and transportation, rivers were at the heart of Rome's increasing exploitation of the environment of the Mediterranean world. In Rivers and the Power of Ancient Rome, Brian Campbell explores the role and influence of rivers and their surrounding landscape on the society and culture of the Roman Empire. Examining artistic representations of rivers, related architecture, and the work of ancient geographers and topographers, as well as writers who describe rivers, Campbell reveals how Romans defined the geographical areas they conquered and how geography and natural surroundings related to their society and activities. In addition, he illuminates the prominence and value of rivers in the control and expansion of the Roman Empire--through the legal regulation of riverine activities, the exploitation of rivers in military tactics, and the use of rivers as routes of communication and movement. Campbell shows how a technological understanding of--and even mastery over--the forces of the river helped Rome rise to its central place in the ancient world.

Rome in the Ancient World

Author: David Potter

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Rome

Page: 368

View: 356

This authoritative, highly readable textbook offers a complete survey of the history of Rome from its origins, through the Republic and Empire, to the period of its decline and fall, ending with the emergence of Mohammed in the 6th century. Written by a historian with an international reputation, the book incorporates the most recent scholarship and archaeological evidence. It describes the key events in Roman history, and offers fascinating insights into Roman life and culture as they changed and developed over the centuries.

Romans in a New World

Classical Models in Sixteenth-century Spanish America

Author: David A. Lupher

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 312

Romans in a New World shows how the ancient Romans haunted the Spanish conquest of the New World, more often than not as passionately rejected models. While the conquistadors themselves and their publicists challenged the reputations of the Romans for incomparable military genius and daring, Spanish critics of the conquest launched a concerted assault upon two other prominent uses of ancient Rome as a model: as an exemplar of imperialistic motives and behavior fit for Christians to follow, and as a yardstick against which to measure the cultural level of the natives of the New World. In the course of this debate, many Spaniards were inspired to think more deeply on their own ethnic ancestry and identity, as Spanish treatment of the New World natives awakened the slumbering memory of Roman treatment of the Iberian tribes whom modern Spaniards were now embracing as their truest ancestors. At the same time, growing awareness of the cultural practices--especially the religious rituals--of the American natives framed a new perspective on both the pre-Christian ancestors of modern Europeans and even on the survival of "pagan" customs among modern Europeans themselves. In this incisive study, David A. Lupher addresses the increasingly debated question of the impact the discovery of the New World had upon Europeans' perceptions of their identity and place in history. Romans in a New World holds much to interest both classicists and students of the history and culture of early modern Europe--especially, though not exclusively, historians of Spain. David A. Lupher's concern with the ideology of imperialism and colonization and with cross-cultural negotiations will be useful to students of cultural studies, as well. David A. Lupher is Professor of Classics, University of Puget Sound.

The new deal in old Rome

how government in the ancient world tried to deal with modern problems

Author: Henry Joseph Haskell

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 258

View: 158

Engineering in the Ancient World, Revised Edition

With a Revised Preface, a New Appendix, and a New Bibliography

Author: J. G. Landels

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 238

View: 478

In a new edition of this highly acclaimed book, the author reveals the engineering know-how of the ancient Greeks and Romans. In fascinating detail he describes how they developed and constructed their machines, and considers how the same principles are used in modern-day engineering.

Sexing the World

Grammatical Gender and Biological Sex in Ancient Rome

Author: Anthony Corbeill

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 426

From the moment a child in ancient Rome began to speak Latin, the surrounding world became populated with objects possessing grammatical gender—masculine eyes (oculi), feminine trees (arbores), neuter bodies (corpora). Sexing the World surveys the many ways in which grammatical gender enabled Latin speakers to organize aspects of their society into sexual categories, and how this identification of grammatical gender with biological sex affected Roman perceptions of Latin poetry, divine power, and the human hermaphrodite. Beginning with the ancient grammarians, Anthony Corbeill examines how these scholars used the gender of nouns to identify the sex of the object being signified, regardless of whether that object was animate or inanimate. This informed the Roman poets who, for a time, changed at whim the grammatical gender for words as seemingly lifeless as "dust" (pulvis) or "tree bark" (cortex). Corbeill then applies the idea of fluid grammatical gender to the basic tenets of Roman religion and state politics. He looks at how the ancients tended to construct Rome's earliest divinities as related male and female pairs, a tendency that waned in later periods. An analogous change characterized the dual-sexed hermaphrodite, whose sacred and political significance declined as the republican government became an autocracy. Throughout, Corbeill shows that the fluid boundaries of sex and gender became increasingly fixed into opposing and exclusive categories. Sexing the World contributes to our understanding of the power of language to shape human perception.

The Roman Empire in Context

Historical and Comparative Perspectives

Author: Johann P. Arnason

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 860

Through a series of original essays by leading international scholars, The Roman Empire in Context: Historical and Comparative Perspectives offers a comparative historical analysis of the Roman empire’s role and achievement and, more broadly, establishes Rome’s significance within comparative studies. Fills a gap in comparative historical analysis of the Roman empire’s role and achievement Features contributions from more than a dozen distinguished scholars from around the world Explores the relevance of important comparativist themes of state, empire, and civilization to ancient Rome