Roget's Thesaurus of Words for Intellectuals

Synonyms, Antonyms, and Related Terms Every Smart Person Should Know How to Use

Author: David Olsen

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 448

View: 928

"Contains material adapted from The big book of words you should know"--T.p. verso.

Roget's Thesaurus of Words for Writers

Over 2,300 Emotive, Evocative, Descriptive Synonyms, Antonyms, and Related Terms Every Writer Should Know

Author: David Olsen

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 448

View: 448

The ultimate tool for writers! Whether you're crafting the next great American novel or pounding away at a last-minute blog entry, there will come a time in the process when you struggle to find just the perfect word or phrase. Under the time-tested banner of Roget's Thesaurus, this collection will quickly become the most essential tool on your desk when you're working on your next piece. Far from an ordinary word list, each entry in this book is organized by meaning and offers a list of compelling word choices that relate to the ideas you'd like to use. It also provides a pronunciation guide, definition, antonyms, synonyms, and a sample sentence for each listing. Filled with thousands of unique and compelling words, this book will help you find inspiration, expand your vocabulary, and create one-of-a-kind sentences for any writing assignment. With Roget's Thesaurus of Words for Writers, you'll set your projects in the right direction and engage your audience--one word at a time.

The Unexpected Evolution of Language

Discover the Surprising Etymology of Everyday Words

Author: Justin Cord Hayes

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 240

View: 230

This book is awesome awful! Did you know that "awful" first originated as a compliment? How about the fact that it was perfectly fine for someone to defecate in their living room? Or that at one time a bully was actually a sweetheart? You may think that these things sound outlandish, but hundreds of years ago, the words "awful," "defecate," and "bully" meant something entirely different than what we know today. The Unexpected Evolution of Language reveals the origins of 208 everyday terms and the interesting stories behind their shift in meaning. Arranged in alphabetical order, you will enjoy uncovering the backstories to terms like: Awful - worthy of respect or fear; inspiring awe Bimbo - slang for a stupid, inconsequential man Defecate - to purify; cleanse Invest - to clothe; to dress Nice - foolish; stupid Relay - hunting term meaning fresh pack of hounds From "aftermath" and "sophisticated" to "empty" and "prestige," you will aboslutely love seeing just what kind of damage time has done to the English language.

801 Things You Should Know

From Greek Philosophy to Today's Technology, Theories, Events, Discoveries, Trends, and Movements That Matter

Author: David Olsen

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 256

View: 192

Discover how the world's biggest ideas, inventions, and actions changed the course of history! What would life be like if the Age of Reason never challenged others to think differently, if the Industrial Revolution never happened, or if the New York Stock Exchange never came into existence? 801 Things You Should Know gives you the lowdown on thoughts and events that transformed past civilizations into the cultures that we know today. Each entry explains a game-changing concept or moment in time, detailing how it helped shape societies around the globe. You'll uncover fascinating details you'd never heard before, and be surprised to learn how these major influences have directly impacted the way you live. From the sixth century B.C. to the present day, you'll discover the captivating people, acts, and ideas that have inspired change--and revolutionized the world.

The Terrible Meanings of Names

Or Why You Shouldn't Poke Your Giselle with a Barry

Author: Justin Cord Hayes

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 240

View: 114

The bizarre meanings behind everyday names! Did you know that Jacobs tend to cheat in school, Marys have nasty attitudes, and Catherines like to cause pain? If our names are meant to represent our character, then these kids have quite a number of unsavory traits, according to their moniker's definition. The same is true for many of today's common names. From Andrea (strong and manly) and Douglas (black water) to Hayden (heathen) and Trent (invader, trespasser), these people have been granted a life of misery, ugliness, mischief, and confusion simply by being referred to by their name. The Terrible Meanings of Names reveals the strange (and sometimes insulting) meanings behind the names you hear every day. Filled with hundreds of unfortunate definitions and backstories, you'll uncover the surprising origins and definitions of all your friends' names.

Networks and Knowledge in Roget's Thesaurus

Author: Werner Hüllen

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 240

View: 198

In this book Werner Hüllen examines Roget's Thesaurus in relation to linguistics, philosophy and history. He explores the influence of Roget's Thesaurus abroad (Germany and the Romance countries). He epitomizes its history and compares the various editions of the book. In lexical case studies he evaluates some entries with pertinence to their cultural and political implications. He discusses the didactic potential of thesauri in general and considers the implications of the Thesaurus for the study of scholarly linguistics and psychology. He discusses how Roget's Thesaurus prepared the way for the more recent idea of network semantics. By analyzing retrieval techniques one can show, he claims, how the words of languages were (and are) stored in the minds of those who speak them. Professor Hüllen concludes by considering the role of synonymy in language from a perspective of cognitive linguistics showing that it is indispensable for communication.

Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases

Author: Peter Mark Roget

Publisher: Library of Alexandria

ISBN:

Category: Devotional exercises

Page: 191

View: 338

1. BEING, IN THE ABSTRACT 1. Existence -- N. existence, being, entity, ens[Lat.], esse [Lat.], subsistence. reality, actuality; positiveness &c adj.; fact, matter of fact, sober reality; truth &c 494; actual existence. presence &c (existence in space) 186; coexistence &c 120. stubborn fact, hard fact; not a dream &c 515; no joke. center of life, essence, inmost nature, inner reality, vital principle. [Science of existence], ontology. V. exist, be; have being &c n.; subsist, live, breathe, stand, obtain, be the case; occur &c (event) 151; have place, prevail; find oneself, pass the time, vegetate. consist in, lie in; be comprised in, be contained in, be constituted by. come into existence &c n.; arise &c (begin) 66; come forth &c (appear) 446. become &c (be converted) 144; bring into existence &c 161. abide, continue, endure, last, remain, stay. Adj. existing &c v.; existent, under the sun; in existence &c n.; extant; afloat, afoot, on foot, current, prevalent; undestroyed. real, actual, positive, absolute; true &c 494; substantial, substantive; self-existing, self-existent; essential. well-founded, well-grounded; unideal†, unimagined; not potential &c 2; authentic. Adv. actually &c adj.; in fact, in point of fact, in reality; indeed; de facto, ipso facto. Phr. ens rationis [Lat.]; ergo sum cogito [Lat.], thinkest thou existence doth depend on time? [Byron].

Historical Dictionaries and Historical Dictionary Research

Papers from the International Conference on Historical Lexicography and Lexicology, at the University of Leicester, 2002

Author: Julie Coleman

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 231

View: 505

This volume is a collection of papers from the 1st International Conference on Historical Lexicography and Lexicology at the University of Leicester in 2002. The purpose of the conference was to bring together scholars and academics from around the world working as scholars and editors on historical dictionaries or as practising lexicographers. The papers are, accordingly, arranged in two sections, reflecting the distinction between those individuals working on the historical development of dictionaries and those considering the lexicological problems and challenges facing the lexicographer in attempting to represent as fully and justly as possible historical forms of the English language.