Religion in England, 1688-1791

Author: Ernest Gordon Rupp

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 584

View: 996

Professor Rupp looks at the consequences of the Revolution of 1688, including the Toleration Act and the schism created by those who felt bound in conscience not to accept the new monarchy. He asks how the alliance between Church and State affected the Establishment, and how party politicsmodified its attitudes and sought to silence its independent voice. He describes the life and worship of the Churches; the survival of intolerance despite the principle of toleration; the growth of the dissenting Churches, and the predicament of the Roman Catholics.

The Routledge Companion to Britain in the Eighteenth Century

Author: Jeremy Gregory

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 757

Enormously rich and wide-ranging, The Routledge Companion to Britain in the Eighteenth Century brings together, in one handy reference, a wide range of essential information on the major aspects of eighteenth century British history. The information included is chronological, statistical, tabular and bibliographical, and the book begins with the eighteenth century political system before going on to cover foreign affairs and the empire, the major military and naval campaigns, law and order, religion, economic and financial advances, and social and cultural history. Key features of this user-friendly volume include: wide-ranging political chronologies major wars and rebellions key treaties and their terms chronologies of religious events approximately 500 biographies of leading figures essential data on population, output and trade a detailed glossary of terms a comprehensive cultural and intellectual chronology set out in tabular form a uniquely detailed and comprehensive topic bibliography. All those studying or teaching eighteenth century British history will find this concise volume an indispensable resource for use and reference.

When History Teaches Us Nothing, Second Edition

The Recent Reformed Sonship Debate in Context

Author: Tim J. R. Trumper

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 136

View: 233

Tim J. R. Trumper draws on his decades of historical, biblical, and theological research into the doctrine of adoption to offer a unique reflection on the Sonship debate—one with lasting implications for the Reformed tradition. Much the buzz in confessional Presbyterian circles around the turn of the millennium, the debate concerned the discipleship course developed by practical theologian John C. (“Jack”) Miller (1928–1996) and his wife Rose Marie. Whereas some attested to God’s use of Sonship in their spiritual rejuvenation, others questioned its Reformed credentials. Setting the debate, in pioneering fashion, against the backdrop of the historical theology of adoption, Trumper offers an assessment that is enlightening, evenhanded, and constructive. His fresh portrayal of the history of the Reformed tradition teaches the value of pausing before rushing to judgment, and is a reminder that the meeting of spiritual needs requires more biblical exposition not less of it. While addressing the points of debate, When History Teaches Us Nothing is, above all, a call to the church to recover the doctrine of adoption, and to the Reformed community to revive her creative orthodoxy, to recapture Scripture’s balance of the juridical and familial aspects of the faith, and to do so with grace.

Religion and Women in Britain, c. 1660-1760

Author: Sarah Apetrei

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 146

The essays contained in this volume examine the particular religious experiences of women within a remarkably vibrant and formative era in British religious history. Scholars from the disciplines of history, literary studies and theology assess women's contributions to renewal, change and reform; and consider the ways in which women negotiated institutional and intellectual boundaries. The focus on women's various religious roles and responses helps us to understand better a world of religious commitment which was not separate from, but also not exclusively shaped by, the political, intellectual and ecclesiastical disputes of a clerical elite. As well as deepening our understanding of both popular and elite religious cultures in this period, and the links between them, the volume re-focuses scholarly approaches to the history of gender and especially the history of feminism by setting the British writers often characterised as 'early feminists' firmly in their theological and spiritual traditions.

Britain in the Hanoverian Age, 1714-1837

An Encyclopedia

Author: Gerald Newman

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1286

View: 459

In 1714, king George I ushered in a remarkable 123-year period of energy that changed the face of Britain and ultimately had a profound effect on the modern era. The pioneers of modern capitalism, industry, democracy, literature, and even architecture flourished during this time and their innovations and influence spread throughout the British empire, including the United States. Now this rich cultural period in Britain is effectively surveyed and summarized for quick reference in a first-of-its-kind encyclopedia, which contains entries by British, Canadian, American, and Australian scholars specializing in everything from finance and the fine arts to politics and patent law. More than 380 illustrations, mostly rare engravings, enhance the coverage, which runs the whole gamut of political, economic, literary, intellectual, artistic, commercial, and social life, and spotlights some 600 prominent individuals and families.

Religion and the State

Europe and North America in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Author: Josh Stein

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 177

View: 583

The book discusses the relationship of religion to political entities (countries) in Europe and America in the 17th and 18th centuries. It aims to fill a gap in the literature by understanding the varieties of religious expression in Europe at the time and how those trends influenced the rise of religion in the American colonies and the early United States, and also to wonder if the founding fathers of the US desired a Christian nation.

Print and Protestantism in Early Modern England

Author: Ian Green

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 716

View: 440

In this highly innovative study, Ian Green examines the complete array of Protestant titles published in England from the 1530s to the 1720s. These range from the large specialist volumes at the top to cheap tracts at the bottom, from radical on one wing to conservative on the other, and from instructive and devotional manuals to edifying-cum-entertaining works such as religious verse and cautionary tales. Wherever possible the author adopts a statistical approach to permit a focus on those works which sold most copies over a number of years, and in an annotated Appendix provides a brief description of over seven hundred best selling or steady selling religious titles of the period. A close study of these texts and the forms in which they were offered to the public suggests a rapid diversification of both the types of work published and of the readerships at which they were targeted. It also demonstrates shrewd publishers' frequent attempts to plug gaps in a rapidly expanding market. Where previous studies of print have tended to focus on the polemical and the sensational, this one highlights the didactic, devotional, and consensual elements found in most steady selling works. It is also suggested that in these works there were at least three Protestantisms on offer an orthodox, clerical version, a moralistic, rational version favoured by the educated laity, and a popular version that was barely Protestant at all and that the impact of these probably varied both within and between different readerships. These conclusions shed much light not only on the means by which English Protestantism was disseminated, but also on the doctrinally and culturally diffused nature of English Protestantism by the end of the Stuart period. Both the text and the appendix should prove invaluable to anyone interested in the history of the Reformation or in printing as a medium of education and communication in early modern England.

Longman Handbook to Modern British History 1714 - 2001

Author: Chris Cook

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 626

This compact and accessible reference work provides all the essential facts and figures about major aspects of modern British history from the death of Queen Anne to the end of the 1990s. The Longman Handbook of Modern British History has been extended to include a fully-revised bibliography (reflecting the wealth of newly published material in recent years), the new statistics on social and economic history and an expanded glossary of terms. The political chronologies have been revised to include the electoral defeat of John Major and the record of New Labour in office. Designed for the student and general reader, this highly-successful handbook provides a wealth of varied data within the confines of a single volume.

When History Teaches Us Nothing

The Recent Reformed Sonship Debate in Context

Author: Tim J. R. Trumper

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 120

View: 101

When History Teaches Us Nothing is an early historical reflection on the recent Reformed debate over the late John C. (Jack) Miller's Sonship Discipleship Course. Miller (1928-1996), an erstwhile professor of practical theology at Westminster Theological Seminary (Pennsylvania) and an influential pastor in the New Life congregations of the Presbyterian Church in America, sought to minister to the jaded by accenting God's grace in the gospel. Gradually fears grew that his approach was spawning, among other things, an antinomianism and a revivalism antithetical to Reformed theology and piety. While not dismissing these concerns, Trumper argues that Sonship can only be accurately evaluated once it is understood in light of the practical loss within conservative Presbyterianism (i.e., within Westminster Calvinism) of the gracious Fatherhood of God and the sonship of believers. Drawing on his knowledge of the theological history of adoption, Trumper notes the significant parallels between Miller's protest of paternal grace and that of the early nineteenth-century Scottish churchman John Macleod Campbell (notably his stress on the life of sonship--Òthe prospective aspect of the atonementÓ). Trumper thus cautions today's Westminster Calvinists against repeating their forebears' mistake, which was to dismiss the validity of Campbell's protest on the basis of the problems with his proposed solution. By so arguing, the author provides a more balanced and constructive response to the debate, highlighting its potential for the biblical renewal of Westminster Calvinism. Essential to this renewal is the recovery of the Fatherhood of God and of adoption, the evening out of attention accorded the Bible's forensic and relational (specifically familial) elements, and the better reflection of the theology and tenor of the New Testament (especially). Only such a renewal, Trumper argues, can render superfluous further protests for paternal grace.