Rails Through the West

Limerick to Sligo, an Illustrated Journey on the Western Rail Corridor

Author: Jonathan Beaumont

Publisher: Colourpoint Books

ISBN:

Category: Railroads

Page: 143

View: 692

Covering the 1960s to date, this is a portrait of the Limerick to Sligo line which will revive memories of this railway. A century after the GSWR took over, the Western Rail Corridor is display of its own history. At the south end, a busy passenger service, in the middle, renewal work is under way, and at the northern end all is quiet.

Whistle Posts West

Railway Tales from British Columbia, Alberta, and Yukon

Author: Mary Trainer

Publisher: Heritage House Publishing Co

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 192

View: 804

Everybody has a train story. Whether it comes from a distant relative who worked on the railways or from a family train trip that formed a lasting impression of the Canadian landscape, trains inspire a sense of wonder and nostalgia. They are embedded in the history of Canada as a whole and western Canada in particular, and for generations they were how most people travelled and saw the country. Today, trains get the most attention in the context of tragedy, in the aftermath of rare but catastrophic derailments. However, train stories go beyond these modern-day disaster tales or romantic glimpses into the past. Whistle Posts West presents a compelling array of stories that illustrate how and why the railways continue to capture our imaginations. From the heartbreaking to the humorous, from the awe-inspiring to the absurd, this fascinating collection of railway tales from BC and Alberta is sure to please.

Rail-Trails Midwest Great Lakes

Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin

Author: Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

Publisher: Wilderness Press

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 392

View: 323

With 120 rural, suburban, and urban trails threading through nearly 2300 miles, Rail-Trails Midwest: Great Lakes covers Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The Midwest has thousands of miles of rail corridor that have been turned into 360 rail-trails in the Great Lakes alone. With 1540 miles in Wisconsin and 1443 miles in Michigan, this region is also home to the two states with the most rail-trails in the country. This two-color book includes succinct descriptions of each trail from start to finish, plus at-a-glance summary information indicating permitted uses, surface type, length, and directions to trailheads for each trail. Every trip has a detailed map that includes start and end points, trailhead, parking, restroom facilities, and other amenities.

Rail-Trails West

California, Arizona, and Nevada

Author: Rails-to-Trails Conservancy

Publisher: Wilderness Press

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 264

View: 299

In this edition in the popular series, the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy presents the best of the West. With 70 rural, suburban, and urban trails threading through 1,050 miles, Rail-Trails West covers 60 trails in California, eight in Arizona, and two in Nevada. Many rail-trails offer escapes from city life, like the Mount Lowe Railway Trail, high above the buzzing Los Angeles basin on a rail line vacationers once took to a mountaintop resort. Others offer the pure sensory thrill of sweeping terrain, like Arizona's 7-mile Prescott Peavine Trail. Still more juxtapose the natural world with the railroad's industrial past, like Nevada's Historic Railroad Hiking Trail, which passes through five massive tunnels to reach Hoover Dam. Every trip has a detailed map, directions to the trailhead, and information about parking, restroom facilities, and other amenities. Many of the level rail-trails are suitable for walking, jogging, bicycling, inline skating, wheelchairs, and horses.

Canoeing & Kayaking West Virginia

Author: Paul Davidson

Publisher: Menasha Ridge Press

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 352

View: 411

Canoeing & Kayaking West Virginia is the definitive guide to whitewater in the Mountain State. More than 40 years after the initial printing, this book continues to bring paddlers the best of West Virginia's waters: from classics rivers, such as the Gauley, the New, and the Tygart, to steep creeks like North Fork of Blackwater and Meadow River. At-a-glance information for each river section helps boaters pick rivers to match their ability and current weather conditions, while river descriptions, gauge and shuttle route information provide additional critical information. Whether boating in kayaks, canoes, or sit-on-tops, paddlers will find more than enough rivers to fit their interest or skill level. In addition, literary interludes scattered throughout each book will invoke the spirit of paddling, encouraging readers' contemplation of past and future trips. Appendices include websites, gauge information, and safety information, making this book a valuable resource in planning out the next trip.

Rails through Barnsley

A Photographic History

Author: Alan Whitehouse

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 136

View: 104

Few people realize it, but Barnsley was once the center of a railway universe. In Victorian times, dozens of competing companies put forward schemes to build railways across, through and around the town. Between them they constructed what some still regard as the most dense railway network in the country – more complicated even than London’s commuter system or even the railway networks of our major cities. The reason almost no one knows about it is because many of the lines built never saw a passenger service. They were built for one reason: coal. A maze of semi-unknown branches served every colliery in the district and the network became so overloaded with coal trains that they even had to build a railway bypass around the town to prevent everything grinding to a standstill! Down the years Barnsley’s railway network became something of a backwater, ignored by many enthusiasts and photographers. So the full story of how the railways aided the town’s prosperity has rarely been told. This book is an attempt to put that right by giving a relatively short – but fact-packed – history, looking at each of the railway companies that opened up the town and connecting it with what was going on in the outside world. It includes a collection of high quality images, many of which have not been seen before. As the coal industry rose and fell, so did the railway system which served it, and this book will show exactly how it all happened and why.

Rails Over the Mountains

Exploring the Railway Heritage of Canada's Western Mountains

Author: Ron Brown

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 160

View: 284

Explore western Canada’s rich railway history, travelling from the grand railway hotels and rustic stations to the creative engineering that created spiral bridges and soaring trestles. Relive this time through a trip on one of the many steam trains, visit a railway museum, or walk the trails where trains used to rumble.

The Western Journal, and Civilian

Devoted to Agriculture, Manufactures, Mechanic Arts, Internal Improvement, Commerce, Public Policy, and Polite Literature

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: American periodicals

Page:

View: 315

The Western Journal and Civilian

Devoted to Agriculture, Manufactures, Mechanic Arts, Internal Improvement, Commerce, Public Policy, and Polite Literature

Author: Micajah Tarver

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: United States

Page:

View: 771

The Civil War in the West

Victory and Defeat from the Appalachians to the Mississippi

Author: Earl J. Hess

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 269

The Western theater of the Civil War, rich in agricultural resources and manpower and home to a large number of slaves, stretched 600 miles north to south and 450 miles east to west from the Appalachians to the Mississippi. If the South lost the West, there would be little hope of preserving the Confederacy. Earl J. Hess's comprehensive study of how Federal forces conquered and held the West examines the geographical difficulties of conducting campaigns in a vast land, as well as the toll irregular warfare took on soldiers and civilians alike. Hess balances a thorough knowledge of the battle lines with a deep understanding of what was happening within the occupied territories. In addition to a mastery of logistics, Union victory hinged on making use of black manpower and developing policies for controlling constant unrest while winning campaigns. Effective use of technology, superior resource management, and an aggressive confidence went hand in hand with Federal success on the battlefield. In the end, Confederates did not have the manpower, supplies, transportation potential, or leadership to counter Union initiatives in this critical arena.