“I Love Learning; I Hate School”

An Anthropology of College

Author: Susan D. Blum

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 336

View: 683

Frustrated by her students' performance, her relationships with them, and her own daughter’s problems in school, Susan D. Blum, a professor of anthropology, set out to understand why her students found their educational experience at a top-tier institution so profoundly difficult and unsatisfying. Through her research and in conversations with her students, she discovered a troubling mismatch between the goals of the university and the needs of students. In "I Love Learning; I Hate School," Blum tells two intertwined but inseparable stories: the results of her research into how students learn contrasted with the way conventional education works, and the personal narrative of how she herself was transformed by this understanding. Blum concludes that the dominant forms of higher education do not match the myriad forms of learning that help students—people in general—master meaningful and worthwhile skills and knowledge. Students are capable of learning huge amounts, but the ways higher education is structured often leads them to fail to learn. More than that, it leads to ill effects. In this critique of higher education, infused with anthropological insights, Blum explains why so much is going wrong and offers suggestions for how to bring classroom learning more in line with appropriate forms of engagement. She challenges our system of education and argues for a “reintegration of learning with life.”

Imitating Christ in Magwi

An Anthropological Theology

Author: Todd D. Whitmore

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 400

View: 707

Imitating Christ in Magwi: An Anthropological Theology achieves two things. First, focusing on indigenous Roman Catholics in northern Uganda and South Sudan, it is a detailed ethnography of how a community sustains hope in the midst of one of the most brutal wars in recent memory, that between the Ugandan government and the rebel Lord's Resistance Army. Whitmore finds that the belief that the spirit of Jesus Christ can enter into a person through such devotions as the Adoration of the Eucharist gave people the wherewithal to carry out striking works of mercy during the conflict, and, like Jesus of Nazareth, to risk their lives in the process. Traditional devotion leveraged radical witness. Second, Gospel Mimesis is a call for theology itself to be a practice of imitating Christ. Such practice requires both living among people on the far margins of society – Whitmore carried out his fieldwork in Internally Displaced Persons camps – and articulating a theology that foregrounds the daily, if extraordinary, lives of people. Here, ethnography is not an add-on to theological concepts; rather, ethnography is a way of doing theology, and includes what anthropologists call “thick description” of lives of faith. Unlike theology that draws only upon abstract concepts, what Whitmore calls “anthropological theology” is consonant with the fact that God did indeed become human. It may well involve risk to one's own life – Whitmore had to leave Uganda for three years after writing an article critical of the President – but that is what imitatio Christi sometimes requires.

The Correspondence of W. E. B. Du Bois

Author: William Edward Burghardt Du Bois

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 512

View: 969

Offers an epistolary record of Du Bois's thought and accomplishments as a student, teacher, editor, social critic, and reform leader.

Comic Book Creator #18

Author: Jon B. Cooke

Publisher: TwoMorrows Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 96

View: 847

COMIC BOOK CREATOR #18 features a career-spanning and downright philosophical discussion with STEVE "THE DUDE" RUDE, the Eisner Award-winning artist who got his start back in 1981 as co-creator of intergalactic executioner Nexus. The "eternal art student" (heavily influenced by Jack Kirby, Alex Toth, Russ Manning, and legendary art instructor Andrew Loomis) shares his real-life psychological struggles, the challenges of freelance subsistence, and his creative aspirations. Also: The jungle art of NEAL ADAMS (whose artistry has graced many a TARZAN cover)! Cartoonist MARY FLEENER talks about her forthcoming graphic novel Billie the Bee and her comix career! Part Three of Michael Aushenker's enormous RICH BUCKLER interview! A comprehensive chat with the late Golden Age artist FRANK BORTH about his long friendship with Reed Crandall and his work at Quality and Treasure Chest Comics, and syndicated comic strip work. Plus HEMBECK and other fun features, all in our new full-color 100-page format. NOTE: Contains mild nudity for figure-drawing demonstration; suggested for Mature Readers Only.

Contemporary Literary Criticism

1995 Yearbook

Author: Gale Group

Publisher: Gale / Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 500

View: 951

Each print volume in this long-standing series profiles approximately 6-8 novelists, poets, playwrights and other creative writers by providing full-text or excerpted criticism taken from books, magazines, literary reviews, newspapers and scholarly journals. Among those profiled in this volume are: Stephen Jay Gould Sue Grafton Charles Johnson Modern African Literature