The Quilts of Gee's Bend

Author: Susan Goldman Rubin

Publisher: Abrams

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 56

View: 904

Since the early nineteenth century, the women of Gee’s Bend in southern Alabama have created stunning, vibrant quilts. In the only photo-essay book about the quilts of Gee’s Bend for children, award-winning author Susan Goldman Rubin explores the history and culture of this fascinating group of women and their unique quilting traditions. Rubin uses meticulous research to offer an exclusive look at an important facet of African American art and culture. In the rural community of Gee’s Bend, African American women have been making quilts for generations. They use scraps of old overalls, aprons, and bleached cornmeal sacks—anything they can find. Their traditions have been passed down through the decades. Much to the women’s surprise, a selection of the quilts was featured in an exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, in 2002. The exhibition then traveled to the Whitney Museum in New York City. “Eye-poppingly gorgeous,” wrote a critic for the New York Times about the exhibition. He continued, “Some of the most miraculous works of modern art America has produced.” The Metropolitan Museum of Art will exhibit its newly acquired collection of Gee’s Bend quilts in 2017. Rubin is known for producing well-researched, highly praised, and sophisticated biographies of artists and other important figures. Through similar research, The Quilts of Gee’s Bend shares specifics about this rare community and its rich traditions, allowing children to pause to consider history through the eyes of the people who lived it and through a legacy that is passed on to the next generation. This book should be of great interest to classrooms, libraries, and those interested in African American art in the United States, in addition to quilting, life in early emancipated colonies in the South, and Gee’s Bends importance in the Civil Right’s movement. The quilts and the incredible stories behind them are powerful motivators for anyone who wishes to accomplish anything. A map, directions on how to make a quilt square, endnotes, and an index round out this stunning nonfiction book.

The Quilts of Gee's Bend

Author: John Beardsley

Publisher: Tinwood Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 190

View: 144

Relates the lives of the women of Gee's Bend, Alabama, who for more than 150 years have made quilts reflecting their history and daily lives. Having worked in isolation for generations and continuing to inhabit the remote plantation land their parents once slaved, they have received unexpected attention from the artistic world.

Gee's Bend

The Architecture of the Quilt

Author: William Arnett

Publisher: Tinwood Books

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 223

View: 474

This major book and museum exhibition will travel to seven American museums through 2008. Organized jointly by the Tinwood Alliance and the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, Texas, in conjunction with the Gee's Bend Foundation, the exhibition will present 70 quilt masterpieces from the Alabama town.

Leaving Gee's Bend

Author: Irene Latham

Publisher: NewSouth Books

ISBN:

Category: Young Adult Fiction

Page: 192

View: 818

Ludelphia Bennett may be blind in one eye, but that doesn't mean she can't put in a good stitch. In fact, Ludelphia sews all the time, especially when things are going wrong. But when Mama gets deathly ill, it doesn't seem like even quilting will help. Mama needs medicine badly—medicine that can only be found in Camden, over forty miles away. That's when Ludelphia decides to do something drastic—leave Gee's Bend. Beyond the cotton fields of her small sharecropping community, Ludelphia discovers a world she never imagined, but there's also danger lurking for a young girl on her own. Set in 1932 and inspired by the rich quilting traditions of Gee's Bend, Alabama, Leaving Gee's Bend is a delightful story of a young girl facing a brave new world, presented in a new paperback edition.

Lives, Letters, and Quilts

Women and Everyday Rhetorics of Resistance

Author: Vanessa Kraemer Sohan

Publisher: Albma Rhetoric Cult & Soc Crit

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 232

View: 573

"Explores how writers, composers, and other artists without power resist dominant social, cultural, and political structures through the deployment of unconventional means and materials. To do so, Vanessa Kraemer Sohan focuses on three very unique instances, or case studies, that exemplify such rhetorical strategies--one political, one epistolary, and one artistic"--

Carry it on

The War on Poverty and the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama, 1964-1972

Author: Susan Youngblood Ashmore

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 277

Carry It On is an in-depth study of how the local struggle for equality in Alabama fared in the wake of new federal laws--the Civil Rights Act, the Economic Opportunity Act, and the Voting Rights Act. Susan Youngblood Ashmore provides a sharper definition to changes set in motion by the fall of legal segregation. She focuses her detailed story on the Alabama Black Belt and on the local projects funded by the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO), the federal agency that supported programs in a variety of cities and towns in Alabama. Black Belt activists who used OEO funds understood that the structural underpinnings of poverty were key components of white supremacy, says Ashmore. They were motivated not only to end poverty but also to force local governments to comply with new federal legislation aimed at achieving racial equality on a number of fronts. Ashmore looks closely at the interactions among local activists, elected officials, businesspeople, landowners, bureaucrats, and others who were involved in or affected by OEO projects. Carry It On offers a nuanced picture of the OEO, an agency too broadly criticized; a new look at the rise of southern Black Power; and a compelling portrait of local citizens struggling for control over their own lives. Ashmore provides a more complete understanding of how southerners worked to define for themselves how freedom would come during the years shaped by the civil rights movement and the war on poverty.

Gee's Bend

The Women and Their Quilts

Author: John Beardsley

Publisher: Tinwood Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 432

View: 119

Since the 19th century, the women of Gee's Bend in southern Alabama have created stunning, vibrant quilts. Beautifully illustrated with 350 color illustrations, 30 black-and-white illustrations, and charts, Gee's Bend to Rehoboth is being�released in conjunction with a national exhibition tour including The Museum of Fine Art, Houston, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

The Changing Boundaries and Nature of the Modern Art World

The Art Object and the Object of Art

Author: Richard Kalina

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 287

Concentrating on the shifting boundaries and definition of art, Richard Kalina offers a panoramic view of the contemporary art scene over the last 30 years. His focus is on the ongoing development of concepts, the transformation of art worlds and the social matrices in which they are created. Discussing painting in general and abstract painting in particular, his survey takes in photorealism, sculpture and art forms found outside of the modernist tradition. Kalina's group of artists includes Mel Bochner, Joan Mitchell, Cy Twombly, Franz West, and Alma Thomas who, in their ongoing projects, explicitly or implicitly questioned the aesthetic assumptions of their times. Merging an examination of animating philosophies and context - political, social, and personal - with a sharply focused look at the works of art themselves, Kalina brings us closer to understanding the social matrices in which art is embedded and responds to bigger questions about the object nature of the work of art in today's world.

Oral History and Public Memories

Author: Paula Hamilton

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 986

Oral history is inherently about memory, and when oral history interviews are used "in public," they invariably both reflect and shape public memories of the past. Oral History and Public Memories is the only book that explores this relationship, in fourteen case studies of oral history's use in a variety of venues and media around the world. Readers will learn, for example, of oral history based efforts to reclaim community memory in post-apartheid Cape Town, South Africa; of the role of personal testimony in changing public understanding of Japanese American history in the American West; of oral history's value in mapping heritage sites important to Australia's Aboriginal population; and of the way an oral history project with homeless people in Cleveland, Ohio became a tool for popular education. Taken together, these original essays link the well established practice of oral history to the burgeoning field of memory studies.

Mary Lee Bendolph, Gee's Bend Quilts, and Beyond

Author: Joanne Cubbs

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 71

View: 739

The exhibition focuses on the quilts of Mary Lee Bendolph, and includes quilts by her mother Aolar Mosely, daughter Essie Bendolph Pettway, and daughter-in-law Louisiana P. Bendolph, found-object sculpture and assemblage by Thornton Dial and Lonnie Holley, and intaglio prints by Mary Lee and Louisiana Bendolph.

Writing History from the Margins

African Americans and the Quest for Freedom

Author: Claire Parfait

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 174

View: 385

With contributions from leading American and European scholars, this collection of original essays surveys the actors and the modes of writing history from the "margins" of society, focusing specifically on African Americans. Nearly 100 years after The Journal of Negro History was founded, this book assesses the legacy of the African American historians, mostly amateur historians initially, who wrote the history of their community between the 1830s and World War II. Subsequently, the growth of the civil rights movement further changed historical paradigms--and the place of African Americans and that of black writers in publishing and in the historical profession. Through slavery and segregation, self-educated and formally educated Blacks wrote works of history, often in order to inscribe African Americans within the main historical narrative of the nation, with a two-fold objective: to make African Americans proud of their past and to enable them to fight against white prejudice. Over the past decade, historians have turned to the study of these pioneers, but a number of issues remain to be considered. This anthology will contribute to answering several key questions concerning who published these books, and how were they distributed, read, and received. Little has been written concerning what they reveal about the construction of professional history in the nineteenth century when examined in relation to other writings by Euro-Americans working in an academic setting or as independent researchers.

Media Authorship

Author: Cynthia Chris

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 311

View: 451

Contemporary media authorship is frequently collaborative, participatory, non-site specific, or quite simply goes unrecognized. In this volume, media and film scholars explore the theoretical debates around authorship, intention, and identity within the rapidly transforming and globalized culture industry of new media. Defining media broadly, across a range of creative artifacts and production cultures—from visual arts to videogames, from textiles to television—contributors consider authoring practices of artists, designers, do-it-yourselfers, media professionals, scholars, and others. Specifically, they ask: What constitutes "media" and "authorship" in a technologically converged, globally conglomerated, multiplatform environment for the production and distribution of content? What can we learn from cinematic and literary models of authorship—and critiques of those models—with regard to authorship not only in television and recorded music, but also interactive media such as videogames and the Internet? How do we conceive of authorship through practices in which users generate content collaboratively or via appropriation? What institutional prerogatives and legal debates around intellectual property rights, fair use, and copyright bear on concepts of authorship in "new media"? By addressing these issues, Media Authorship demonstrates that the concept of authorship as formulated in literary and film studies is reinvigorated, contested, remade—even, reauthored—by new practices in the digital media environment.

Quilts Around the World

The Story of Quilting from Alabama to Zimbabwe

Author: Spike Gillespie

Publisher: Voyageur Press

ISBN:

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 352

View: 724

This essential book for all quilters and quilt collectors tells the fascinating story of quilting around the world, illuminated by the international quilt community’s top experts and more than 300 glorious color photographs. Covering Japan, China, Korea, and India; England, Ireland, France, and The Netherlands; Australia, Africa, Central America, North America, and beyond, Quilts Around the World explores both the diversity and common threads of quilting. Discover Aboriginal patchwork from Australia, intricate Rallis from the Middle East, Amish and Hawaiian quilts from the United States, Sashiko quilts from Japan, vivid Molas from Central America, and art quilts from every corner of the globe. Also included are twenty patchwork and applique patterns to use in your own quilt projects, inspired by designs from the world’s most striking quilts.

Placemaking and the Arts

Cultivating the Christian Life

Author: Jennifer Allen Craft

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 972

What role does place play in the Christian life? In this STA volume, Jennifer Allen Craft gives a practical theology of the arts, contending that the arts place us in time, space, and community in ways that encourage us to be fully and imaginatively present in a variety of contexts: the natural world, our homes, our worshiping communities, and society.

Bisa Butler

Portraits

Author: Erica Warren

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 96

View: 277

A beautifully illustrated look at the work of one of today’s most unique and exciting artists Bisa Butler (b. 1973) is an American artist who creates arresting and psychologically nuanced portraits composed entirely of vibrantly colored and patterned fabrics that she cuts, layers, and stitches together. Often depicting scenes from African American life and history, Butler invites viewers to invest in the lives of the people she represents while simultaneously expanding art-historical narratives about American quiltmaking. Situating her interdisciplinary work within the broader history of textiles, photography, and contemporary art, contributions by a group of scholars—and entries by the artist herself—illuminate Butler’s approach to color, use of African-print fabrics, and wide-ranging sources of inspiration. Offering an in-depth exploration of one of America's most innovative contemporary artists, this volume will serve as a primary resource that both introduces Butler’s work and establishes a scholarly foundation for future research.

Alabama Curiosities

Quirky Characters, Roadside Oddities & Other Offbeat Stuff

Author: Andy Duncan

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 195

Discover Alabama's curious underside with this oddly entertaining little guide! Travelers with a taste for the bizarre, tacky, and hilarious can visit the Coon Dog Cemetery, learn about the cattle-mutilation mystery, view the world's largest boll weevil, and sip Kudzu Tea. Only a true Southerner could capture the essence of these and other authentic Alabama phenomena, and Andy Duncan does his home state proud.

American Folk Art

A Regional Reference

Author: Kristin G. Congdon

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 728

View: 397

Folk art is as varied as it is indicative of person and place, informed by innovation and grounded in cultural context. The variety and versatility of 300 American folk artists is captured in this collection of informative and thoroughly engaging essays. * 300 essays on folk artists from all over the United States, organized alphabetically within geographical region * Introductory essays for each of the five regional sections * Numerous photographs of the works of many artists profiled * A glossary of over 100 terms, such as "quirts" and "whirlygigs" * A list of museums and galleries by region and a list of artists by media * An extensive bibliography including works from the fields of folklore, art history, and art criticism, as well as catalogs from major museum and gallery exhibitions

Space Unveiled

Invisible Cultures in the Design Studio

Author: Carla Jackson Bell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 262

View: 709

Since the early 1800s, African Americans have designed signature buildings; however, in the mainstream marketplace, African American architects, especially women, have remained invisible in architecture history, theory and practice. Traditional architecture design studio education has been based on the historical models of the Beaux-Arts and the Bauhaus, with a split between design and production teaching. As the result of current teaching models, African American architects tend to work on the production or technical side of building rather than in the design studio. It is essential to understand the centrality of culture, gender, space and knowledge in design studios. Space Unveiled is a significant contribution to the study of architecture education, and the extent to which it has been sensitive to an inclusive cultural perspective. The research shows that this has not been the case in American education because part of the culture remains hidden.