Practically Speaking

Author: J. Dan Rothwell

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Public speaking

Page:

View: 636

Practically Speaking

A Dictionary of Quotations on Engineering, Technology and Architecture

Author: C.C. Gaither

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 367

View: 781

For the first time in one easily accessible form, Practically Speaking: A Dictionary of Quotations on Engineering, Technology and Architecture brings together over 1,100 quotes pertinent and especially illuminating to these disciplines. Here you will find profound, witty, and wise quotations from the most famous to the unknown. The extensive author and subject indexes provide you with the prefect tool for locating quotations for practical use or pleasure. This book can be read for entertainment or used as a handy reference by students, professional engineers, and the more general public who are interested in who has said what on engineering, technology, and architecture.

The Trinity, Practically Speaking

Author: Frank D. Macchia

Publisher: InterVarsity Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 612

Three Gods, or One, or Three-in-One? Since the word Trinity does not appear in the Bible, many people wonder whether the doctrine is anything more than an intellectual puzzle created by theologians. This book takes readers on a guided tour of the logic leading to understanding God as a Trinity. The Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit in the Bible (and in Christian experience) are all vital to the reality of salvation. All three save. This point may not seem to be very significant until seen in the light of the basic premise of the entire Bible, namely, that only God can save (Hosea 13:4). There are benefits involved in understanding God as a communion of persons, a circle of love. God is no longer viewed as a distant judge removed from the sorrows of earthly existence. Salvation can be seen as more than mere forgiveness of sins. It also involves a life-transforming communion of divine love. A robust understanding of the Trinity fosters a more full and transformed Christian life.

Practically Speaking

A Practical Guide to Learning the American Accent

Author: Troy Mackinder

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Americanisms

Page: 125

View: 502

"For Australian and New Zealand actors to learn the Standard American Accent."--Provided by publisher.

Practically Speaking

Language, Literacy, and Academic Development for Students with AAC Needs

Author: Gloria Soto

Publisher: Brookes Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 344

View: 587

Draws on the knowledge of twenty-two professionals to offer guidelines, strategies, and tools for addressing the needs of students who suffer from communication challenges.

Organic Chemistry, Loose-Leaf Print Companion

Author: David R. Klein

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 1312

View: 679

Organic Chemistry, 3rd Edition offers success in organic chemistry requires mastery in two core aspects: fundamental concepts and the skills needed to apply those concepts and solve problems. Students must learn to become proficient at approaching new situations methodically, based on a repertoire of skills. These skills are vital for successful problem solving in organic chemistry. Existing textbooks provide extensive coverage of the principles but there is far less emphasis on the skills needed to actually solve problems.

Practically Speaking

Community College Practices That Help (Re)define Student Success. A Practitioner Primer. Spring 2014

Author: Darla Cooper

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 161

View: 669

This primer introduces 23 practices designed to support students inside and outside of the classroom and increase their community college success. These case studies illustrate the five themes for effective student support that emerged from Student Support (Re)defined--a multi-year study performed by the Research and Planning Group for California Community Colleges (RP Group). Through Student Support (Re)defined, the RP Group conducted phone surveys and focus groups to ask almost 900 students from 13 California community colleges what supports their educational success. Findings from this research indicate that: (1) colleges need to foster students' motivation; (2) colleges must teach students how to succeed in the postsecondary environment; (3) colleges need to structure support to ensure all six success factors are addressed; (4) colleges need to provide comprehensive support to historically underserved students to prevent the equity gap from growing; and (5) everyone has a role to play in supporting student achievement, but faculty must take the lead. This primer is not a research report. Rather, it offers a range of practical examples and aims to inspire concrete dialog about what community college practitioners can do to strengthen student support at the individual, program and institutional levels. Some practices offer simple ideas that can be readily pursued. Others are more complex, call for careful coordination and planning, and require a significant investment of time and resources. All practices are student-centered and either show potential for scaling and/or replication or are already successfully reaching significant numbers of learners. The RP Group selected these practices based on over 20 years of experience conducting research in the California community college system and drew on the research team and project advisory committee's engagement with national initiatives such as the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, Completion by Design, the Hewlett Leaders in Student Success Award and Excelencia in Education. Each case study includes a brief description of the practice's purpose and design, a discussion of the participant experience, implementation support and challenges, and a consideration of scalability and sustainability. The primer includes a bookmarked table of contents and a series of quick guides at the beginning of the document to help readers connect with the practices that are of greatest interest and relevance to their work. It incorporates discussion questions throughout the document designed to help practitioners reflect on their own college's practices, consider ways to strengthen existing supports and/or begin planning for the adoption of new approaches that promote the success of all learners on campus. The primer additionally offers an introduction to the Student Support (Re)defined study and the student voices that the RP Group has presented to thousands of practitioners, leaders and other stakeholders around California. (Contains 23 references and two sets of discussion questions designed for practitioner and college leadership engagement in the study's findings.).

Practically Speaking

A Sourcebook for Instructional Consultants in Higher Education

Author: Kathleen T. Brinko

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 350

View: 289

The selections in this sourcebook offer a blend of research-based principles and practical advice to the instructional consultant. The first section, Skills and Techniques of Instructional Consultation, contains: (1) The Interactions of Teaching Improvement (Kathleen T. Brink); (2) Instructional Consulting: A Guide for Developing Professional Knowledge (L. Dee Fink); (3) The Creative Art of Effective Consultation (Laura L. B. Border); (4) The First Meeting with the Client (Bette LeSere Erickson and Mary Deane Sorcinelli); (5) Collecting Information Using Class Observation (Karron Lewis); (6) Small Group Methods for Collecting Information from Students (Richard Tiberius); (7) Collecting Information Using Videotape (Eric Kristensen); (8) Collecting Information Using Student Ratings (Michael Theall and Jennifer Franklin); (9) Data Review and Follow-Up Consultation (Bette LeSere Erickson and Mary Deane Sorcinelli); (10) Collaborative Consultation for International Faculty (Erin Porter and Ghislaine Kozuh); and (11) Consulting with Faculty in Small Groups (William C. Rando). Part 2, Programmatic Approaches to Instructional Consultation, contains: (12) Overview of Instructional Consultation in North America (Diane E. Morrison); (13) Microteaching, Teaching Laboratory, and Alliances for Change (Richard Tiberius); (14) Partners in Learning: Breaking Down the Barriers around Teaching (Myrna Smith); (15) Small Group Instructional Diagnosis (SGID) (Lisa Firing Lenze); (16) Instructional Skills Workshop Program: A Peer-Based Model for the Improvement of Teaching and Learning (Judy Wilbee); (17) The Teaching Improvement Process (Mary Deane Sorcinelli); and (18) Consideration in Setting Up a Peer Consultant Program (Michael Kerwin). Part 3, The Context of Instructional Consultation, contains: (19) Higher Education in North America (Charles Claxton); (20) Local Variables That Affect Consultation (Diane E. Morrison); (21) Variability among Faculty (Mary Ann Shea); (22) Faculty Face Student Diversity (Milton G. Spann, Jr. and Suella McCrimmon); (23) Effects of Classroom Environments (Gabriele Bauer); (24) Identifying and Assessing Your Consultation Style (Laura L. B. Border); (25) Developmental Stages of an Educational Consultant: Theoretical Perspective (Richard Tiberius, Jane Tipping, and Ronald Smith); and (26) A Personal Account of the Development of One Consultant (David Way). Part 4, Evaluating Instructional Consultation, contains: (27) Issues in Evaluating Consultation (Glenn R. Erickson); (28) Evaluating a Teaching Consultation Service (Glenn R. Erickson); and (29) Evaluating a Consultation Program for Part-Time Adjunct Faculty (Barbara J. Millis). The final section, Training Instructional Consultants, contains: (30) Instructional Consultants as Reflective Practitioners (Ronald Smith); (31) Training New Consultants in the Connecticut Community-Technical College System (Bill Searle and Patricia A. Cook); (32) Training New Consultants in the Kentucky Community-College System: The Teaching Consultants Workshop (Michael Kerwin and Judy Rhoads); (33) Training TAs as Consultants at the University of Michigan: Workshop for Peer Mentors (Beverly Black and Bronwen Gates); (34) Professional Development for Consultants at the University of Washingtons Center for Instructional Development and Research (Jody D. Nyquist and Donald H. Wulff); (35) Training New Consultants at Stanford University: The TA Consultants Program (Michele Marincovich); (36) Reflecting on Practice: Observing Ourselves Consulting (Barbara Hofer, Beverly Black, and Linda Acitelli); (37) Using Case Studies To Train Instructional Consultants (Barbara J. Millis); and (38) Professional Organizations of Instructional Consultants (Kathleen T. Brinko). Each source contains references. (SLD)