The Indian English Novel

Nation, History, and Narration

Author: Priyamvada Gopal

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 209

View: 741

The Oxford Studies in Postcolonial Literatures series offers stimulating and accessible introductions to definitive topics and key genres and regions within the rapidly diversifying field of postcolonial literary studies in English. It is often claimed that unlike the British novel or the novel in indigenous Indian languages, Anglophone fiction in India has no genealogy of its own. Interrogating this received idea, Priyamvada Gopal shows how the English-language or Anglophone Indian novel is a heterogeneous body of fiction in which certain dominant trends and recurrent themes are, nevertheless, discernible. It is a genre that has been distinguished from its inception by a preoccupation with both history and nation as these come together to shape what scholars have termed 'the idea of India'. Structured around themes such as 'Gandhi and Fiction', 'The Bombay Novel', and 'The Novel of Partition', this study traces lines of influence across significant literary works and situates individual writers and texts in their historical context. Its emergence out of the colonial encounter and nation-formation has impelled the Anglophone novel to return repeatedly to the question: 'What is India?' In the most significant works of Anglophone fiction, 'India' emerges not just as a theme but as a point of debate, reflection, and contestation. Writers whose works are considered in their context include Rabindranath Tagore, Mulk Raj Anand, RK Narayan, Salman Rushdie, Nayantara Sahgal, Amitav Ghosh, Arundhati Roy, and Vikram Seth.

Postmodern Indian English Literature

Author: Bijay Kumar Das

Publisher: Atlantic Publishers & Dist

ISBN:

Category: Anglo-Indian literature

Page: 162

View: 989

Postmodernism In Indian English Literature Refers To The Works Of Literature After 1980. If Raja Rao S Kanthapura (1938) Marks Modernism, Salman Rushdie S Midnight S Children (1981) And Nissim Ezekiel S Latter-Day Psalms (1982) Mark Postmodernism In Indian English Literature. In This Book, Dr. Bijay Kumar Das Has Analysed Postmodern Indian English Literature Genre-Wise Poetry, Novel, Short Story, Drama And Autobiography. This Is A Critical History Of Indian English Literature In The Postmodern Period, Meant For Students, Researchers As Well As Teachers Who Seek An Introduction To It.

Issues of Identity in Indian English Fiction

A Close Reading of Canonical Indian English Novels

Author: H. S. Komalesha

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 195

View: 834

Rapid developments in the fields of trade, market, commerce and telecommunication technologies, together with cultural confrontations at the global level are creating a paradigmatic shift in people's understanding of selfhood and identity. This book makes a serious attempt to trace and map out the making of contemporary post-national identities within the subcontinental cultural production of India and in its English Fiction. One of the structural ventures of this study is that these newer identities, which are basically fragmented, ruptured, hyphenated, and palimpsestic in nature, require new descriptions and new elaborations within the field of creative literature and literary criticism. In order to pursue its research on these lines, the present work contrasts the notion of subjecthood and identity with the earlier phases of Indian cultural imagination as represented in some of the pioneering works of Indian English Fiction that have now attained a canonical status. By analysing some of the predominant concerns that work as leitmotif in most of the Indian English novels, the book brings together and reinterprets some problematic concepts such as history, culture, religion, nation and nationalism and creates a theoretical axis upon which it charts insightful and engaging aspects of selfhood and identity.

Post-independence Indian English Fiction

Author: Rajeshwar Mittapalli

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Indic fiction (English)

Page: 197

View: 918

This Anthology Puts Together Some Of The Finest Articles That Discuss Themes Which Frequently Figure In Current Literary Debates Centring Round Post-Independence Indian English Fiction: Reinterpretation Of Indian History In Artistic Terms, Re-Evaluation Of Indian Culture, Postcolonial Representation Of India In Fiction, Nation And National Identity, Diasporic Indian Experience And Intertextuality. It Thus Attempts A Critical Stock Taking Of The Indian English Fiction Of The Fifty Years Since Independence From These Fresh Perspectives.Almost All The Important Novelists Of The Three Generations Have Been Studied In This Anthology: Raja Rao, R.K. Narayan, Manohar Malgonkar, Anita Desai, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Arun Joshi, Kamala Markandaya, Shashi Deshpande, Khushwant Singh, Gita Mehta, Vikram Chandra, Mukul Kesavan, Arudhati Roy And Gita Hariharan.Contributing To This Volume Are Some Of The Best Scholars Like Ragini Ramachandra, Antony Johae, Rama Kundu, M. Mani Meitei, D. Maya, Corrado Micheli And Christopher Rollason.

Secularism in the Postcolonial Indian Novel

National and Cosmopolitan Narratives in English

Author: Neelam Srivastava

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 877

First Published in 2007. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Indian Genre Fiction

Pasts and Future Histories

Author: Bodhisattva Chattopadhyay

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 212

View: 582

This volume maps the breadth and domain of genre literature in India across seven languages (Tamil, Urdu, Bangla, Hindi, Odia, Marathi and English) and nine genres for the first time. Over the last few decades, detective/crime fiction and especially science fiction/fantasy have slowly made their way into university curricula and consideration by literary critics in India and the West. However, there has been no substantial study of genre fiction in the Indian languages, least of all from a comparative perspective. This volume, with contributions from leading national and international scholars, addresses this lacuna in critical scholarship and provides an overview of diverse genre fictions. Using methods from literary analysis, book history and Indian aesthetic theories, the volume throws light on the variety of contexts in which genre literature is read, activated and used, from political debates surrounding national and regional identities to caste and class conflicts. It shows that Indian genre fiction (including pulp fiction, comics and graphic novels) transmutes across languages, time periods, in translation and through publication processes. While the book focuses on contemporary postcolonial genre literature production, it also draws connections to individual, centuries-long literary traditions of genre literature in the Indian subcontinent. Further, it traces contested hierarchies within these languages as well as current trends in genre fiction criticism. Lucid and comprehensive, this book will be of great interest to academics, students, practitioners, literary critics and historians in the fields of postcolonialism, genre studies, global genre fiction, media and popular culture, South Asian literature, Indian literature, detective fiction, science fiction, romance, crime fiction, horror, mythology, graphic novels, comparative literature and South Asian studies. It will also appeal to the informed general reader.

Terrorism, Insurgency and Indian-English Literature, 1830-1947

Author: Alex Tickell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 433

In this ground-breaking interdisciplinary study of terrorism, insurgency and the literature of colonial India, Alex Tickell re-envisages the political aesthetics of empire. Organized around key crisis moments in the history of British colonial rule such as the ‘Black Hole’ of Calcutta, the anti-thug campaigns of the 1830s, the 1857 Rebellion, anti-colonial terrorism in Edwardian London and the Amritsar massacre in 1919, this timely book reveals how the terrorizing threat of violence mutually defined discursive relations between colonizer and colonized. Based on original research and drawing on theoretical work on sovereignty and the exception, this book examines Indian-English literary traditions in transaction and covers fiction and journalism by both colonial and Indian authors. It includes critical readings of several significant early Indian works for the first time: from neglected fictions such as Kylas Chunder Dutt’s story of anticolonial rebellion A Journal of Forty-Eight Hours of the Year 1945 (1835) and Sarath Kumar Ghosh’s nationalist epic The Prince of Destiny (1909) to dissident periodicals like Hurrish Chunder Mookerji’s Hindoo Patriot (1856–66) and Shyamaji Krishnavarma’s Indian Sociologist (1905–14). These are read alongside canonical works by metropolitan and ‘Anglo-Indian’ authors such as Philip Meadows Taylor’s Confessions of a Thug (1839), Rudyard Kipling’s short fictions, and novels by Edmund Candler and E. M. Forster. Reflecting on the wider cross-cultural politics of terror during the Indian independence struggle, Tickell also reappraises sacrificial violence in Indian revolutionary nationalism and locates Gandhi’s philosophy of ahimsa or non-violence as an inspired tactical response to the terror-effects of colonial rule.

The Oxford English Literary History: Volume 13: 1948-2000: The Internationalization of English Literature

Author: Bruce King

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 400

View: 343

In the future, what will 'English Literary History' mean? A literary history of England, or one with much looser boundaries, defined only by a communality of language, not by location or history? In this, the last volume in the Oxford English Literary History, Bruce King discusses the literature written by those who have chosen to make England their home since 1948. Ranging through Black and Asian British prose, poetry and drama, and writers including V. S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, Hanif Kureishi, and Zadie Smith, King reveals the development of the literature from writing about immigration to becoming English. This bold and challenging account of British culture will shape debate for future generations.

A History of the Indian Novel in English

Author: Ulka Anjaria

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 446

View: 148

A History of the Indian Novel in English traces the development of the Indian novel from its beginnings in the late nineteenth century up until the present day. Beginning with an extensive introduction that charts important theoretical contributions to the field, this History includes extensive essays that shed light on the legacy of English in Indian writing. Organized thematically, these essays examine how English was "made Indian" by writers who used the language to address specifically Indian concerns. Such concerns revolved around the question of what it means to be modern as well as how the novel could be used for anti-colonial activism. By the 1980s, the Indian novel in English was a global phenomenon, and India is now the third largest publisher of English-language books. Written by a host of leading scholars, this History invites readers to question conventional accounts of India's literary history.

Twentieth-Century Caribbean Literature

Critical Moments in Anglophone Literary History

Author: Alison Donnell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 288

View: 392

This bold study traces the processes by which a ‘history’ and canon of Caribbean literature and criticism have been constructed. It offers a supplement to that history by presenting new writers, texts and critical moments that help to reconfigure the Caribbean tradition. Focusing on Anglophone or Anglocreole writings from across the twentieth century, Alison Donnell asks what it is that we read when we approach ‘Caribbean Literature’, how it is that we read it and what critical, ideological and historical pressures may have influenced our choices and approaches. In particular, the book: * addresses the exclusions that have resulted from the construction of a Caribbean canon * rethinks the dominant paradigms of Caribbean literary criticism, which have brought issues of anti-colonialism and nationalism, migration and diaspora, ‘double-colonised’ women, and the marginalization of sexuality and homosexuality to the foreground * seeks to put new issues and writings into critical circulation by exploring lesser-known authors and texts, including Indian Caribbean women’s writings and Caribbean queer writings. Identifying alternative critical approaches and critical moments, Twentieth-Century Caribbean Literature allows us to re-examine the way in which we read not only Caribbean writings, but also the literary history and criticism that surround them.

Postcolonial Writing in the Era of World Literature

Texts, Territories, Globalizations

Author: Baidik Bhattacharya

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 188

View: 648

This book explores the debates surrounding two dynamic fields – postcolonial studies and world literature. Contrary to many dominant narratives in critical theory, it asserts that as an analytical framework the idea of world literature is dead: the nineteenth-century ideal of world literature had always and already been embedded in colonial histories; and also because whatever promise that ideal held out has been exhausted by postcolonial Anglophone literature. Through fresh and incisive readings of the postcolonial canon and some of its most prominent authors like Rudyard Kipling, V.S. Naipaul, J.M. Coetzee, and Salman Rushdie, the volume discusses how these Anglophone writings have used the banal and ordinary ideal of world literature to fashion out their own trajectories. Ambitious in scope, this book challenges many of the existing theoretical and literary frameworks and offers a radical reimagination of the fields. The volume, written in an accessible and lively prose, will be indispensable for scholars and researchers of literature, critical theory, postcolonial studies, cultural studies, and comparative literature.

The Internationalization of English Literature

Author: Bruce King

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 386

View: 846

The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more. Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The series will enlighten and inspire not only everyone studying, teaching, and researching in English Literature, but all serious readers. In the future will there be a literary history of England, or will it be an English-language literary history? This important volume in the new Oxford English Literary History covers colonial, postcolonial, and immigrant writers since 1948. After the wave of decolonization following World War II and the growth of large immigrant communities in England, Bruce King asks the questions: Can we still talk of the English nation as a cultural unit? What does it mean to be British, English, or national? In his broad-ranging discussion, he covers such topics as Black British Poetry and Drama, Commonwealth Literature, and British African Literature, and looks in depth at writers such as V. S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, Hanif Kureishi, and Zadie Smith. King writes from the conviction that it is wrong to assume that national cultures are finished. As he lucidly and persuasively demonstrates, a large, accomplished, socially significant body of writing in England sits between and overlaps with an older British tradition and its various sub-divisions, new national literatures, a post-imperial Commonwealth tradition, and contemporary global literature.

South-Asian Fiction in English

Contemporary Transformations

Author: Alex Tickell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 279

View: 807

This collection offers an essential, structured survey of contemporary fictions of South Asia in English, and includes specially commissioned chapters on each of the national traditions of the region. It covers less well known writings from Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh as well as the more firmly established canon of contemporary Indian literature, and features chapters on important new and emergent forms such as the graphic novel, genre fiction and the short story. It also contextualizes some key ‘transformative’ aspects of recent fiction such as border and diaspora identities; new middle-class narratives and popular genres; and literary response to terror and conflict. Edited and designed with researchers and students in mind, the book updates existing criticism and represents a readable guide to a dynamic, rapidly changing area of global literature.

Colonial and Postcolonial Literature

Migrant Metaphors

Author: Elleke Boehmer

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 351

View: 410

Offers an introduction to the growth area of colonial and postcolonial writing in English. This book combines a contextualising narrative situating key developments in imperial and postcolonial history, with theoretical readings of key texts that illuminate important concepts and definitions, including 'writing back' and 'mimicry'.

Postcolonial Literature

An Introduction

Author: Pramod K. Nayar

Publisher: Pearson Education India

ISBN:

Category: English literature

Page: 295

View: 175

Postcolonial Studies

An Anthology

Author: Pramod K. Nayar

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 688

View: 518

This new anthology brings together the most diverse and recent voices in postcolonial theory to emerge since 9/11, alongside classic texts in established areas of postcolonial studies. Brings fresh insight and renewed political energy to established domains such as nation, history, literature, and gender Engages with contemporary concerns such as globalization, digital cultures, neo-colonialism, and language debates Includes wide geographical coverage – from Ireland and India to Israel and Palestine Provides uniquely broad coverage, offering a full sense of the tradition, including significant essays on science, technology and development, education and literacy, digital cultures, and transnationalism Edited by a distinguished postcolonial scholar, this insightful volume serves scholars and students across multiple disciplines from literary and cultural studies, to anthropology and digital studies

Encyclopedia of Post-Colonial Literatures in English

Author: Eugene Benson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1676

View: 435

Post-Colonial Literatures in English, together with English Literature and American Literature, form one of the three major groupings of literature in English, and, as such, are widely studied around the world. Their significance derives from the richness and variety of experience which they reflect. In three volumes, this Encyclopedia documents the history and development of this body of work and includes original research relating to the literatures of some 50 countries and territories. In more than 1,600 entries written by more than 600 internationally recognized scholars, it explores the effect of the colonial and post-colonial experience on literatures in English worldwide.

Current Perspectives in Indian English Literature

Author: Gauri Shankar Jha

Publisher: Atlantic Publishers & Dist

ISBN:

Category: Indic fiction (English)

Page: 202

View: 133

Indian Writing In English Has Undoubtedly Acquired Its Own Independent Identity; It No More Remains Mere Imitative And Derivative. Its Long Journey From Colonial To Post-Colonial, From Imperial To Democratic And From English To Hinglish Forms A Remarkable Chapter In The History Of World Literature. Tagore Earned The First Recognition And Naipaul Is The Recent Laureate. In Between These Nobel Laureates Came A Number Of Writers Whose Work Earned Worldwide Appreciation.The Present Book Is An Attempt To Present The Different Genres Of Indian Writing In English. It Aims At Tracing Its Distinctive Features, Such As Cultural Alienation, Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Modernism Etc. While Nehru Has Furnished The Best English To The Globe, Amitav Ghosh, Shashi Tharoor, Arundhati Roy, Shiv K. Kumar And Dattani Have Stirred The West With Their Great Works. The Works Of These Renowned Literary Figures Have Been Considered Thoroughly And Meticulously In The Present Book.It Is Hoped That While The Student Community Will Find It Easily Accessible, The Teachers Will Also Consider It Exciting Study Material.

Indian English and the Fiction of National Literature

Author: Rosemary Marangoly George

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 294

View: 662

During the twentieth century, at the height of the independence movement and after, Indian literary writing in English was entrusted with the task of consolidating the image of a unified, seemingly caste-free, modernising India for consumption both at home and abroad. This led to a critical insistence on the proximity of the national and the literary, which in turn, led to the canonisation of certain writers and themes and the dismissal of others. Examining English anthologies of 'Indian literature', as well as the establishment of the Sahitya Akademi (the national academy of letters) and the work of R. K. Narayan and Mulk Raj Anand among others, Rosemary George exposes the painstaking efforts that went into the elaboration of a 'national literature' in English for independent India even while deliberating the fundamental limitations of using a nation-centric critical framework for reading literary works.