Porphyry in Fragments

Author: Ariane Magny

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 204

View: 188

The Greek philosopher Porphyry of Tyre had a reputation as the fiercest critic of Christianity. It was well-deserved: he composed (at the end the 3rd century A.D.) fifteen discourses against the Christians, so offensive that Christian emperors ordered them to be burnt. We thus rely on the testimonies of three prominent Christian writers to know what Porphyry wrote. Scholars have long thought that we could rely on those testimonies to know Porphyry's ideas. Exploring early religious debates which still resonate today, Porphyry in Fragments argues instead that Porphyry's actual thoughts became mixed with the thoughts of the Christians who preserved his ideas, as well as those of other Christian opponents.

Porphyry in Fragments

Reception of an Anti-Christian Text in Late Antiquity

Author: Ariane Magny

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 202

View: 251

The Greek philosopher Porphyry of Tyre had a reputation as the fiercest critic of Christianity. It was well-deserved: he composed (at the end the 3rd century A.D.) fifteen discourses against the Christians, so offensive that Christian emperors ordered them to be burnt. We thus rely on the testimonies of three prominent Christian writers to know what Porphyry wrote. Scholars have long thought that we could rely on those testimonies to know Porphyry's ideas. Exploring early religious debates which still resonate today, Porphyry in Fragments argues instead that Porphyry's actual thoughts became mixed with the thoughts of the Christians who preserved his ideas, as well as those of other Christian opponents.

Porphyry’s Place in the Neoplatonic Tradition

A Study in Post-Plotinian Neoplatonism

Author: A. Smith

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 173

View: 923

This book is a slightly emended version of a dissertation presented at the University of Hull in 1972. I realise only too well the deficiencies of style, presentation and material which this involves. The title implies a more final note than I had intended in my treatment of Porphyry. On reflexion, however, it seemed the most suited to convey the general purpose of my enquiries. A more rounded assessment of Porphyry can come only after some more basic work has been completed. An edition of his philosophical fragments, to which I am now turning my attention, is a prerequisite. lowe, of course, a great deal to all those who have written on Neo platonism. I am particularly indebted to Prof. Willy Theiler under whose guidance I studied in Bern. Conversation with him always resulted in new directions of enquiry and I was constantly stimulated by his breadth of knowledge. I must also thank Prof. A. H. Armstrong who has constantly encouraged me and helped me to look more deeply into a number of problems. Welcome, too, was a detailed criticism of Part Two by Dr. R. T. Wallis. Their criticism and advice have not always been followed and the responsibility for the faults and weak nesses of this book rests on myself.

Porphyry's Against the Christians

The Literary Remains

Author: Porphyry

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 181

View: 950

Prominent among the pagan critics of the early Christians was Porphyry of Trre (ca. 232-305), scholar, philosopher, and student of religions. His Against the Christians, condemned to be burned in 448, was a work of admirable historical criticism. The surviving fragments of this work, newly translated by Biblical scholar Hoffmann, present Porphyry's most trenchant comments on key figures, beliefs, and doctrines of Christianity.

Porphyry Against the Christians

Author: Robert M. Berchman

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 242

View: 772

Porphyry's "Against the Christians" offers an important example of Hellenic Biblical criticism and a critique of Christianity at the close of Late Antiquity, fl. 300 C.E.

Philosophy in Late Antiquity

Author: Andrew Smith

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 151

View: 938

Philosophy in Late Antiquity provides an essential new introduction to the key ideas of the Neoplatonists, which affected approaches to Plato as late as the nineteenth century. Andrew Smith shows how they influenced Christian thought and his approach not only allows us to appreciate these philosophical ideas in their own right, but it also gives us significant insights into the mentality of the age which produced them.

Religion and Identity in Porphyry of Tyre

The Limits of Hellenism in Late Antiquity

Author: Aaron P. Johnson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 374

View: 590

Examines Porphyry of Tyre's critical engagement with Hellenism in late antiquity, emphasizing philosophical translation as the key to his thought.

The Geology of New Hampshire: (pt. 2) Stratigraphical geology

Author: New Hampshire. Geological and Mineralogical Survey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Botany

Page:

View: 535

Vol. 1 includes a history of exploration in the White Mountains by Warren Upham; The distribution of insects, by Samuel H. Scudder; The distribution of plants, by William F. Flint; and a natural history of the Diatomaceae by A. Mead Edwards.

Assembling Early Christianity

Trade, Networks, and the Letters of Dionysios of Corinth

Author: Cavan W. Concannon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 630

In this book, Cavan W. Concannon explores the growth and development of Christianity in the second century. He focuses on Dionysios of Corinth, an early Christian bishop who worked to build a network of churches along trade routes in the eastern Mediterranean. Using archaeological evidence, and analysing Dionysios' fragmentary letter collection, Concannon shows how various networks and collectives assembled together, and how various Christianities emerged and coexisted as a result of tenuous and shifting networks. Dionysios' story also overlaps with key early Christian debates, notably issues of celibacy, marriage, re-admission of sinners, Roman persecution, and the economic and political interdependence of churches, which are also explored in this study. Concannon's volume thus offers new insights into a fluid, emergent Christianity at a pivotal moment of its evolution.