Political Changes in Taiwan Under Ma Ying-jeou

Partisan Conflict, Policy Choices, External Constraints and Security Challenges

Author: Jean-Pierre Cabestan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 308

View: 684

In 2008 Ma Ying-jeou was elected President of Taiwan, and the Kuomintang (KMT) returned to power after eight years of rule by the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP). Since taking power, the KMT has faced serious difficulties, as economic growth has been sluggish, society has been polarised over issues of identity and policy, and rapprochement between Taipei and Beijing has met with suspicion or reservation among large segments of Taiwanese society. Indeed, while improved relations with the United States have bolstered Taiwan’s security, warming cross-Strait relations have in turn made Taiwan more dependent upon and vulnerable to an increasingly powerful China. This book provides a comprehensive analysis of the return of the Kuomintang (KMT) to power, and examines the significant domestic political, economic, social and international challenges and changes that have characterized Taiwan since 2008. It identifies the major domestic, cross-Strait and foreign policy trends, and addresses key issues such as elections and Taiwan’s party system; the role of the presidency and legislature; economic development; social movements; identity politics; developments in cross-Strait relations; Taiwan’s security environment and national defence policies; relations with the US and Japan. In turn, the contributors look towards the final years of Ma’s presidency and beyond, and the structural realities – both domestic and external – that will shape Taiwan’s future. Political Changes in Taiwan Under Ma Ying-jeou will be of great interest to students and scholars of Taiwan studies, comparative politics, international relations, and economics. It will also appeal to policy makers working in the field.

Development and Demographic Change in Taiwan

Author: Roger Mark Selya

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 457

View: 481

This book describes and analyzes the demographic changes that took place in Taiwan between 1945 and 1995. It uses an interdisciplinary methodology so that different approaches to demographic change can be compared and contrasted. It attempts to evaluate Taiwan's experience so that lessons for the Third World can be extracted. The content and presentation of the material are deliberately designed to replicate the 1954 work of Barclay, Demographic Change and Colonial Development in Taiwan. As such the book seeks to provide the reasons that economic development without demographic change took place under the Japanese while development with demographic change took place under the Chinese. The volume is richly illustrated with some 82 original maps and graphs.

Party Politics in Taiwan

Party Change and the Democratic Evolution of Taiwan, 1991-2004

Author: Dafydd Fell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 200

View: 813

In 1991 Taiwan held its first fully democratic election. This first single volume of party politics in Taiwan analyzes the evolution of party competition in the country, looking at how Taiwan’s parties have adjusted to their new multi-party election environment. It features key chapters on: the development of party politics in Taiwan the impact of party change on social welfare, corruption and national identity party politics in the DPP era. Including interviews with high-ranking Taiwanese politicians and material on the 2004 Presidential election, this important work brings the literature up-to-date. It provides a valuable resource for scholars of Chinese and Taiwanese politics and a welcome addition to the field of regime transition and democratization.

Taiwan's Democracy on Trial

Political Change During the Chen Shui-bian Era and Beyond

Author: John F. Copper

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 118

View: 802

This book assesses the process of democratization in Taiwan during the Chen Shui-bian Era and after. He shows that in several respects, press freedom, human rights, ethnic relations, political reform, constitutionalism, and clean governance, democratization regressed. Economic management was not good and relations with the United States were severely strained.

Government and Politics in Taiwan

Author: Dafydd Fell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 312

View: 984

Written by an experienced teacher and scholar, this new and revised second edition of Government and Politics in Taiwan introduces students to the big questions concerning change and continuity in Taiwanese politics and governance. Taking a critical approach, Dafydd Fell provides students with the essential background to the history and development of the political system, as well as an explanation of the key structures, processes and institutions that have shaped Taiwan over the last few decades. Using key features such as suggestions for further reading and end-of-chapter study questions, this textbook covers: • the transition to democracy and party politics; • cross-Strait relations and foreign policy; • electoral politics and voting; • social movements; • national identity; • gender politics. Having been fully updated to take to take stock of the 2012 and 2016 General Elections, the Sunflower Movement and new developments in cross-Strait relations, this is an essential text for any course on Taiwanese politics, Chinese politics and East Asian politics.

Taiwan's Electoral Politics and Democratic Transition

Riding the Third Wave

Author: Hung-mao Tien

Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page:

View: 181

Taiwan's democratic transformation is gaining recognition by theorists and specialists as one of the world's most significant political development. Competitive election, competitive party system, and a functioning national legislature are crucial aspects of democratic development. This volume studies two major elections in Taiwan's post-authoritarian period since 1988, one on parliamentary election and the other elections of major and county executives. Analyses are deliberately broadened to include the most salient aspects of Taiwan politics that are related to elections, such as political parties, factions, business and politics, political culture, parliamentary politics, electoral system and voting behaviors. They provide a broad foundation for understanding Taiwan's political change and its future dynamic. The evolution of democratic politics in Taiwan, marked by the rise of a two-party system and genuine electoral competition, provides a unique case study of a successful progression from a politically authoritarian state to one with relative political freedom. The contributors to this book analyze the growth of Taiwan's competitive party system in the context of social attitudes, issue-based politics, and local factions. Highlights include: --Hung-mao Tien's examination of the changing dynamic between the Kuomintang and the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP); --Yun-han Chu's empirical study of coalition politics; --Bruce Dickson's discussion of party adaptation to changes in the social and political climate, and its ramification for the People's Republic of China; --T.J. Cheng's analysis of DPP factionalism and party realignment; --William L. Parish's survey research on Taiwan's political values.

Civil Society and Political Change in Asia

Expanding and Contracting Democratic Space

Author: Muthiah Alagappa

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 551

A systematic investigation of the connection between civil society and political change in Asia - change toward open, participatory, and accountable politics. Its findings suggest that the link between a vibrant civil society and democracy is indeterminate: certain civil society organizations support democracy; thers could undermine it.