Police and Community in Twentieth-Century Scotland

Author: Louise Jackson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 108

The first social history of Scottish policing from 1900 to the present day. This book will be the first to provide a much-needed history of the experience of policing in twentieth-century Scotland. Drawing on a wealth of archival materials, oral history interviews, memoir and autobiography, it examines the relationship between police officers and the diverse urban/rural communities they served against the backdrop of social and economic change, the ruptures of wartime, the impact of technology and the centralisation of governance. Through its analysis of the dynamics that created points of trust and co-operation as well as tension and conflict across time - with particular reference to gender, age, ethnicity and religion - it will contribute to broader current debates (outside of Scotland as well as within) about the significance of localism in assuring police legitimacy and delivering an effective service. Thus, it will also be the first book to offer a sustained historical analysis of the changing configuration of police-community relationships - from Victorian legacy to present day - highlighting patterns of chronological change as well as geographical variation. Based on rich collection of previously unused primary source materials; Provides geographical coverage of rural areas (including highlands and islands) as well as densely populated urban areas; Focuses on social identities and the dynamics shaping police-community relationships across time in order to contribute to debates about effective policing today; Contextualises Scottish experience in relation to broader comparative frameworks.

The Policing of Politics in the Twentieth Century

Historical Perspectives

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 262

View: 234

The role of the police has, from its beginnings, been ambiguous, even janus-faced. This volume focuses on one of its controversial aspects by showing how the police have been utilized in the past by regimes in Europe, the USA and the British Empire to check political dissent and social unrest. Ideologies such as anti-Communism emerge as significant influences in both democracies and dictatorships. And by shedding new light on policing continuities in twentieth-century Germany and Italy, as well as Interpol, this volume questions the compatibility of democratic government and political policing.

Twentieth-century Influences on Twenty-first-century Policing

Continued Lessons of Police Reform

Author: Jonathon A. Cooper

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Police

Page: 273

View: 642

This newly revised edition includes two new chapters exploring events in policing since 2014, and offers a compelling new direction to improve policing, today.

Police and Policing in the Twentieth Century

Author: Chris A. Williams

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 511

View: 607

Recent research has suggested that the label 'golden age' is an over-simplification of British policing between the mid-nineteenth century and the present. This volume reprints the classic articles which address issues such as: the structure and reform of the police organisation; the nature of the policing task; who carried out this task; and some of the crises and ongoing areas of concern faced by the police in this period.

Crime and Policing in the Twentieth Century

The South Wales Experience

Author: David J. V. Jones

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 910

This pioneering work is based on entirely original research. It gives a detailed assessment of the pattern of crime and of developments in policing during the twentieth century, a period for which little historical analysis of crime has been published. The author focuses upon a specific police authority area which typifies the challenges faced by the police in Britain this century. The area covered by the South Wales Police contains a rich tapestry of communities, from isolated, rural villages to urban industrial centres including Cardiff and Swansea. It has the geography of a county police force and some of the problems of a metropolitan police area. It also has some well preserved police records which have here been analysed in depth. This volume points up clearly the changes in the nature of crime and policing in the last hundred years. In 1900, the modern problems of motoring and drug offences, for example, were hardly mentioned, and police work early in the century was similar to that of fifty years earlier. The years of the late 1950s and 1960s witnessed major changes in criminal activity and transformed policing and public attitudes. This work will be vital for all those who need to set the current debates on crime, punishment and the performance of the police in a historical context and to trace the historical roots of today's fears, myths and prejudices.

Policing Twentieth Century Ireland

A History of An Garda Síochána

Author: Vicky Conway

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 703

The twentieth century was a time of rapid social change in Ireland: from colonial rule to independence, civil war and later the Troubles; from poverty to globalisation and the Celtic Tiger; and from the rise to the fall of the Catholic Church. Policing in Ireland has been shaped by all of these changes. This book critically evaluates the creation of the new police force, an Garda Síochána, in the 1920s and analyses how this institution was influenced by and responded to these substantial changes. Beginning with an overview of policing in pre-independence Ireland, this book chronologically charts the history of policing in Ireland. It presents data from oral history interviews with retired gardaí who served between the 1950s and 1990s, giving unique insight into the experience of policing Ireland, the first study of its kind in Ireland. Particular attention is paid to the difficulties of transition, the early encounters with the IRA, the policing of the Blueshirts, the world wars, gangs in Dublin and the growth of drugs and crime. Particularly noteworthy is the analysis of policing the Troubles and the immense difficulties that generated. This book is essential reading for those interested in policing or Irish history, but is equally important for those concerned with the legacy of colonialism and transition.

Crime and Society in Twentieth Century England

Author: Clive Emsley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 509

Crime and Society in Twentieth-Century England traces the broad pattern of criminal offending over a hundred year period that experienced unprecedented levels of upheaval and change. This period included two world wars, the end of the British Empire, significant shifts in both gender relations and ethnic mix and a decline in the power of the economy. In this new textbook, Professor Clive Emsley provides an up-to-date assessment of changes in attitudes to crime as well as of the developments in policing, in the courts and in penal sanctions over the course of the century. He explores the impact of growing gender equality and ethnic diversity on crime and criminal justice, and looks at the way in which crime became increasingly central to political agendas in the last third of the century. Written in a clear and accessible manner, the book examines: Perceptions of crime and criminality across the century Varieties of offending from murder to benefit fraud The role of the media in constructing and reinforcing the understanding of crime and the criminal The decline and demise of corporal and capital punishment The shift from largely progressive to more punitive penal practice The first serious attempt to explore the history of crime and criminal justice in twentieth-century England, this book will be an invaluable introduction to the student and interested general reader alike.

Conflict and Legality

Policing Mid-twentieth Century Europe

Author: Gerard Oram

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Criminal justice, Administration of

Page: 217

View: 911

Youth Squad

Policing Children in the Twentieth Century

Author: Tamara Gene Myers

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 253

View: 259

Starting in the 1930s, urban police forces from New York City to Montreal to Vancouver established youth squads and crime prevention programs, dramatically changing the nature of contact between cops and kids. Gone was the beat officer who scared children and threatened youth. Instead, a new breed of officer emerged whose intentions were explicit: befriend the rising generation. Good intentions, however, produced paradoxical results. In Youth Squad Tamara Gene Myers chronicles the development of youth consciousness among North American police departments. Myers shows that a new comprehensive strategy for crime prevention was predicated on the idea that criminals are not born but made by their cultural environments. Pinpointing the origin of this paradigmatic shift to a period of optimism about the ability of police to protect children, she explains how, by the middle of the twentieth century, police forces had intensified their presence in children's lives through juvenile curfew laws, police athletic leagues, traffic safety and anti-corruption campaigns, and school programs. The book describes the ways that seemingly altruistic efforts to integrate working-class youth into society evolved into pervasive supervision and surveillance, normalizing the police presence in children's lives. At the intersection of juvenile justice, policing, and childhood history, Youth Squad reveals how the overpolicing of young people today is rooted in well-meaning but misguided schemes of the mid-twentieth century.

Policing Futures

The Police, Law Enforcement and the Twenty-First Century

Author: Pamela Davies

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 129

This innovative book offers a comprehensive assessment of policing in late modern Britain. The overall theme is that as we approach the end of the twentieth century, it is an appropriate time to review recent developments in policing and law enforcement and to consider future prospects.The areas covered include equal opportunities and public policework; perspectives on and politics of police policy making; the emergence and consequences of managerialism and privatisation; legitimacy, policing and human rights; crime control and surveillance in Northern Ireland; crime rates, victimisation and the provision of service; risk, late modernity and 'community policing'; regulating virtual communities and policing cybercrime; and the insights to be gained from comparative analysis. Thought-provoking and incisive, Policing Futures is an invaluable source of information, and will be essential reading for students, lecturers, researchers and practitioners in the fields of police studies, criminology, socio-legal studies, law, sociology, social policy, social work and related disciplines.

Youth Squad

Policing Children in the Twentieth Century

Author: Tamara Gene Myers

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 227

How police surveillance and crime prevention programs became a normal part of modern-day childhood.

Policing Across the World

Issues for the Twenty-first Century

Author: R. I. Mawby

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 236

This text provides an overview of policing across different societies, and considers the issues facing the US and British police in an international context. The book is designed as an introduction to the police and the challenges they face.

Law Enforcement in Early-twentieth-century American Film

1900 to 1952

Author: George Beck

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Law enforcement

Page: 196

View: 198

What is commonly understood in America today as widespread law enforcement, or formal policing outside of the cities, appeared in the early twentieth century around the same time that the early film industry first developed. Thus modern law enforcement and film evolved closely in tandem, while also intersecting in meaningful ways. For the purpose of this study, this parallel, yet at times overlapping, history of early law enforcement and film provides an essential context for understanding how representations of law enforcement in early American cinema both influenced and refracted the public's perceptions of law enforcement, thus revealing a shift from views of law enforcement initially as a suspicious force to a power for the common good. Since the inception of film as a mechanism that transformed live entertainment into a recorded medium, social issues have found their way into cinematic narratives. Many early films notably include representations of both law enforcement and the justice system, and thus the American public's changing perceptions of police officers in the first half of the twentieth century can be analyzed from the early film archive. For this reason, each chapter in this study examines the depictions of law enforcement in several early twentieth-century American films, ranging from 1900 to 1952. The historical periods covered in this study range from the Progressive era through Prohibition, followed by the Depression and the seeming collapse of the American Dream, to the start of the Cold War, and finally, the post-WWII period when the United States was viewed as the newly crowned superpower of the world. Carefully selected films in these historical periods are analyzed in ways that trace the American public' changing perceptions of American law enforcement. While much scholarly attention focuses on the criminal in early cinema, as well as on how the film industry's censorship affected the kinds of films Americans viewed, there has been a relative lack of research into representations of law enforcement in film during the early-wentieth-century American cinema. Most notably absent is specific research on the criminal's antagonist--the police officer. Seeking to correct the lack of scholarly attention in this area, the research included in this study represents the first in-depth study of early law enforcement in early-twentieth-century American film, thereby also revealing the evolution of early law enforcement.

Old Time Policing

A History of How Policing Was in the Mid 20th Century

Author: Barrie Davies

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 144

View: 670

In the mid nineteen sixties the Author had progressed from being a country copper, a city copper to the C.I.D. and to the newly formed Crime Squad to combat the nationwide crime. He starts off by telling you of one of his experiences of undercover work in London and surrounding areas in the mid sixties, liasing with the Metropolitan Flying Squad, as a Crime Squad Officer and, wonders how he arrived there so, the story is then told of how his carreer began as a Copper. It is a story of the beginning of an adventure within a job, the training, the unusual, the standard of leadership, the equipment available, the real life of a Copper AS IT WAS THEN during the first three years of services as a Police Officer. Life is now so different in the 21st century.

Policing New Risks in Modern European History

Author: Xavier Rousseaux

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 106

View: 527

Authorities often fear societal change as it implies finding a new balance to live together within society. Whether it is defined by economic, political, social or cultural factors, the transformation of life in society is considered by authorities as a 'risk' that needs to be framed and controlled. The state's response to this situation of transformation can be analysed through the prism of the police. Informally or not, police systems adapt their regulatory frameworks, their structures and their practices in order to respond risks, new threats and new rules. This process, which is mostly of a contemporary nature, is also deeply historic. Analysing it on the long run is therefore particularly relevant. From the late nineteenth-century until the second half of the twentieth-century, Policing New Risks in Modern European History provides a panorama of political and police reactions to the 'risks' of societal change in a Western European perspective, focusing on Belgium, France, and The Netherlands, but also colonial perspectives.

The Irish Imperial Service

Policing Palestine and Administering the Empire, 1922–1966

Author: Seán William Gannon

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 293

View: 931

This book explores Irish participation in the British imperial project after ‘Southern’ Ireland’s independence in 1922. Building on a detailed study of the Irish contribution to the policing of the Palestine Mandate, it examines Irish imperial servants’ twentieth-century transnational careers, and assesses the influence of their Irish identities on their experience at the colonial interface. The factors which informed Irish enlistment in Palestine’s police forces are examined, and the impact of Irishness on the personal perspectives and professional lives of Irish Palestine policemen is assessed. Irish policing in Palestine is placed within the broader tradition of the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC)-conducted imperial police service inaugurated in the mid-nineteenth century, and the RIC’s transnational influence on twentieth-century British colonial policing is evaluated. The wider tradition of Irish imperial service, of which policing formed part, is then explored, with particular focus on British Colonial Service recruitment in post-revolutionary Ireland and twentieth-century Irish-imperial identities.

Youth Squad : Policing Children in the Twentieth Century

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 798

Starting in the 1930s, urban police forces from New York City to Montreal to Vancouver established youth squads and crime prevention programs, dramatically changing the nature of contact between cops and kids. Gone was the beat officer who scared children and threatened youth. Instead, a new breed of officer emerged whose intentions were explicit: befriend the rising generation. Good intentions, however, produced paradoxical results. In Youth Squad Tamara Gene Myers chronicles the development of youth consciousness among North American police departments. Myers shows that a new comprehensive strategy for crime prevention was predicated on the idea that criminals are not born but made by their cultural environments. Pinpointing the origin of this paradigmatic shift to a period of optimism about the ability of police to protect children, she explains how, by the middle of the twentieth century, police forces had intensified their presence in children's lives through juvenile curfew laws, police athletic leagues, traffic safety and anti-corruption campaigns, and school programs. The book describes the ways that seemingly altruistic efforts to integrate working-class youth into society evolved into pervasive supervision and surveillance, normalizing the police presence in children's lives. At the intersection of juvenile justice, policing, and childhood history, Youth Squad reveals how the overpolicing of young people today is rooted in well-meaning but misguided schemes of the mid-twentieth century.

Cop Knowledge

Police Power and Cultural Narrative in Twentieth-Century America

Author: Christopher P. Wilson

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 289

View: 798

Whether they appear in mystery novels or headline news stories, on prime-time TV or the silver screen, few figures have maintained such an extraordinary hold on the American cultural imagination as modern police officers. Why are we so fascinated with the police and their power? What relation do these pervasive media representations bear to the actual history of modern policing? Christopher P. Wilson explores these questions by examining narratives of police power in crime news, popular fiction, and film, showing how they both reflect and influence the real strategies of law enforcement on the beat, in the squad room, and in urban politics. He takes us from Theodore Roosevelt's year of reform with the 1890s NYPD to the rise of "community policing," from the classic "police procedural" film The Naked City to the bestselling novels of LAPD veteran Joseph Wambaugh. Wilson concludes by demonstrating the ways in which popular storytelling about police power has been intimately tied to the course of modern liberalism, and to the rising tide of neoconservatism today. "A thorough, brilliant blend that crosses disciplines."—Choice "[S]ophisticated, highly theoretical and ambitious. . . . Connects the history of policing to cultural representations of crime, criminals and cops."—Times Literary Supplement "[A] deeply satisfying approach to the crime narrative. . . . [Wilson] focuses, ultimately, on the role of police power in cultural storytelling."—American Quarterly

Women Police

Gender, Welfare and Surveillance in the Twentieth Century

Author: Louise Jackson

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 220

View: 174

Women Police examines the professional roles, identities, activities and everyday experiences of women employed within the UK police service since the First World War against a backdrop of social and cultural change.