Pocket Irish Poetry

Author: Fiona Biggs

Publisher: Gill Books

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 256

View: 332

This beautifully illustrated collection contains the greatest poems from the greatest Irish poets.

Northern Irish Poetry

The American Connection

Author: E. Kennedy-Andrews

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 812

Through discussion of the ways in which major Northern Irish poets (such as John Hewitt, Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley, Louis MacNeice and Derek Mahon) have been influenced by America, this study shows how Northern Irish poetry overspills national borders, complicating and enriching itself through cross-cultural interaction and hybridity.

Northern Irish Poetry and Domestic Space

Author: Adam Hanna

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 188

View: 824

Northern Irish Poetry and Domestic Space explores why houses, in some ways the most private of spaces, have taken up such visibly public positions in the work of a range of prominent poets from Northern Ireland, examining the work of Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley, Derek Mahon and Medbh McGuckian.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Poetry

Author: Fran Brearton

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 743

View: 763

Forty chapters, written by leading scholars across the world, describe the latest thinking on modern Irish poetry. The Handbook begins with a consideration of Yeats's early work, and the legacy of the 19th century. The broadly chronological areas which follow, covering the period from the 1910s through to the 21st century, allow scope for coverage of key poetic voices in Ireland in their historical and political context. From the experimentalism of Beckett, MacGreevy, and others of the modernist generation, to the refashioning of Yeats's Ireland on the part of poets such as MacNeice, Kavanagh, and Clarke mid-century, through to the controversially titled post-1969 'Northern Renaissance' of poetry, this volume will provide extensive coverage of the key movements of the modern period. The Handbook covers the work of, among others, Paul Durcan, Thomas Kinsella, Brendan Kennelly, Seamus Heaney, Paul Muldoon, Michael Longley, Medbh McGuckian, and Ciaran Carson. The thematic sections interspersed throughout - chapters on women's poetry, religion, translation, painting, music, stylistics - allow for comparative studies of poets north and south across the century. Central to the guiding spirit of this project is the Handbook's consideration of poetic forms, and a number of essays explore the generic diversity of poetry in Ireland, its various manipulations, reinventions and sometimes repudiations of traditional forms. The last essays in the book examine the work of a 'new' generation of poets from Ireland, concentrating on work published in the last two decades by Justin Quinn, Leontia Flynn, Sinead Morrissey, David Wheatley, Vona Groarke, and others.

Continuity and Change in Irish Poetry, 1966–2010

Author: Eric Falci

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 256

In this book, Eric Falci reshapes the story of Irish poetry since the 1960s. He shows how polemical arguments concerning the role of poetry in 1960s Ireland evolve into a set of formal and compositional strategies for emerging Irish poets in the mid 1970s and beyond. His study presents a cohesive picture of the relationship between Northern Irish poetry from the Republic of Ireland since World War II and traces the lineage of lyric practice from a unique historical perspective. At the same time, it recontextualizes late twentieth-century Irish poetry within the long Irish poetic tradition, places Irish writing more accurately within the field of postwar Anglophone poetry and offers a new account of lyric's critical capacities. Of interest to Irish studies and twentieth-century poetry specialists, this book provides a much-needed guide to some of the most inventive and notable poetry written in the past forty years.

Irish Poetry Since 1950

From Stillness Into History

Author: John Goodby

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 362

View: 383

Irish Poetry since 1950 is a survey of poetry, from Northern Ireland, the Republic, Britain, and the US. The five chapters of the book cover the 1950s, the 1960s, the early troubled period to 1976, the 1980s and the 1990s. Each poet is placed firmly within his or her historical and social contexts, with an emphasis on the response to the processes of modernization, the representation of violence, poetic form, and gender.

Irish Poetry After Joyce

Author: Dillon Johnston

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 922

William Butler Yeats has been long considered the standard by which all Irish poetry is judged. Even the best of his immediate successors could not be liberated from Yeats's influence. In a new edition of his groundbreaking work, Dillon Johnston elaborates on the premise that many of Ireland's new voices do not follow the Yeatsian model - the singular lyric or odic voice; rather, they rely on Joyce for an interplay of dramatic voices. Johnston describes the world that contemporary poets have inherited: the legacies of Yeats and Joyce, the conflict of Unionism and Nationalism, the Irish language itself, and the politics of literature after World War II. He then explores the poetry of successors to both Yeats and Joyce. Austin Clarke is paired with Thomas Kinsella, Patrick Kavanagh with Seamus Heaney, Denis Devlin with John Montague, and Louis MacNeice with Derek Mahon. This edition, encompassing major poets of the last fifty-five years, includes the work of Paul Muldoon, Richard Murphy, Eavan Boland, Medbh McGuckian, and Eilean Ni Chuilleanain.

The Cambridge Introduction to Modern Irish Poetry, 1800–2000

Author: Justin Quinn

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 810

Over the last two centuries, Ireland has produced some of the world's most outstanding and best-loved poets, from Thomas Moore to W. B. Yeats to Seamus Heaney. This introduction not only provides an essential overview of the history and development of poetry in Ireland, but also offers new approaches to aspects of the field. Justin Quinn argues that the language issues of Irish poetry have been misconceived and re-examines the divide between Gaelic and Anglophone poetry. Quinn suggests an alternative to both nationalist and revisionist interpretations and fundamentally challenges existing ideas of Irish poetry. This lucid book offers a rich contextual background against which to read the individual works, and pays close attention to the major poems and poets. Readers and students of Irish poetry will learn much from Quinn's sharp and critically acute account.

O'Brien Pocket History of Irish Traditional Music

Author: Gearóid Ó hAllmhuráin

Publisher: The O'Brien Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 192

View: 183

The history of Irish traditional music, song and dance from the mythological harp of the Dagda right up to Riverdance. Exploring an abundant spectrum of historical sources, music and folklore, this guide uncovers the contribution of the Normans to Irish dancing, the role of the music maker in Penal Ireland, as well as the popularity of dance tunes and set dancing from the end of the 18th century. It also follows the music of the Irish diaspora from as far apart as Newfoundland and the music halls of vaudeville to the musical tapestry of Irish America today.