Plato and the Individual (RLE: Plato)

Author: David Rankin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 4

View: 600

This book explores the life-history of the individual within the context of Plato’s social thought. The author examines Plato’s treatment of the principal crises in an individual life - birth, educational selection, sex, the individual’s contract with society, old age, death, and life after death – and provides an unprecedented analysis of Plato’s theory of genetics as it appears in the Timaeus. Comparisons are made with contemporary developments in anthropology, sociology, and comparative myth but without losing sight of the fact that Plato, whilst having much to say to the modern world, was not a modern.

Plato and the Individual

Author: Robert William Hall

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 713

In this study of Plato's theory of the individual, I propose to show that Plato is deeply concerned with the achievement by each person of the moral excellence appropriate to man. Plato exhibits profound interest in the moral well being of each individual, not merely those who are philosophically gifted. Obviously my study is in opposition with a traditional line of interpretation which holds that Plato evinces small concern for the ordinary individual, the "common man" of today. According to this interpretation Plato's chief interest, shown especially in the Republic, is with the philosophically endowed, whose knowledge penetrates to and embraces the realm of forms; this is a world which must remain for the common man an unfathomable mystery in its totality. Although he is unable to grasp the knowledge of the forms necessary for genuine morality, the ordinary individual may, if he is fortunate enough to live in a polis ruled by philosophers, gain a sort of secondary or "demotic" morality. Through the me chanical development of the right kind of habits, through faithful obedience to the decrees of the rulers and the laws of the polis, the many who are incapable of comprehending the true bases of morality will attain a second best, unreflective morality accompanied by happi ness.

Plato and the Individual (RLE: Plato)

Author: David Rankin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 4

View: 502

This book explores the life-history of the individual within the context of Plato’s social thought. The author examines Plato’s treatment of the principal crises in an individual life - birth, educational selection, sex, the individual’s contract with society, old age, death, and life after death – and provides an unprecedented analysis of Plato’s theory of genetics as it appears in the Timaeus. Comparisons are made with contemporary developments in anthropology, sociology, and comparative myth but without losing sight of the fact that Plato, whilst having much to say to the modern world, was not a modern.

Plato's Individuals

Author: Mary M. McCabe

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 360

View: 867

Contradicting the long-held belief that Aristotle was the first to discuss individuation systematically, Mary Margaret McCabe argues that Plato was concerned with what makes something a something and that he solved the problem in a radically different way than did Aristotle. McCabe explores the centrality of individuation to Plato's thinking, from the Parmenides to the Politicus, illuminating Plato's later metaphysics in an exciting new way. Tradition associates Plato with the contrast between the particulars of the sensible world and transcendent forms, and supposes that therein lies the center of Plato's metaphysical universe. McCabe rebuts this view, arguing that Plato's thinking about individuals--which informs all his thought--comes to focus on the tension between "generous" or complex individuals and "austere" or simple individuals. In dialogues such as the Theaetetus and the Timaeus Plato repeatedly poses the question of individuation but cannot provide an answer. Later, in the Sophist, the Philebus, and the Politicus, Plato devises what McCabe calls the "mesh of identity," an account of how individuals may be identified relative to each other. The mesh of identity, however, fails to explain satisfactorily how individuals are unified or made coherent. McCabe asserts that individuation may be absolute--and she questions philosophy's longtime reliance on Aristotle's solution.

The Posthumous Life of Plato

Author: F. Novotny

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 667

View: 282

Plato's earthly life ended in the year 347 B. C. At the same time, however, began his posthumous life - a life of great influence and fame leaving its mark on aU eras of the history of European learning -lasting until present times. Plato's philosophy has taken root earlier or later in innumerable souls of others, it has matured and given birth to new ideas whose proliferation further dissemi nated the vital force of the original thoughts. It happened sometimes, of course, that by various interpretations different and sometimes altogether contradictory thoughts were deduced from one and the same Platonic doctrine: this possibility is also characteristic of Plato's genius. Even though in the history of Platonism there were times less active and creative, the continuity of its tradition has never been completely interrupted and where there was no growth and progress, at least that what had been once accepted has been kept alive. When enquiring into Plato's influence on the development of learning, we shall above all consider the individual approach of various personalities to Plato's philosophy, personal Platonism, which at its best concerns itself with the literary heritage of Plato and though accessible was not always much sought for.

Understanding Plato's Republic

Author: Gerasimos Santas

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 979

Understanding Plato’s Republic is an accessible introduction to the concepts of justice that inform Plato’s Republic, elucidating the ancient philosopher's main argument that we would be better off leading just lives rather than unjust ones Provides a much needed up to date discussion of The Republic's fundamental ideas and Plato's main argument Discusses the unity and coherence of The Republic as a whole Written in a lively style, informed by over 50 years of teaching experience Reveals rich insights into a timeless classic that holds remarkable relevance to the modern world

The Individual and the Political Order

An Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy

Author: Norman E. Bowie

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 267

View: 832

Written in an accessible yet sophisticated style, The Individual and the Political Order, Third Edition is a text appropriate for students at all levels. This thoroughly revised edition challenges its readers to critically respond to a sustained defense of liberalism. Additions include examinations of communitarian and feminist critiques of liberalism, discussions of hate speech regulations, responses to the most recent work of Rawls, and a study of humanitarian intervention efforts in other countries. An expanded and updated bibliography as well as new study questions for each chapter make this an extremely useful text.

Between Moses and Plato

Individual and Society in Deuteronomy and Ancient Greek Law

Author: Anselm C. Hagedorn

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 351

View: 959

English summary: This study aims at an interpretation of the relationship between individual and the society as described in the laws of the book of Deuteronomy and equivalent documents from the ancient Greek world. German description: Die Beziehungen zwischen Individuum und Gesellschaft in den Gesetzestexten des Deuteronomiums (Dtn 2-5; 16-18; 20 und 21f.) und in legislativen wie auch literarischen antiken griechischen Texten werden erstmals in dieser interdisziplinaren und vergleichenden Studie untersucht, die zum Ergebnis kommt, dass es zwar kein einheitliches Gesetz im Mittelmeerraum gegeben habe, dafur aber immerhin gemeinsame Grunduberzeugungen, die sich auch in den Gesetzgebungen niederschlugen. Die Prasentation der bislang kaum bekannten griechischen Quellen verleiht dem Werk Editionscharakter.

Love and Friendship in Plato and Aristotle

Author: A. W. Price

Publisher: Clarendon Press

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 278

View: 584

This book fully explores for the first time an idea common to Plato and Aristotle, which unites their treatments - otherwise very different - of love and friendship. The idea is that although persons are separate, their lives need not be. One person's life may overflow into another's, and as such, helping another person is a way of serving oneself. The author shows how their view of love and friendship, within not only personal relationships, but also the household and even the city-state, promises to resolve the old dichotomy between egoism and altruism. - ;Friendship and desire in the Lysis; Love in the Symposium; Love in the Phaedrus; Perfect friendship in Aristotle; Aristotle on the varieties of friendship; The household; The City; Epilogue; Appendices; Homogeneity and beauty in the Symposium; Psychoanalysis looks at the Phaedrus ; Plato's sexual morality; Aristotle on erotic love; List of modern works cited. -

Complete Works

Author: Plato

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 1808

View: 385

Gathers translations of Plato's works and includes guidance on approaching their reading and study

Plato

And the Other Companions of Sokrates

Author: George Grote

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy, Ancient

Page: 602

View: 249

Plato's Ethics

Author: Terence Irwin

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 436

View: 613

Studies Plato's Republic and other dialogues.

Plato's Republic

the Greek text

Author: Plato

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Political science

Page:

View: 123

Genres in Dialogue

Plato and the Construct of Philosophy

Author: Andrea Wilson Nightingale

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 222

View: 935

This 1995 book takes as its starting point Plato's incorporation of specific genres of poetry and rhetoric into his dialogues. The author argues that Plato's 'dialogues' with traditional genres are part and parcel of his effort to define 'philosophy'. Before Plato, 'philosophy' designated 'intellectual cultivation' in the broadest sense. When Plato appropriated the term for his own intellectual project, he created a new and specialised discipline. In order to define and legitimise 'philosophy', Plato had to match it against genres of discourse that had authority and currency in democratic Athens. By incorporating the text or discourse of another genre, Plato 'defines' his new brand of wisdom in opposition to traditional modes of thinking and speaking. By targeting individual genres of discourse Plato marks the boundaries of 'philosophy' as a discursive and as a social practice.