Plants of the Gods

Their Sacred, Healing, and Hallucinogenic Powers

Author: Richard Evans Schultes

Publisher: Healing Arts Press

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 208

View: 862

World-renowned anthropologist and ethnopharmacologist Christian Ratsch provides the latest scientific updates to this classic work on psychoactive flora by two eminent researchers. • Numerous new and rare color photographs complement the completely revised and updated text. • Explores the uses of hallucinogenic plants in shamanic rituals throughout the world. • Cross-referenced by plant, illness, preparation, season of collection, and chemical constituents. Three scientific titans join forces to completely revise the classic text on the ritual uses of psychoactive plants. They provide a fascinating testimony of these "plants of the gods," tracing their uses throughout the world and their significance in shaping culture and history. In the traditions of every culture, plants have been highly valued for their nourishing, healing, and transformative properties. The most powerful of those plants, which are known to transport the human mind into other dimensions of consciousness, have always been regarded as sacred. The authors detail the uses of hallucinogens in sacred shamanic rites while providing lucid explanations of the biochemistry of these plants and the cultural prayers, songs, and dances associated with them. The text is lavishly illustrated with 400 rare photographs of plants, people, ceremonies, and art related to the ritual use of the world's sacred psychoactive flora.

Plants of the Gods

Their Sacred, Healing, and Hallucinogenic Powers

Author: Richard Evans Schultes

Publisher: Healing Art Press

ISBN:

Category: Ethnobotany

Page: 192

View: 392

Sacred hallucinogens, PLANTS OF THE GODS, are beautifully illustrated and characterized in this lexicon. The authors elaborate in vivid detail 91 plants, focusing on 14 that have had profound significance on human beings. Included are rare photos of the plants and the people who have used them as well as ceremonies, sculpture, paintings, pottery, and weavings relating to the ritual use of these sacred hallucinogens.

Where the Gods Reign

Plants and Peoples of the Colombian Amazon

Author: Richard Evans Schultes

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 306

View: 556

Where the Gods Reign is a magnificent book by one of the greatest ethnobotanical explorers known to this century. It is an essential for those interested in cultural anthropology, ethnobotany, and the Amazon in general.

Messages from the Gods

A Guide to the Useful Plants of Belize

Author: Michael J. Balick

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 504

View: 241

Despite its small size, Belize is one of the most ecologically and culturally diverse nations in Central America. Over 3,400 species of plants can be found here, within a diversity of ecological habitats. Because of this, Belize is paradise for ecotourists, hosting over 900,000 visitors annually, who enjoy the natural habitat and friendly people of this nation. Many of the plants of Belize have a long history of being "useful," with properties that have served traditional herbal healers of the region as well as those who use plants as food, forage, fiber, ornament, in construction and ritual, along with many other purposes. With Messages from the Gods: A Guide to the Useful Plants of Belize, Drs. Michael Balick and Rosita Arvigo give us the definitive resource on the many species of plants in Belize and their folklore, as well as the natural history of the region and a detailed discussion of "bush" uses of plants, including for traditional healing and life in the forest, past and present. Both Balick and Arvigo bring important perspectives to the project, Balick as ethnobotanical scientist from The New York Botanical Garden, and Arvigo as a former apprentice to a Belizean healer and an experienced physician. The book has been decades in the making, a culmination of a biodiversity research project that The New York Botanical Garden and international and local collaborators have had in motion since 1987. Drs. Balick, Arvigo and their colleagues have collected and identified thousands of plants from the region, and have worked extensively with hundreds of Belizean people, many of them herbal healers and bushmasters, to record uses for many of the species. This collaboration with local plant experts has produced a fascinating discussion of the intersection of herbal medicine and spiritual belief in the area, and these interviews are used to compliment and contextualize the numerous species accounts presented. The book is both a cultural study and a specialized field guide; information is provided on many different native and introduced plants in Belize and their traditional and contemporary uses including as food, medicine, fiber, in spiritual practices and many other purposes. Richly illustrated with over 600 images and photographs, Messages from the Gods: A Guide to The Useful Plants of Belize will serve as the primary reference and guide to the ethnobotany of Belize for many years to come.

Heavenly Highs

Ayahuasca, Kava-Kava, DMT, and Other Plants of the Gods

Author: Peter Stafford

Publisher: Ronin Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

View: 320

HEAVENLY HIGHS introduces the reader to a world of enthobotanicals (plants which release the god within) used by Shaman and psychedelic explorers. Includes DMT, which is found in psychedelic snuff; Amazonian ayahuasca, which is a bitter tasting beverage that triggers visionary experiences with plant gods; Ibogain, which is a yellowish root ingested by indigenous peoples to achieve visionary experiences; and Belladona, Yohimbe and Kava-Kava. For each group Stafford provides the history, botany, chemistry, mental and physical effects, preparation and use, and legal considerations.

Gods and Goddesses in the Garden

Greco-Roman Mythology and the Scientific Names of Plants

Author: Peter Bernhardt

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Gardening

Page: 239

View: 463

Zeus, Medusa, Hercules, Aphrodite. Did you know that these and other dynamic deities, heroes, and monsters of Greek and Roman mythology live on in the names of trees and flowers? Some grow in your local woodlands or right in your own backyard garden. In this delightful book, botanist Peter Bernhardt reveals the rich history and mythology that underlie the origins of many scientific plant names. Unlike other books about botanical taxonomy that take the form of heavy and intimidating lexicons, Bernhardt's account comes together in a series of interlocking stories. Each chapter opens with a short version of a classical myth, then links the tale to plant names, showing how each plant "resembles" its mythological counterpart with regard to its history, anatomy, life cycle, and conservation. You will learn, for example, that as our garden acanthus wears nasty spines along its leaf margins, it is named for the nymph who scratched the face of Apollo. The shape-shifting god, Proteus, gives his name to a whole family of shrubs and trees that produce colorful flowering branches in an astonishing number of sizes and shapes. Amateur and professional gardeners, high school teachers and professors of biology, botanists and conservationists alike will appreciate this book's entertaining and informative entry to the otherwise daunting field of botanical names. Engaging, witty, and memorable, Gods and Goddesses in the Garden transcends the genre of natural history and makes taxonomy a topic equally at home in the classroom and at cocktail parties.

The Maximum of Wilderness

The Jungle in the American Imagination

Author: Kelly Enright

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 187

View: 971

Danger in the Congo! The unexplored Amazon! Long perceived as a place of mystery and danger, and more recently as a fragile system requiring our protection, the tropical forest captivated America for over a century. In The Maximum of Wilderness, Kelly Enright traces the representation of tropical forests--what Americans have typically thought of as "jungles"--and their place in both our perception of "wildness" and the globalization of the environmental movement. In the early twentieth century, jungle adventure--as depicted by countless books and films, from Burroughs’s Tarzan novels to King Kong--had enormous mass appeal. Concurrent with the proliferation of a popular image of the jungle that masked many of its truths was the work of American naturalists who sought to represent an "authentic" view of tropical nature through museums, zoological and botanical gardens, books, and film. Enright examines the relationship between popular and scientific representations of the forest through the lives and work of Martin and Osa Johnson (who with films such as Congorilla and Simba blended authenticity with adventure), as well as renowned naturalists John Muir, William Beebe, David Fairchild, and Richard Evans Schultes. The author goes on to explore a startling shift at midcentury in the perception of the tropical forest--from the "jungle," a place that endangers human life, to the "rain forest," a place that is itself endangered.

World of the Gods

Author: Pel Torro

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 320

View: 710

Anzar was known as a crazy eccentric scientist. Nobody paid much attention to his weird pseudo -scientific experiments. When unexplained accidents started to happen around his derelict house it took a young I.P.F lieutenant named Cameron to find out what was going on... Then Cameron vanished. The I.P.F sent another man after Cameron, he went too. That started the full scale attack; an attack that was repulsed before it started. Anzar was ready. Maybe Anzar wasn't crazy? Maybe Anzar was the outstanding scientific genius of the 22nd century? What strange power did his yellow mist possess? What became of the men who got caught in it? As Cameron blacked out he wondered whether there was flesh and blood behind the metal . . . Above all, what mystery lay locked in the great steel cylinder?

An Encyclopedia of Shamanism Volume 2

Author: Christina Pratt

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 368

View: 661

Shamanism can be defined as the practice of initiated shamans who are distinguished by their mastery of a range of altered states of consciousness. Shamanism arises from the actions the shaman takes in non-ordinary reality and the results of those actions in ordinary reality. It is not a religion, yet it demands spiritual discipline and personal sacrifice from the mature shaman who seeks the highest stages of mystical development.

Myths And Symbols

Author: Stephen D. Peet

Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 496

View: 100

Dr. Peet is well known as a writer on American antiquities. He has gathered together from a great variety of sources much interesting and impressive material in regard to the religions of the aboriginal inhabitants of our country. It will be a surprise to the average reader as he peruses these interesting pages to see how elaborate was the religious belief and worship of the untutored races that preceded the era of civilization in America. There is much material in the book upon which to base theories as to the origin of the aboriginal inhabitants of the continent. There is poetic and romantic suggestion in abundance. The student of ethnology or of natural history or of theology and even the merely curious reader will find the book one of great interest. We can but admire the learning of the author, and his diligence in research. Contents: Introduction. Chapter I. Races And Religions In America. Chapter II. Totemism And Mythology. Chapter III. The Serpent Symbol In America. Chapter IV. The Serpent Symbol In America. (Continued. ) Chapter V. Animal Worship And Sun Worship Compared. Chapter VI. American Astrology Or Sky Worship. Chapter VII. The Pyramid In America. Chapter VIII. The Cross In America. Chapter IX. Phallic Worship And Fire Worship In America. Chapter X. The Water Cult And The Deluge Myth. Chapter XI. Transformation Myths. Chapter XII. The Worship Of The Rain God. Chapter XIII. Ethnographic Religions And Ancestor Worship. Chapter XIII — Continued. Anthropomorphic And Mountain Divinities. Chapter XIV. Commemorative Columns And Ancestor Worship. Chapter XV. Personal Divinities And Culture Heroes. Chapter XVI. Culture Heroes And Deified Kings. Chapter XVII. Personal Divinities And Nature Powers In America.