Photosynthesis: Physiology and Metabolism

Author: Richard C. Leegood

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 625

View: 439

Photosynthesis: Physiology and Metabolism is the we have concentrated on the acquisition and ninth volume in theseries Advances in Photosynthesis metabolism of carbon. However, a full understanding (Series Editor, Govindjee). Several volumes in this of reactions involved in the conversion of to series have dealt with molecular and biophysical sugars requires an integrated view of metabolism. aspects of photosynthesis in the bacteria, algae and We have, therefore, commissioned international cyanobacteria, focussing largely on what have been authorities to write chapters on, for example, traditionally, though inaccurately, termed the ‘light interactionsbetween carbon and nitrogen metabolism, reactions’(Volume 1, The Molecular Biology of on respiration in photosynthetic tissues and on the Cyanobacteria;Volume2,AnoxygenicPhotosynthetic control of gene expression by metabolism. Photo- Bacteria, Volume 3, Biophysical Techniques in synthetic carbon assimilation is also one of the most Photosynthesis and Volume 7, The Molecular Biology rapid metabolic processes that occurs in plant cells, of the Chloroplasts and Mitochondria in Chlamy- and therefore has to be considered in relation to domonas). Volume 4 dealt with Oxygenic Photo- transport, whether it be the initial uptake of carbon, synthesis: The Light Reactions, and volume 5 with intracellular transport between organelles, inter- Photosynthesis and the Environment, whereas the cellular transport, as occurs in plants, or transport structure and function of lipids in photosynthesis of photosynthates through and out of the leaf. All was covered in Volume 6 of this series: Lipids in these aspects of transport are also covered in the Photosynthesis: Structure, Function and Genetics, book.

Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology

New Series : Photosynthesis II. Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism and Related Processes. Edited by Martin Gibbs and E.Latzko

Author: A. Pirson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 121

Storage Carbohydrates in Vascular Plants

Distribution, Physiology and Metabolism

Author: Society for Experimental Biology (Great Britain)

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 284

View: 324

Occurrence and distribution of storage carbohydrates in vascular plants; Sucrose metabolism; Pathways and mechanisms associated with carbohydrate translocation in plants; Physiology and metabolism of sucrosyl-fructans; Biosynthesis of oligosaccharides in vascular plants; Physiology and metabolism of cyclitols; Physiology and metabolism of alditols; Biochemistry and physiology of synthesis of starch in leaves: autotrophic and heterotrophic chloroplasts; Degradation of starch in chloroplasts: a buffer to sucrose metabolism; Metabolism of reserve starch; Synthesis and degradation of extracellular storage polysaccharides.

Plant Physiology, Development and Metabolism

Author: Satish C Bhatla

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 1237

View: 821

This book focuses on the fundamentals of plant physiology for undergraduate and graduate students. It consists of 34 chapters divided into five major units. Unit I discusses the unique mechanisms of water and ion transport, while Unit II describes the various metabolic events essential for plant development that result from plants’ ability to capture photons from sunlight, to convert inorganic forms of nutrition to organic forms and to synthesize high energy molecules, such as ATP. Light signal perception and transduction works in perfect coordination with a wide variety of plant growth regulators in regulating various plant developmental processes, and these aspects are explored in Unit III. Unit IV investigates plants’ various structural and biochemical adaptive mechanisms to enable them to survive under a wide variety of abiotic stress conditions (salt, temperature, flooding, drought), pathogen and herbivore attack (biotic interactions). Lastly, Unit V addresses the large number of secondary metabolites produced by plants that are medicinally important for mankind and their applications in biotechnology and agriculture. Each topic is supported by illustrations, tables and information boxes, and a glossary of important terms in plant physiology is provided at the end.

Photosynthesis II

Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism and Related Processes

Author: M. Gibbs

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 578

View: 916

M. GIBBS and E. LATZKO In the preface to his Experiments upon Vegetables, INGEN-Housz wrote in 1779: "The discovery of Dr. PRIESTLEY that plants have a power of correcting bad air . . . shows . . . that the air, spoiled and rendered noxious to animals by their breath ing in it, serves to plants as a kind of nourishment. " INGEN-Housz then described his own experiments in which he established that plants absorb this "nourishment" more actively in brighter sunlight. By the turn of the eighteenth century, the "nourishment" was recognized to be CO . Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation, the 2 major subject of this encyclopedia volume, had been discovered. How plants assimilate the CO was a question several successive generations 2 of investigators were unable to answer; scientific endeavor is not a discipline in which it is easy to "put the cart before the horse". The horse, in this case, was the acquisition of radioactive isotopes of carbon, especially 14c. The cart which followed contained the Calvin cycle, formulated by CALVIN, BENSON and BASSHAM in the early 1950's after (a) their detection of glycerate-3-P as the first stable product of CO fixation, (b) their discovery, and that by HORECKER 2 and RACKER, of the COz-fixing enzyme RuBP carboxylase, and (c) the reports by GIBBS and by ARNON of an enzyme (NADP-linked GAP dehydrogenase) capable of using the reducing power made available from sunlight (via photo synthetic electron transport) to reduce the glycerate-3-P to the level of sugars.

The Biochemistry of Plants

A Comprehensive Treatise

Author: Paul Karl Stumpf

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 357

View: 667

V. 1 The plant cell. v. 2. Metabolism and respiration. v. 3. Carbohydrates. v. 4. Lipids. v. 5. Amino acids and derivates. v. 6. Proteins and nucleic acids. v. 7. Secondary plant products. v. 8. Photosynthesis. v. 9. Lipids: structure a nd function. v. 10. Photosynthesis. v. 11. Biochemistry of metabolism. v. 12. P hysiology of metabolism. v. 13. Methodology. v. 14. Carbohydrates. v. 15. Molecular biology. v.16. Intermediary nitrogen metabolism.

Photosynthesis

Metabolism, Control, and Physiology

Author: David W. Lawlor

Publisher: Longman Sc & Tech

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 262

View: 111

Physiology of Metabolism

Author: David Denzil Davies

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Botanical chemistry

Page: 357

View: 887

V. 1 The plant cell. v. 2. Metabolism and respiration. v. 3. Carbohydrates. v. 4. Lipids. v. 5. Amino acids and derivates. v. 6. Proteins and nucleic acids. v. 7. Secondary plant products. v. 8. Photosynthesis. v. 9. Lipids: structure a nd function. v. 10. Photosynthesis. v. 11. Biochemistry of metabolism. v. 12. P hysiology of metabolism. v. 13. Methodology. v. 14. Carbohydrates. v. 15. Molecular biology. v.16. Intermediary nitrogen metabolism.

Photosynthesis II

Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism and Related Processes

Author: M. Gibbs

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 578

View: 262

M. GIBBS and E. LATZKO In the preface to his Experiments upon Vegetables, INGEN-Housz wrote in 1779: "The discovery of Dr. PRIESTLEY that plants have a power of correcting bad air . . . shows . . . that the air, spoiled and rendered noxious to animals by their breath ing in it, serves to plants as a kind of nourishment. " INGEN-Housz then described his own experiments in which he established that plants absorb this "nourishment" more actively in brighter sunlight. By the turn of the eighteenth century, the "nourishment" was recognized to be CO . Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation, the 2 major subject of this encyclopedia volume, had been discovered. How plants assimilate the CO was a question several successive generations 2 of investigators were unable to answer; scientific endeavor is not a discipline in which it is easy to "put the cart before the horse". The horse, in this case, was the acquisition of radioactive isotopes of carbon, especially 14c. The cart which followed contained the Calvin cycle, formulated by CALVIN, BENSON and BASSHAM in the early 1950's after (a) their detection of glycerate-3-P as the first stable product of CO fixation, (b) their discovery, and that by HORECKER 2 and RACKER, of the COz-fixing enzyme RuBP carboxylase, and (c) the reports by GIBBS and by ARNON of an enzyme (NADP-linked GAP dehydrogenase) capable of using the reducing power made available from sunlight (via photo synthetic electron transport) to reduce the glycerate-3-P to the level of sugars.

Plant Physiology

Author: Lincoln Taiz

Publisher: Sinauer Associates Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 764

View: 989

This fourth edition provides the basics for introductory courses on plant physiology without sacrificing the more challenging material sought by upper division and graduate level students. Many new or revised figures and photographs, study questions and a glossary of key terms have been added.

Photosynthesis II

Photosynthetic Carbon Metabolism and Related Processes

Author: M. Gibbs

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 578

View: 995

M. GIBBS and E. LATZKO In the preface to his Experiments upon Vegetables, INGEN-Housz wrote in 1779: "The discovery of Dr. PRIESTLEY that plants have a power of correcting bad air . . . shows . . . that the air, spoiled and rendered noxious to animals by their breath ing in it, serves to plants as a kind of nourishment. " INGEN-Housz then described his own experiments in which he established that plants absorb this "nourishment" more actively in brighter sunlight. By the turn of the eighteenth century, the "nourishment" was recognized to be CO . Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation, the 2 major subject of this encyclopedia volume, had been discovered. How plants assimilate the CO was a question several successive generations 2 of investigators were unable to answer; scientific endeavor is not a discipline in which it is easy to "put the cart before the horse". The horse, in this case, was the acquisition of radioactive isotopes of carbon, especially 14c. The cart which followed contained the Calvin cycle, formulated by CALVIN, BENSON and BASSHAM in the early 1950's after (a) their detection of glycerate-3-P as the first stable product of CO fixation, (b) their discovery, and that by HORECKER 2 and RACKER, of the COz-fixing enzyme RuBP carboxylase, and (c) the reports by GIBBS and by ARNON of an enzyme (NADP-linked GAP dehydrogenase) capable of using the reducing power made available from sunlight (via photo synthetic electron transport) to reduce the glycerate-3-P to the level of sugars.

Plant Physiology

A Treatise

Author: Frederick Campion Steward

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Plant physiology

Page:

View: 157

Proceedings

Biological sciences

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biology

Page:

View: 393

Handbook of Plant and Crop Stress

Author: Mohammad Pessarakli

Publisher: Marcel Dekker Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Gardening

Page: 697

View: 562

Soil salinity and sodicity problems; Plants, crops, and stressful condiyions. Plant and crop response to salt, water, and other envirommental stress conditions; Molecular bilogy and microbiological aspects of plant responses under salt, water, and other envirommental stress conditions. Empirical investigations of specific plants and crops grown under saline, drought, and other environmental stress conditions; Future promise: plants and crops for cultivation under stressful conditions; Irrigating crops with low-quality water; Benefical aspects of stress.