A Manual of Phonography; Or, Writing by Sound

A Natural Method of Writing by Signs that Represent the Sounds of Language, and Adapted to the English Language as a Complete System of Phonetic Short Hand

Author: Sir Isaac Pitman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Shorthand

Page: 64

View: 358

A Manual of Phonography; Or, Writing by Sound

A Natural Method of Writing by Signs that Represent Spoken Sounds; Adapted to the English Language as a Complete System of Phonetic Shorthand

Author: Isaac Pitman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Shorthand

Page: 72

View: 300

A Manual of Phonography, Or Writing by Sound

A Natural Method of Writing by Signs That Represent Spoken Sounds; Adapted to the English Language as a Complete System of Phonetic Shorthand (Classic Reprint)

Author: Isaac Pitman

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 84

View: 966

Excerpt from A Manual of Phonography, or Writing by Sound: A Natural Method of Writing by Signs That Represent Spoken Sounds; Adapted to the English Language as a Complete System of Phonetic Shorthand Sclavonic, for example, ) were happy enough to escape this second Babel, and rejoice in a convenient alphabet of their own. But each nation that did use the Roman alphabet, used it in its own fashion, and the variety of fashions thus introduced, was, as may be supposed; very great. At length, out of a mixture of Saxon, Danish, French, Latin, and Greek elements, arose our own tongue, harsh and uncouth at first, but gradually winning its way, and now bidding fair, by its own inherent merits, by the richness of its literature, and by the extent of our commerce, to become, if not the universal language itself, its immediate progenitor. The English language, observes the eminent philologist, Prof. J acob Grimm, possesses a power of expression such as was never, perhaps, attained by any human tongue. Its altogether intellectual and singularly-happy foundation and develop ment, has arisen from a surprising alliance between the two noblest languages of antiquity - the German and the Romanesque - the rela tion of which to each other is well known to be such that the former supplies the material foundation, the latter the abstract notions. Yes, truly, the English language may with good reason call itself a uni versal language, and seems chosen, like the English people, to rule in future times, in a still greater degree, in all the corners of the earth. In richness, sound reason, and flexibility, no modern tongue can be compared with it, - not even the German, which must shake off many a weakness before it can enter the lists with the English. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Phonography, Or, Writing by Sound

A Natural Method of Writing All Languages by One Alphabet, Composed of Signs that Represent the Sounds of the Human Voice: Adapted Also to the English Language as a Complete System of Short Hand, Briefer Than Any Other System, and by which a Speaker Can be Followed Verbatim, Without the Use of Arbitrary Marks

Author: Isaac Pitman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Shorthand

Page: 64

View: 479