Birth of the Symbol

Ancient Readers at the Limits of Their Texts

Author: Peter T. Struck

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 331

View: 635

Nearly all of us have studied poetry and been taught to look for the symbolic as well as literal meaning of the text. Is this the way the ancients saw poetry? In Birth of the Symbol, Peter Struck explores the ancient Greek literary critics and theorists who invented the idea of the poetic "symbol." The book notes that Aristotle and his followers did not discuss the use of poetic symbolism. Rather, a different group of Greek thinkers--the allegorists--were the first to develop the notion. Struck extensively revisits the work of the great allegorists, which has been underappreciated. He links their interest in symbolism to the importance of divination and magic in ancient times, and he demonstrates how important symbolism became when they thought about religion and philosophy. "They see the whole of great poetic language as deeply figurative," he writes, "with the potential always, even in the most mundane details, to be freighted with hidden messages." Birth of the Symbol offers a new understanding of the role of poetry in the life of ideas in ancient Greece. Moreover, it demonstrates a connection between the way we understand poetry and the way it was understood by important thinkers in ancient times.

Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie

Author: Ludwig Stein

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 620

View: 409

Vols. 1-23 (1888-1910) include "Jahresberichte über sämtliche Erscheinungen auf dem Gebiete der Geschichte der Philosophie"; v. 24-41 include section "Die neuesten Erscheinungen auf dem Gebiete der Geschichte der Philosophie" (varies slightly)

Die Fragmente Der Griechischen Historiker

Biography and Antiquarian Literature : Iva : Biography : Fascicle 3 : Hermippos of Smyrna

Author: Felix Jacoby

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 455

The present study (edition, translation and commentary) of the fragments expressing interest oin the lives of wise men, philosophers, poets and politicians shed light on the various antecedents of Greek biographical writing in the fifth and forth centuries B.C.

The Book of Greek and Roman Folktales, Legends, and Myths

Author: William Hansen

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 584

View: 208

The first anthology to present the entire range of ancient Greek and Roman stories—from myths and fairy tales to jokes Captured centaurs and satyrs, incompetent seers, people who suddenly change sex, a woman who remembers too much, a man who cannot laugh—these are just some of the colorful characters who feature in the unforgettable stories that ancient Greeks and Romans told in their daily lives. Together they created an incredibly rich body of popular oral stories that include, but range well beyond, mythology—from heroic legends, fairy tales, and fables to ghost stories, urban legends, and jokes. This unique anthology presents the largest collection of these tales ever assembled. Featuring nearly four hundred stories in authoritative and highly readable translations, this is the first book to offer a representative selection of the entire range of traditional classical storytelling. Complete with beautiful illustrations, this one-of-a-kind anthology will delight general readers as well as students of classics, fairy tales, and folklore.

The Classical Origins of Modern Homophobia

Author: Robert H. Allen

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 237

View: 696

From government to literature to architecture, few fields in western culture are untouched by the influence of Ancient Greece and Rome. Even mores that may seem exclusively modern often have roots in the classical past. This book takes an in-depth look at the ancient roots of homophobia, including its Pythagorean origins and its eventual spread throughout the Roman Empire and, consequently, the rest of the world. Originally, male homosexuality occupied something of an honorable position in ancient Greece. By the end of the Roman period several centuries later, this attitude had changed so radically that to be found guilty of homosexual actions was punishable by death. This work investigates how such a shift occurred and traces the various cultural forces that brought about almost universal homophobia throughout western societies. Beginning with the earliest documented instance of homophobia in the teachings of Pythagoras (who was surrounded by mystery even in ancient times), the author examines its proliferation through various disciplines, citing sources from political history, anthropology, religion, and psychology as well as the analysis of ancient texts. Through extensive historical research, he follows the concept from Greece to Macedonia and finally to Rome, examining relevant religious attitudes including those of Christianity and Judaism. Finally, he discusses the ways in which homophobia was solidified in the legal legacy of the Roman Empire. An extensive bibliography provides additional resources regarding classical influence on modern culture.

Philologus Berlin

Author: Friedrich Wilhelm Schneidewin

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Classical philology

Page:

View: 365