Othello

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 728

Othello and Interpretive Traditions

Author: Edward Pechter

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 228

View: 696

During the past twenty years or so, Othello has become the Shakespearean tragedy that speaks most powerfully to our contemporary concerns. Focusing on race and gender (and on class, ethnicity, sexuality, and nationality), the play talks about what audiences want to talk about. Yet at the same time, as refracted through Iago, it forces us to hear what we do not want to hear; like the characters in the play, we become trapped in our own prejudicial malice and guilt.

Othello: A Critical Reader

Author: Robert C. Evans

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 296

View: 764

Othello has long been, and remains, one of Shakespeare's most popular works. It is a favourite work of scholars, students, and general readers alike. Perhaps more than any other of Shakespeare's tragedies, this one seems to speak most clearly to contemporary readers and audiences, partly because it deals with such pressing modern issues as race, gender, multiculturalism, and the ways love, jealousy, and misunderstanding can affect relations between romantic partners. The play also features Iago, one of Shakespeare's most mesmerizing and puzzling villains. This guide offers students and scholars an introduction to the play's critical and performance history, including notable stage productions and film versions. It includes a keynote chapter outlining major areas of current research on the play and four new critical essays. Finally, a guide to critical, web-based and production-related resources and an annotated bibliography provide a basis for further research.

Othello

Author: William Shakespeare

Publisher: W. W. Norton

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 432

View: 585

Othello Teacher Lesson Plans

Author: LessonCaps

Publisher: BookCaps Study Guides

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 40

View: 387

Following Common Core Standards, this lesson plan for William Shakespeare’s, "Othello" is the perfect solution for teachers trying to get ideas for getting students excited about a book. BookCaps lesson plans cover five days worth of material. It includes a suggested reading schedule, discussion questions, essay topics, homework assignments, and suggested web resources.

Shakespeare and YouTube

New Media Forms of the Bard

Author: Stephen O'Neill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 344

View: 320

The video-sharing platform YouTube signals exciting opportunities and challenges for Shakespeare studies. As patron, distributor and archive, YouTube occasions new forms of user-generated Shakespeares, yet a reduced Bard too, subject to the distractions of the contemporary networked mediascape. This book identifies the genres of YouTube Shakespeare, interpreting them through theories of remediation and media convergence and as indices of Shakespeare's shifting cultural meanings. Exploring the intersection of YouTube's participatory culture – its invitation to 'Broadcast Yourself' – with its corporate logic, the book argues that YouTube Shakespeare is a site of productive tension between new forms of self-expression and the homogenizing effects of mass culture. Stephen O'Neill unfolds the range of YouTube's Bardic productions to elaborate on their potential as teaching and learning resources. The book importantly argues for a critical media literacy, one that attends to identity constructions and to the politics of race and gender as they emerge through Shakespeare's new media forms. Shakespeare and YouTube will be of interest to students and scholars of Shakespearean drama, poetry and adaptations, as well as to new media studies.

The End of Satisfaction

Drama and Repentance in the Age of Shakespeare

Author: Heather Hirschfeld

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 240

View: 597

In The End of Satisfaction, Heather Hirschfeld recovers the historical specificity and the conceptual vigor of the term “satisfaction” during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Focusing on the term’s significance as an organizing principle of Christian repentance, she examines the ways in which Shakespeare and his contemporaries dramatized the consequences of its re- or de-valuation in the process of Reformation doctrinal change. The Protestant theology of repentance, Hirschfeld suggests, underwrote a variety of theatrical plots “to set things right” in a world shorn of the prospect of “making enough” (satisfacere). Hirschfeld’s semantic history traces today’s use of “satisfaction”—as an unexamined measure of inward gratification rather than a finely nuanced standard of relational exchange—to the pressures on legal, economic, and marital discourses wrought by the Protestant rejection of the Catholic sacrament of penance (contrition, confession, satisfaction) and represented imaginatively on the stage. In so doing, it offers fresh readings of the penitential economies of canonical plays including Dr. Faustus, The Revenger’s Tragedy, The Merchant of Venice, and Othello; considers the doctrinal and generic importance of lesser-known plays including Enough Is as Good as a Feast and Love’s Pilgrimage; and opens new avenues into the study of literature and repentance in early modern England.

Arab-Muslim Views of the West from the Ninth Century to the Twentieth

The Neglected Bridge Builders

Author: Christopher Nouryeh

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 99

This book introduces readers to many previously neglected Arab-Muslim thinkers who, over the past 1,000 years, have reflected on the relation between Islam and the West. Many of these thinkers have been overlooked by Western scholars because of their orientalist frame of mind, but they were important bridge builders.