Opening Skinner's Box

Great Psychological Experiments of the Twentieth Century

Author: Lauren Slater

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 542

A century can be understood in many ways - in terms of its inventions, its crimes or its art. In Opening Skinner's Box, Lauren Slater sets out to investigate the twentieth century through a series of ten fascinating, witty and sometimes shocking accounts of its key psychological experiments. Starting with the founder of modern scientific experimentation, B.F. Skinner, Slater traces the evolution of the last hundred years' most pressing concerns - free will, authoritarianism, violence, conformity and morality. Previously buried in academic textbooks, these often daring experiments are now seen in their full context and told as stories, rich in plot, wit and character.

Opening Skinner's Box

Great Psychological Experiments of the 20th Century

Author: Lauren Slater

Publisher: Bloomsbury Paperbacks

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

View: 495

This title provides an account of the 20th century's key psychological experiments, by the author of 'Prozac Diary'.

Study Guide

Opening Skinner's Box by Lauren Slater (SuperSummary)

Author: Supersummary

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 72

View: 185

SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. This 71-page guide for "Opening Skinner's Box" by Lauren Slater includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis covering 9 chapters, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis. Featured content includes commentary on major characters, 25 important quotes, essay topics, and key themes like Narrative-Driven Exploration of Science and Psychology's Underlying Philosophical Questions.

Playing House

Notes of a Reluctant Mother

Author: Lauren Slater

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 208

View: 303

Acclaimed author Lauren Slater ruminates on what it means to be family. Lauren Slater’s rocky childhood left her cold to the idea of ever creating a family of her own, but a husband, two dogs, two children, and three houses later, she came around to the challenges, trials, and unexpected rewards of playing house. Boldly honest, these biographical pieces reveal Slater at her wittiest and most deeply personal. She describes her journey from fiercely independent young woman to wife and mother, all while coping with mental illness. She tells of a chemical fire that rekindled the flame in her ailing relationship with her husband; she reflects on her decision to have an abortion, and then later to have children despite suffering from severe depression; she examines sex, love, mastectomies, and how nannies can be intrusive while dogs become family. Beautifully written, often humorous, and always revealing, these stories scrutinize the complex questions surrounding family life, offering up sometimes uncomfortable truths.

Blue Beyond Blue

Extraordinary Tales for Ordinary Dilemmas

Author: Lauren Slater

Publisher: W. W. Norton

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 211

View: 371

A collection of original fairy tales for adults explores contemporary family dynamics, moral conundrums, and romantic love, as well as the role of stories in providing healing and illumination.

Mad Muse

The Mental Illness Memoir in a Writer's Life and Work

Author: Jeffrey Berman

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 275

Many of the well-respected scholarly studies of autobiographical writing have little or nothing to say about mental illness. This book uncovers the mysterious relationship between mood disorders and creativity through the lives of seven writers, demonstrating how mental illness is sometimes the driving force behind creativity.

How Children Learn (New Edition)

Author: Linda Pound

Publisher: Andrews UK Limited

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 128

View: 634

An ideal introduction to the pioneers of educational theory for anyone studying childcare, child development or education – whether at further or higher education level. The first edition of this book has been a best-seller for almost a decade, identified as one of the top ten books for students of child development or early childhood care and education. In this new edition, there is an increased emphasis on both what practice based on particular theories of learning looks like and on criticisms of each theory. A glossary is included in sections highlighting words and concepts particular to the theorist in question. Full-colour photographs are used to illustrate some aspects of each theory or approach. How Children Learn looks at a wide range of theorists and practitioners who have influenced current understandings of how children learn and what this means for work with young children. The book summarises the findings and ideas of famous giants such as Montessori and Piaget as well as the more recent ideas of writers and thinkers such as Howard Gardner and Margaret Donaldson. It begins by looking at the work and life of Comenius who is widely described as the father of modern education and looks at the theory behind different approaches to early childhood care and education such as Steiner Waldorf education, HighScope and Te Whariki. You will find this book invaluable in giving you a clearer picture of how ideas about children’s learning have developed over the past four centuries.

Beyond the Box

B.F. Skinner's Technology of Behaviour from Laboratory to Life, 1950s-1970s

Author: Alexandra Rutherford

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 224

View: 690

B.F. Skinner (1904-1990) is one of the most famous and influential figures in twentieth century psychology. A best-selling author, inventor, and social commentator, Skinner was both a renowned scientist and a public intellectual known for his controversial theories of human behavior. Beyond the Box is the first full-length study of the ways in which Skinner's ideas left the laboratory to become part of the post-war public's everyday lives, and chronicles both the enthusiasm and caution with which this process was received. Using selected case studies, Alexandra Rutherford provides a fascinating account of Skinner and his acolytes' attempts to weave their technology of human behavior into the politically turbulent fabric of 1950s-70s American life. To detail their innovative methods, Rutherford uses extensive archival materials and interviews to study the Skinnerians' creation of human behavior laboratories, management programs for juvenile delinquents, psychiatric wards, and prisons, as well as their influence on the self-help industry with popular books on how to quit smoking, lose weight, and be more assertive. A remarkable look at a post-war scientific and technological revolution, Beyond the Box is a rewarding study of how behavioral theories met real-life problems, and the ways in which Skinner and his followers continue to influence the present.

Burrhus F. Skinner

The Shaping of Behaviour

Author: Frederick Toates

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 150

View: 709

As the world faces up to the challenges of climate change and the threat to security, Skinner's contributions on these issues continue to resonate today. In this stimulating introduction for students and general readers, Toates places Skinner's ideas within the context of mainstream psychological thought, presenting a balanced synthesis of the psychologist's work and his approach. The author reveals the links between Skinner's perspective and other branches of psychology, highlighting his solutions to problems at individual, society and global levels.

The $60,000 Dog

My Life with Animals

Author: Lauren Slater

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN:

Category: Pets

Page: 176

View: 642

A stunning new book about the role of animals in our lives, by a popular and acclaimed writer From the time she is nine years old, biking to the farmland outside her suburban home, where she discovers a disquieting world of sleeping cows and a “Private Way” full of the wondrous and creepy creatures of the wild—spiders, deer, moles, chipmunks, and foxes—Lauren Slater finds in animals a refuge from her troubled life. As she matures, her attraction to animals strengthens and grows more complex and compelling even as her family is falling to pieces around her. Slater spends a summer at horse camp, where she witnesses the alternating horrific and loving behavior of her instructor toward the animals in her charge and comes to question the bond that so often develops between females and their equines. Slater’s questions follow her to a foster family, her own parents no longer able to care for her. A pet raccoon, rescued from a hole in the wall, teaches her how to feel at home away from home. The two Shiba Inu puppies Slater adopts years later, against her husband’s will, grow increasingly important to her as she ages and her family begins to grow. Slater’s husband is a born skeptic and possesses a sternly scientific view of animals as unconscious, primitive creatures, one who insists “that an animal’s worth is roughly equivalent to its edibility.” As one of her dogs, Lila, goes blind and the medical bills and monthly expenses begin to pour in, he calculates the financial burden of their canine family member and finds that Lila has cost them about $60,000, not to mention the approximately 400 pounds of feces she has deposited in their yard. But when Benjamin begins to suffer from chronic pain, Lauren is convinced it is Lila’s resilience and the dog’s quick adaptation to her blindness that draws her husband out of his own misery and motivates him to try to adjust to his situation. Ben never becomes a true believer or a die-hard animal lover, but his story and the stories Lauren tells of her own bond with animals convince her that our connections with the furry, the four-legged, the exoskeleton-ed, or the winged may be just as priceless as our human relationships. The $60,000 Dog is Lauren Slater’s intimate manifesto on the unique, invaluable, and often essential contributions animals make to our lives. As a psychologist, a reporter, an amateur naturalist, and above all an enormously gifted writer, she draws us into the stories of her passion for animals that are so much more than pets. She describes her intense love for the animals in her life without apology and argues, finally, that the works of Darwin and other evolutionary biologists prove that, when it comes to worth, animals are equal, and in some senses even superior, to human beings. From the Hardcover edition.

Great Psychologists as Parents

Does knowing the theory make you an expert?

Author: David Cohen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 150

View: 272

Does it make you a better parent if you have pioneered scientific theories of child development? In a unique study, David Cohen compares what great psychologists have said about raising children and the way they did it themselves. Did the experts practice what they preached? Using an eclectic variety of sources, from letters, diaries, autobiographies, biographies, as well as material from interviews, each chapter focuses on a key figure in historical context. There are many surprises. Was Piaget, the greatest child psychologist of the 20th century, the only man to try to psychoanalyse his mother? How many sons of great gurus have had to rescue their father from a police station as R.D Laing's son did? And why did Melanie Klein's daughter wear red shoes they day her mother died? The book covers early scientists such as Darwin, psychoanalysists such as Freud and Jung, to founders of developmental psychology including Piaget and Bowlby as well as Dr Spock. It gives a vivid, dramatic and often entertaining insight into the family lives of these great psychologists. It highlights their ideas and theories alongside their behaviour as parents, and reveals the impact of their parenting on their children. Close bonds, fraught relationships and family drama are described against a backdrop of scientific development as the discipline of psychology evolves. Great Psychologists as Parents will be absorbing reading for students in childhood studies, education and psychology and practitioners in psychology and psychoanalysis. It will also interest general readers looking for a parenting book with a difference.

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

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View: 970

Strange Science

Author: Editors of Portable Press

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 227

It's scientifically proven: this book is full of seriously strange stuff! This amazing volume from the Bathroom Readers' Institute contains the strangest short science articles from dozens of Bathroom Readers—along with 50 all-new pages. From the oddest theories to the most astounding discoveries to the biggest blunders, Strange Science has all the facts your professors didn't teach you, but should have. It's packed with earth-shattering eurekas, outlandish inventions, silly "scientific" studies, and the stories behind the weirdos who made it all happen. Put on your lab coat and get ready to discover... The freakiest franken-foods scientists have created Bad movie science: when Hollywood gets it wrong One dentist's quest to clone John Lennon Unbelievable inventions, such as the Bird Trap and Cat Feeder...for people who really hate birds How scientists have solved some of history's most stupefying mysteries Schrodinger simplified: What's up with the cat in the box? Real-life time travelers (or so they claim) Everyday products made with radium...until people started dying How to hypnotize a chicken The seven-year-long study that found earthquakes are not caused by catfish waving their tails...and other breakthrough findings And much, much more!

Blue Dreams

The Science and the Story of the Drugs that Changed Our Minds

Author: Lauren Slater

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 416

View: 523

The explosive story of the discovery and development of psychiatric medications, as well as the science and the people behind their invention, told by a riveting writer and psychologist who shares her own experience with the highs and lows of psychiatric drugs. Although one in five Americans now takes at least one psychotropic drug, the fact remains that nearly seventy years after doctors first began prescribing them, not even their creators understand exactly how or why these drugs work -- or don't work -- on what ails our brains. Lauren Slater's revelatory account charts psychiatry's journey from its earliest drugs, Thorazine and lithium, up through Prozac and other major antidepressants of the present. Blue Dreams also chronicles experimental treatments involving Ecstasy, magic mushrooms, the most cutting-edge memory drugs, placebos, and even neural implants. In her thorough analysis of each treatment, Slater asks three fundamental questions: how was the drug born, how does it work (or fail to work), and what does it reveal about the ailments it is meant to treat? Fearlessly weaving her own intimate experiences into comprehensive and wide-ranging research, Slater narrates a personal history of psychiatry itself. In the process, her powerful and groundbreaking exploration casts modern psychiatry's ubiquitous wonder drugs in a new light, revealing their ability to heal us or hurt us, and proving an indispensable resource not only for those with a psychotropic prescription but for anyone who hopes to understand the limits of what we know about the human brain and the possibilities for future treatments.

The Secret History of Kindness: Learning from How Dogs Learn

Author: Melissa Holbrook Pierson

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Pets

Page: 256

View: 819

An intimate, surprising look at man’s best friend and what the leading philosophies of dog training teach us about ourselves. Years back, Melissa Holbrook Pierson brought home a border collie named Mercy, without a clue of how to get her to behave. Stunned after hiring a trainer whose immediate rapport with Mercy seemed magical, Pierson began delving into the techniques of positive reinforcement. She made her way to B. F. Skinner, the behavioral psychologist who started it all, the man who could train a pigeon to dance in minutes and whose research on how behavior is acquired has ramifications for military dolphin trainers, athletes, dancers, and, as he originally conceived, society at large. To learn more, Pierson met with a host of fascinating animal behaviorists, going behind the scenes to witness the relationships between trainers and animals at the National Zoo in Washington, DC, and to the in-depth seminars at a Clicker Expo where all the dogs but hers seemed to be learning new tricks. The often startling story of what became of a pathbreaking scientist’s work is interwoven with a more personal tale of how to understand the foreign species with whom we are privileged to live. Pierson draws surprising connections in her exploration of how kindness works to motivate all animals, including the human one.

Psychiatry

The Science of Lies

Author: Thomas Szasz

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 148

View: 672

For more than half a century, Thomas Szasz has devoted much of his career to a radical critique of psychiatry. His latest work, Psychiatry: The Science of Lies, is a culmination of his life’s work: to portray the integral role of deception in the history and practice of psychiatry. Szasz argues that the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness stands in the same relationship to the diagnosis and treatment of bodily illness that the forgery of a painting does to the original masterpiece. Art historians and the legal system seek to distinguish forgeries from originals. Those concerned with medicine, on the other hand—physicians, patients, politicians, health insurance providers, and legal professionals—take the opposite stance when faced with the challenge of distinguishing everyday problems in living from bodily diseases, systematically authenticating nondiseases as diseases. The boundary between disease and nondisease—genuine and imitation, truth and falsehood—thus becomes arbitrary and uncertain. There is neither glory nor profit in correctly demarcating what counts as medical illness and medical healing from what does not. Individuals and families wishing to protect themselves from medically and politically authenticated charlatanry are left to their own intellectual and moral resources to make critical decisions about human dilemmas miscategorized as "mental diseases" and about medicalized responses misidentified as "psychiatric treatments." Delivering his sophisticated analysis in lucid prose and with a sharp wit, Szasz continues to engage and challenge readers of all backgrounds.

Our Minds, Our Selves

A Brief History of Psychology

Author: Keith Oatley

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 376

View: 649

An original history of psychology told through the stories of its most important breakthroughs—and the men and women who made them In Our Minds, Our Selves, distinguished psychologist and writer Keith Oatley provides an engaging, original, and authoritative history of modern psychology told through the stories of its most important breakthroughs and the men and women who made them. The book traverses a fascinating terrain: conscious and unconscious knowledge, brain physiology, emotion, mental development, language, memory, mental illness, creativity, human cooperation, and much more. Biographical sketches illuminate the thinkers behind key insights: historical figures such as Darwin, Piaget, Skinner, and Turing; leading contemporaries such as Michael Tomasello and Tania Singer; and influential people from other fields, including Margaret Mead, Noam Chomsky, and Jane Goodall. Enhancing our understanding of ourselves and others, psychology holds the potential to create a better world. Our Minds, Our Selves tells the story of this most important of sciences in a new and appealing way.

The Claim

Author: Tim Cowbury

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 104

View: 241

The Claim gently invites you into the most British of interviews, then morphs into a dizzying onslaught of bureaucracy and prejudice. A bold, imaginative response to the stories of those seeking refuge in the UK, this play asks what happens when your life is at stake and all you have to save it are your words.

Controversies and Dilemmas in Contemporary Psychiatry

Author: Dusan Kecmanovic

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 332

View: 355

The controversies and dilemmas in contemporary psychiatry are so numerous and serious that they, to a great extent, define psychiatry. Yet most psychiatrists pay little attention to the field's controversies, maintaining that talking about controversies tarnishes psychiatry's reputation and them along with it. Critics of psychiatry use these controversies and dilemmas, along with psychiatrists' unwillingness to discuss them, to undermine psychiatry. They question the existence of mental disorder and the purpose of psychiatric therapy. Kecmanovic undertakes a major effort of resolving with science, not ideology, such dilemmas. Although psychiatrists give no thought to the mind-body relationship, their attitude towards this relationship determines their approach to the mentally ill, their understanding of the origin and nature of the mental disorder, and the therapy they think has priority. Sometimes psychiatrists implicitly or explicitly cite a specific school of philosophy in order to find conceptual support for their particular practice. As a result psychiatrists do not speak the same language about the same issues. Kecmanovic suggests that there can be no dialogue without common language; opposing views cannot converge without dialogue. The behavior of the mentally ill is socially jarring. This is a major reason why the mentally ill are considered to be a menace. They threaten prevailing manners of communicating, expressing one's thoughts and feelings, and the existing meaning of symbols in a given environment. Deviance of a person with a mental disorder is specific; socially perceived as incomprehensible, irrational, and unpredictable. What is common to all reactions to the disruptive nature of a mental disorder is the desire to be protected from those with illness; in other words, to put them under control and supervision.