Online Communities and Social Computing

Second International Conference, OCSC 2007, Held as Part of HCI International 2007, Beijing, China, July 22-27, 2007, Proceedings

Author: Douglas Schuler

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 526

View: 115

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Second International Conference on Online Communities and Social Computing, OCSC 2007, held in Beijing, China, July 2007 in the framework of the 12th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCII 2007. It covers designing and developing on-line communities, as well as knowledge, collaboration, learning and local on-line communities.

Online Communities and Social Computing

Third International Conference, OCSC 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA, USA, July 19-24, 2009, Proceedings

Author: A. Ant Ozok

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 731

View: 823

The 13th International Conference on Human–Computer Interaction, HCI Inter- tional 2009, was held in San Diego, California, USA, July 19–24, 2009, jointly with the Symposium on Human Interface (Japan) 2009, the 8th International Conference on Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics, the 5th International Conference on Universal Access in Human–Computer Interaction, the Third International Conf- ence on Virtual and Mixed Reality, the Third International Conference on Internati- alization, Design and Global Development, the Third International Conference on Online Communities and Social Computing, the 5th International Conference on Augmented Cognition, the Second International Conference on Digital Human Mod- ing, and the First International Conference on Human Centered Design. A total of 4,348 individuals from academia, research institutes, industry and gove- mental agencies from 73 countries submitted contributions, and 1,397 papers that were judged to be of high scientific quality were included in the program. These papers - dress the latest research and development efforts and highlight the human aspects of the design and use of computing systems. The papers accepted for presentation thoroughly cover the entire field of human–computer interaction, addressing major advances in knowledge and effective use of computers in a variety of application areas.

Tune In, Log On

Soaps, Fandom, and Online Community

Author: Nancy K. Baym

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 249

View: 165

Tune In, Log Out is an ethnographic study of an Internet soap opera fan group. Bridging the fields of computer-mediated communication and audience studies, the book shows how verbal and non verbal communicative practices create collaborative interpretations and criticism, group humor, interpersonal relationships, group norms and individual identity. While much has been written about problems and inequities women have encountered online, Nancy K Baym's analysis of a female-dominated group in which female communication styles prevail demonstrates that women can build successful online communities while still welcoming male participation. In addition, a longitudinal look at the development of fan group allows an examination of the endurance of the group's social structure in the face of the Internet's tremendous growth. Lively and engaging, Tune In, Log Out provides an entertaining introduction to issues of online and audience community.

Virtual Communities

Bowling Alone, Online Together

Author: Felicia Wu Song

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 178

View: 970

Does contemporary Internet technology strengthen civic engagement and democratic practice? The recent surge in online community participation has become a cultural phenomenon enmeshed in ongoing debates about the health of American civil society. But observations about online communities often concentrate on ascertaining the true nature of community and democracy, typically rehearsing familiar communitarian and liberal perspectives. This book seeks to understand the technology on its own terms, focusing on how the technological and organizational configurations of online communities frame our contemporary beliefs and assumptions about community and the individual. It analyzes key structural features of thirty award-winning online community websites to show that while the values of individual autonomy, egalitarianism, and freedom of speech dominate the discursive content of these communities, the practical realities of online life are clearly marked by exclusivity and the demands of commercialization and corporate surveillance. Promises of social empowerment are framed within consumer and therapeutic frameworks that undermine their democratic efficacy. As a result, online communities fail to revolutionize the civic landscape because they create cultures of membership that epitomize the commodification of community and public life altogether.

Online Communities

A Case Study of the Office of the Future

Author: Starr Roxanne Hiltz

Publisher: Intellect Books

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 261

View: 784

This volume discusses "online" communities, where work is mediated and supported by a computer network. How do people react to spending much of their life online? What impacts does it have on the organization for productivity? This volume addresses these key issues by analyzing prototype systems of today that can help answer these important questions for tomorrow. This volume will be of interest to those involved in the applications and social impacts of computer-mediated communications systems and their design and evaluation including managers who must decide whether to implement such systems. It is also relevant for those interested in the relationship between technological innovation and social change.

Building Successful Online Communities

Evidence-Based Social Design

Author: Robert E. Kraut

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 328

View: 834

How insights from the social sciences, including social psychology and economics, can improve the design of online communities. Online communities are among the most popular destinations on the Internet, but not all online communities are equally successful. For every flourishing Facebook, there is a moribund Friendster—not to mention the scores of smaller social networking sites that never attracted enough members to be viable. This book offers lessons from theory and empirical research in the social sciences that can help improve the design of online communities. The authors draw on the literature in psychology, economics, and other social sciences, as well as their own research, translating general findings into useful design claims. They explain, for example, how to encourage information contributions based on the theory of public goods, and how to build members' commitment based on theories of interpersonal bond formation. For each design claim, they offer supporting evidence from theory, experiments, or observational studies.

PC Mag

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 336

View: 738

PCMag.com is a leading authority on technology, delivering Labs-based, independent reviews of the latest products and services. Our expert industry analysis and practical solutions help you make better buying decisions and get more from technology.

Online Communities and Open Innovation

Governance and Symbolic Value Creation

Author: Linus Dahlander

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 122

View: 920

The advent of Internet marked a significant change in how users and customers can be involved in the innovative process. History is rife with examples of how users innovate, but Internet and its associated communication technologies brought radically new means for individuals to interact rapidly and at little cost in communities that spur new innovations. These communities are initiated and governed by people that differ in their motivations for taking part and participate to varying degrees. Such communities are outside the immediate control of companies seeking to develop open innovation strategies aimed at harnessing their work. This book brings together distinguished scholars from different disciplines: economics, organization theory, innovation studies and marketing in order to provide an improved understanding of how technological as well as symbolic value is created and appropriated at the intersection between online communities and firms. Empirical examples are presented from different industries, including software, services and manufacturing. The book offers food for thought for academics and managers to an important phenomenon that challenges many conventional wisdoms for how business can be done. This book was published as a special issue of Industry and Innovation.

Constructing Identities in Online Communities of Practice

A Case Study of Online Learning

Author: Leila Kajee

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 267

View: 787

This work is an exploration of online learning in an undergraduate English language and academic literacy classroom at a university in South Africa, and theorises the need for technology in developing countries as a means of social inclusion.

Educational, Psychological, and Behavioral Considerations in Niche Online Communities

Author: Venkatesh, Vivek

Publisher: IGI Global

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 465

View: 281

Online communities continue to evolve as more people take on a virtual presence. This shift in online communities and the diversity of individuals populating the web has allowed for the emergence of virtual communities centered on niche topics of interests ranging from heavy metal music to indigenous and native culture. Educational, Psychological, and Behavioral Considerations in Niche Online Communities examines the presence of online communities centered around niche topics of interest and the impact of these virtual spaces on community members. Taking perspectives from interdisciplinary fields such as sociology, psychology, and education, this publication will appeal to educators, psychologists, behaviorists, students, and researchers interested in the impact of virtual communities on individuals as well as the opportunities these online communities present.

Frontiers of Human-Centered Computing, Online Communities and Virtual Environments

Author: Rae Earnshaw

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 482

View: 722

This volume presents the results of a joint National Science Foundation and European Commission Workshop which was set up to identify the future key strategic research directions in the areas of human-centred interaction, online communities and virtual environments. A research agenda is proposed for each area. There is an urgent need to make interaction more centred around human needs and capabilities, and to consider the human environment in virtual environments and in other contextual information-processing activities. The overall goal is to make users more effective in their information or communication tasks by reducing learning times, speeding up performance, lowering error rates, facilitating retention, and increasing subjective satisfaction. Online communities is an area of rapid and dynamic growth with new kinds of interaction, behaviours, communication, and relationship to the world of users and information. Guidelines for basic user interface design need to be extended to accommodate these new technologies and interfaces to users. Fruitful lines of research investigation in all these areas are set out in this book.

Web 2.0

User-generated Content in Online Communities ; a Theoretical and Empirical Investigation of Its Determinants

Author: Timo Beck

Publisher: Timo Beck - Diplomica Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 124

View: 534

The number of Internet users is steadily growing. Currently, 55% of all Germans go online on a regular basis compared to 28% in 2001 - and there is no end in sight to this upward trend. Today's young people are growing up with the Internet and the Internet is growing up with them. It is evolving: the term for what is happening now in cyberspace is "Web 2.0," an expression coined at a conference in 2004 by the web-business mogul Tim O'Reilly, to describe a new evolutionary phase of the Internet. The phrase is shorthand for the second Internet boom, which now follows the one that ended in late 2001 with the biggest destruction of investors' capital in history. The bursting of the so-called dotcom bubble 6 years ago marked a turning point. At that time, many people concluded that the Internet was over-hyped. Bubbles and the subsequent shakeouts, however, appear to be a common feature of all technological revolutions. They have always marked the point at which real success stories developed their full scope and showed their strength. The defining feature of the current evolutionary phase of the web is that established companies are giving huge amounts of money to start-ups which have three things in common: they have grown from nowhere with astonishing speed; they often have no revenue stream to speak of; and most of their content is produced by their users. Google paid $1.65bn for the acquisition of Youtube, Rupert Murdochs's News Corp. bought Myspace for $ 580m, and Holzbrinck fully took over Studivz.net for about ? 85m, to give just a few examples of recent "Web 2.0 deals." What makes these so-called online communities so valuable? The answer to this question may be surprising: The deployed technologies are more or less the same as 6 years ago, but what all these new sites share is a new approach to creating things: "user-generated content," in the jargon. The Internet is no longer about corporations telling users what to do, think or buy; it is about the content people create themselves. Participation, not publishing, is the keyword. This development is particularly interesting for corporations which have noticed the importance and potential of the "do-it-yourself Web" as both a strategic marketing tool and a source of valuable information about consumer preferences and opinions. Tomorrow's consumers will no longer be interested in what companies say about their products and services, they will rely on opinions of other "normal" people. Chris Anderson, chief editor of Wired Magazine, states: "Your brand is what Google says about it. Not what you say about it." Corporations which have spent huge amounts of money on questionable market research projects in the past can get even better information for free in the future, as consumers and interested users exchange experiences and opinions about brands and products in online discussion forums anyway. As a result, marketing activities and product offers can be customized by gathering, processing and analyzing information about consumer preferences - it remains to be seen which companies will exploit these new opportunities and which will not. Very little is known about the factors that influence the content production. Often online communities fail because participation drops to zero - and nobody knows why. In order to maximize the participation level and, thereby, the benefits that can be drawn from their contributions, it is important to examine what drives people to produce content. Therefore, this thesis aims to identify the most important factors that influence the level of user-generated content production in online communities. More specifically, a comprehensive conceptual framework of the relevant determinants will be proposed and tested on an empirical basis. The results are supposed to serve as a guideline for researchers and community operators in the future.

Building Online Communities with phpBB

Author: Stoyan Stefanov

Publisher: Packt Publishing Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 343

View: 832

A practical guide to creating and maintaining online discussion forums with phpBB, the leading free open source PHP/MySQL-based bulletin board

Building Online Communities with Drupal, phpBB, and WordPress

Author: Robert T. Douglass

Publisher: Apress

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 560

View: 946

* Content management, blogging, and online forums are among the most significant online trends today, and Drupal, phpBB, and WordPress are three of the most popular open source applications facilitating these tasks. * The authors have played active roles in project development and community support (Mike Little is actually a Wordpress project co-founder). * Drupal, phpBB, and WordPress are based on the PHP language and MySQL database server, ensuring the widest possible audience.

The Library Catalogue as Social Space: Promoting Patron Driven Collections, Online Communities, and Enhanced Reference and Readers' Services

Promoting Patron Driven Collections, Online Communities, and Enhanced Reference and Readers' Services

Author: Laurel Tarulli

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 122

View: 717

Emphasizing the advantages of working together and exploring the future of library services in an online, socially connected world, this exciting book shows how all public library professionals can take advantage of our strongest community and information tool—the library catalogue. • An index of key concepts and terms • A foreword written by Barbara Tillett, chief of the Policy and Standards Division at the Library of Congress

InfoWorld

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 94

View: 287

InfoWorld is targeted to Senior IT professionals. Content is segmented into Channels and Topic Centers. InfoWorld also celebrates people, companies, and projects.

Electronic Community-Oriented Policing

Theories, Contemporary Efforts, and Future Directions

Author: Xiaochen Hu

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 250

View: 800

Hu and Lovrich introduce the "electronic community-oriented policing" (E-COP), concept to explore how social media can impact police strategies on improving police-public relationships. This timely refinement to traditional community-oriented policing strategies is of the utmost importance as we move further into the twentieth century.--Majid Yar, Lancaster University

Online Communities

Commerce, Community Action, and the Virtual University

Author: Chris Werry

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 416

View: 867

Whether you're a marketer, open source developer, political activist, or academic, chances are you depend on robust online communities. Online Communities brings together leading experts on online communities of every kind, commercial and non-commercial, sharing their experience and research on key issues.