One Man, Two Guvnors

Author: Richard Bean

Publisher: Oberon Books

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 96

View: 369

Fired from his skiffle band, Francis Henshall becomes minder to Roscoe Crabbe, a small time East End hood, now in Brighton to collect £6,000 from his fiancee’s dad. But Roscoe is really his sister Rachel posing as her own dead brother, who’s been killed by her boyfriend Stanley Stubbers. Holed up at The Cricketers’ Arms, the permanently ravenous Francis spots the chance of an extra meal ticket and takes a second job with one Stanley Stubbers, who is hiding from the police and waiting to be re-united with Rachel. To prevent discovery, Francis must keep his two guvnors apart. Simple. Based on Carlo Goldoni’s classic Italian comedy The Servant of Two Masters, in this new English version by prizewinning playwright Richard Bean, sex, food and money are high on the agenda. Winner of the both 2011 Evening Standard Theatre Best New Play & Critic's Circle Best New Play awards.

Bean Plays Four

Author: Richard Bean

Publisher: Oberon Books

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 312

View: 301

England People Very Nice ‘A very funny but outrageous comedy...makes you laugh then wonder whether you should have.’ Financial Times The Big Fellah ‘Bean’s play is very funny, full of sharp contrasts between grim hilarity and gut-wrenching reversals.’ The Stage (Shortlisted for the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain Best Theatre Play 2011) The Heretic ‘delicious... Above all, though, it is Bean’s writing that scintillates. Pulsing with shrewd humour, it’s risqué and linguistically rich. There are some blissfully surreal touches... The Heretic is clever, imaginative and entertaining theatre.’ Evening Standard Winner of the 2011 Evening Standard Theatre Best Play Award.

The Nap

Author: Richard Bean

Publisher: Oberon Modern Plays

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 96

View: 163

A laugh out loud comedy thriller about love, honor and not getting snookered.

Toast

Author: Richard Bean

Publisher: Oberon Books

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 88

View: 974

A brilliantly moving and funny play from the writer of the award-winning Under the Whaleback, Harvest and One Man, Two Guvnors. Another Sunday night shift. The smell of bread baking. The industrial thump, thump, thump of the machines that never stop. The ovens are cranked up to full blast, the factory is humming, and everyone wants to be somewhere else. But this shift is going to be different. Because when a crisis hits the factory, the men have more to lose than just their wages...

The Translator on Stage

Author: Geraldine Brodie

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 675

In today's theatre, productions of plays that originated in another language are frequently distinguished by two characteristics: the authorship of the English text by a well-known local theatre specialist, and the absence of the term 'translation'-generally in favour of 'adaptation' or 'version'. The Translator on Stage investigates the creative processes that bring translated plays to the mainstream stage, exploring the commissioning, translation and development procedures that end with a performed play. Through a sample of eight plays that span two thousand years and six languages-including Festen, Don Carlos, Hedda Gabler and The UN Inspector-and that were all staged within a three-month period, Geraldine Brodie brings in a wide range of theatre practitioners to discuss their roles in the translation process and the motivations that govern London theatre translation activities. The Translator on Stage is informed by specially conducted interviews with the productions' producers, artistic directors, directors, literary managers, playwrights and specialist translators, including Michael Grandage, Rufus Norris, David Eldridge, Juan Mayorga, David Johnston and Mike Poulton. It sheds new light not only on theatrical translation procedures, but also on the place of translation in society today.

The National Theatre Story

Author: Daniel Rosenthal

Publisher: Oberon Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 900

View: 871

The National Theatre Story is filled with artistic, financial and political battles, onstage triumphs – and the occasional disaster. This definitive account takes readers from the National Theatre’s 19th-century origins, through false dawns in the early 1900s, and on to its hard-fought inauguration in 1963. At the Old Vic, Laurence Olivier was for ten years the inspirational Director of the NT Company, before Peter Hall took over and, in 1976, led the move into the National’s concrete home on the South Bank. Altogether, the NT has staged more than 800 productions, premiering some of the 20th and 21st centuries’ most popular and controversial plays, including Amadeus, The Romans in Britain, Closer, The History Boys, War Horse and One Man, Two Guvnors. Certain to be essential reading for theatre lovers and students, The National Theatre Story is packed with photographs and draws on Daniel Rosenthal’s unprecedented access to the National Theatre’s own archives, unpublished correspondence and more than 100 new interviews with directors, playwrights and actors, including Olivier’s successors as Director (Peter Hall, Richard Eyre, Trevor Nunn and Nicholas Hytner), and other great figures from the last 50 years of British and American drama, among them Edward Albee, Alan Bennett, Judi Dench, Michael Gambon, David Hare, Tony Kushner, Ian McKellen, Diana Rigg, Maggie Smith, Peter Shaffer, Stephen Sondheim and Tom Stoppard.