On Decoloniality

Concepts, Analytics, Praxis

Author: Walter D. Mignolo

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 284

In On Decoloniality Walter D. Mignolo and Catherine E. Walsh explore the hidden forces of the colonial matrix of power, its origination, transformation, and current presence, while asking the crucial questions of decoloniality's how, what, why, with whom, and what for. Interweaving theory-praxis with local histories and perspectives of struggle, they illustrate the conceptual and analytic dynamism of decolonial ways of living and thinking, as well as the creative force of resistance and re-existence. This book speaks to the urgency of these times, encourages delinkings from the colonial matrix of power and its "universals" of Western modernity and global capitalism, and engages with arguments and struggles for dignity and life against death, destruction, and civilizational despair.

Involving Anthroponomy in the Anthropocene

On Decoloniality

Author: Jeremy Bendik-Keymer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 186

View: 297

This book introduces the idea of anthroponomy – the organization of humankind to support autonomous life – as a response to the problems of today’s purported "Anthropocene" age. It argues for a specific form of accountability for the redressing of planetary-scaled environmental problems. The concept of anthroponomy helps confront geopolitical history shaped by the social processes of capitalism, colonialism, and industrialism, which have resulted in our planetary situation. Involving Anthroponomy in the Anthropocene: On Decoloniality explores how mobilizing our engagement with the politics of our planetary situation can come from moral relations. This book focuses on the anti-imperial work of addressing unfinished decolonization, and hence involves the "decolonial" work of cracking open the common sense of the world that supports ongoing colonization. "Coloniality" is the name for this common sense, and the discourse of the "Anthropocene" supports it. A consistent anti-imperial and anti-capitalist politics, one committed to equality and autonomy, will problematize the Anthropocene through decoloniality. Sometimes the way forward is the way backward. Written in a novel style that demonstrates – not simply theorizes – moral relatedness, this book makes a valuable contribution to the fields of Anthropocene studies, environmental studies, decolonial studies, and social philosophy.

The Politics of Decolonial Investigations

Author: Walter D. Mignolo

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 735

View: 426

In The Politics of Decolonial Investigations Walter D. Mignolo provides a sweeping examination of how coloniality has operated around the world in its myriad forms from the sixteenth century to the twenty-first. Decolonial border thinking allows Mignolo to outline how the combination of the self-fashioned narratives of Western civilization and the hegemony of Eurocentric thought served to eradicate all knowledges in non-European languages and praxes of living and being. Mignolo also traces the geopolitical origins of racialized and gendered classifications, modernity, globalization, and cosmopolitanism, placing them all within the framework of coloniality. Drawing on the work of theorists and decolonial practitioners from the Global South and the Global East, Mignolo shows how coloniality has provoked the emergence of decolonial politics initiated by delinking from all forms of Western knowledge and subjectivities. The urgent task, Mignolo stresses, is the epistemic reconstitution of categories of thought and praxes of living destituted in the very process of building Western civilization and the idea of modernity. The overcoming of the long-lasting hegemony of the West and its distorted legacies is already underway in all areas of human existence. Mignolo underscores the relevance of the politics of decolonial investigations, in and outside the academy, to liberate ourselves from canonized knowledge, ways of knowing, and praxes of living.

The Politics of Decolonial Investigations

Author: Walter D. Mignolo

Publisher: On Decoloniality

ISBN:

Category: Civilization, Modern

Page: 744

View: 345

Walter D. Mignolo provides a sweeping examination of how colonialty has operated around the world in its myriad forms between the sixteenth and twenty-first centuries while calling for a decolonial politics that would delink from all forms of Western knowledge.

Social and Legal Theory in the Age of Decoloniality

(Re-)Envisioning Pan-African Jurisprudence in the 21st Century

Author: Warikandwa, Tapiwa Victor

Publisher: Langaa RPCIG

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 508

View: 344

Right from the enslavement era through to the colonial and contemporary eras, Africans have been denied their human essence – portrayed as indistinct from animals or beasts for imperial burdens, Africans have been historically dispossessed and exploited. Postulating the theory of global jurisprudential apartheid, the book accounts for biases in various legal systems, norms, values and conventions that bind Africans while affording impunity to Western states. Drawing on contemporary notions of animism, transhumanism, posthumanism and science and technology studies, the book critically interrogates the possibility of a jurisprudence of anticipation which is attentive to the emergent New World Order that engineers ‘human beings to become nonhumans’ while ‘nonhumans become humans’. Connecting discourses on decoloniality with jurisprudence in the areas of family law, environment, indigenisation, property, migration, constitutionalism, employment and labour law, commercial law and Ubuntu, the book also juggles with emergent issues around Earth Jurisprudence, ecocentrism, wild law, rights of nature, Earth Court and Earth Tribunal. Arguing for decoloniality that attends to global jurisprudential apartheid., this tome is handy for legal scholars and practitioners, social scientists, civil society organisations, policy makers and researchers interested in transformation, decoloniality and Pan-Africanism.

What Does It Mean to Be Post-Soviet?

Decolonial Art from the Ruins of the Soviet Empire

Author: Madina Tlostanova

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 160

View: 652

In What Does It Mean to Be Post-Soviet? Madina Tlostanova traces how contemporary post-Soviet art mediates this human condition. Observing how the concept of the happy future—which was at the core of the project of Soviet modernity—has lapsed from the post-Soviet imagination, Tlostanova shows how the possible way out of such a sense of futurelessness lies in the engagement with activist art. She interviews artists, art collectives, and writers such as Estonian artist Liina Siib, Uzbek artist Vyacheslav Akhunov, and Azerbaijani writer Afanassy Mamedov who frame the post-Soviet condition through the experience and expression of community, space, temporality, gender, and negotiating the demands of the state and the market. In foregrounding the unfolding aesthesis and activism in the post-Soviet space, Tlostanova emphasizes the important role that decolonial art plays in providing the foundation upon which to build new modes of thought and a decolonial future.

Embracing Failure

Interactive Workshop Series on Decoloniality, Gender + Art

Author: Daniela Wüstenberg

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Geschlechterverhältnisse

Page: 37

View: 763

Postcoloniality - Decoloniality - Black Critique

Joints and Fissures

Author: Sabine Broeck

Publisher: Campus Verlag

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 398

View: 856

How can Western Modernity be analyzed and critiqued through the lens of enslavement and colonial history? The volume maps out answers to this question from the fields of Postcolonial, Decolonial, and Black Studies, delineating converging and diverging positions, approaches, and trajectories. It assembles contributions by renowned scholars of the respective fields, intervening in History, Sociology, Political Sciences, Gender Studies, Cultural and Literary Studies, and Philosophy."

Different Spaces, Different Voices

A Rendezvous with Decoloniality

Author: Sayan Dey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Decolonization

Page: 210

View: 364

This collection of interviews from from various decolonial researchers and academicians across the world centrally reflects upon upon two crucial aspects - the differences between the concepts of postcoloniality and decoloniality, and the multifarious forms of decolonial thinking and doing that are taking place in the contemporary era.

Colonial and Decolonial Linguistics

Knowledges and Epistemes

Author: Ana Deumert

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 400

View: 496

This volume offers a detailed exploration of coloniality in the discipline of linguistics, with case studies drawn from across the world. The chapters provide a nuanced account of the coloniality of linguistics at the level of knowledge and disciplinary practice, and expand their discussion to imagine a decolonial linguistics.

Coloniality, Ontology, and the Question of the Posthuman

Author: Mark Jackson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 250

View: 646

This book brings together emerging insights from across the humanities and social sciences to highlight how postcolonial studies are being transformed by increasingly influential and radical approaches to nature, matter, subjectivity, human agency, and politics. These include decolonial studies, political ontology, political ecology, indigeneity, and posthumanisms. The book examines how postcolonial perspectives demand of posthumanisms and their often ontological discourses that they reflexively situate their own challenges within the many long histories of decolonised practice. Just as postcolonial research needs to critically engage with radical transitions suggested by the ontological turn and its related posthumanist developments, so too do posthumanisms need to decolonise their conceptual and analytic lenses. The chapters' interdisciplinary analyses are developed through global, critical, and empirical cases that include: city spaces and urbanisms in the Global North and South; food politics and colonial land use; cultural and cosmic representation in film, theatre, and poetry; nation building; the Anthropocene; materiality; the void; pluriversality; and, indigenous world views. Theoretically and conceptually rich, the book proposes new trajectories through which postcolonial and posthuman scholarships can learn from one another and so critically advance.

Unsettling Eurocentrism in the Westernized University

Author: Julie Cupples

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 284

View: 489

The westernized university is a site where the production of knowledge is embedded in Eurocentric epistemologies that are posited as objective, disembodied and universal and in which non-Eurocentric knowledges, such as black and indigenous ones, are largely marginalized or dismissed. Consequently, it is an institution that produces racism, sexism and epistemic violence. While this is increasingly being challenged by student activists and some faculty, the westernized university continues to engage in diversity and internationalization initiatives that reproduce structural disadvantages and to work within neoliberal agendas that are incompatible with decolonization. This book draws on decolonial theory to explore the ways in which Eurocentrism in the westernized university is both reproduced and unsettled. It outlines some of the challenges that accompany the decolonization of teaching, learning, research and policy, as well as providing examples of successful decolonial moments and processes. It draws on examples from universities in Europe, New Zealand and the Americas. This book represents a highly timely contribution from both early career and established thinkers in the field. Its themes will be of interest to student activists and to academics and scholars who are seeking to decolonize their research and teaching. It constitutes a decolonizing intervention into the crisis in which the westernized university finds itself.

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Culture and Identity from Early Childhood to Early Adulthood

Perceptions and Implications

Author: Ruth Wills

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 448

View: 944

How do children determine which identity becomes paramount as they grow into adolescence and early adulthood? Which identity results in patterns of behaviour as they develop? To whom or to which group do they feel a sense of belonging? How might children, adolescents and young adults negotiate the gap between their own sense of identity and the values promoted by external influences? The contributors explore the impact of globalization and pluralism on the way most children and adolescents grow into early adulthood. They look at the influences of media and technology that can be felt within the living spaces of their homes, competing with the religious and cultural influences of family and community, and consider the ways many children and adolescents have developed multiple and virtual identities which help them to respond to different circumstances and contexts. They discuss the ways that many children find themselves in a perpetual state of shifting identities without ever being firmly grounded in one, potentially leading to tension and confusion particularly when there is conflict between one identity and another. This can result in increased anxiety and diminished self-esteem. This book explores how parents, educators and social and health workers might have a raised awareness of the issues generated by plural identities and the overpowering human need to belong so that they can address associated issues and nurture a sense of wholeness in children and adolescents as they grow into early adulthood.

Postcolonialism, Decoloniality and Development

Author: Cheryl McEwan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 464

View: 623

Postcolonialism, Decoloniality and Development is a comprehensive revision of Postcolonialism and Development (2009) that explains, reviews and critically evaluates recent debates about postcolonial and decolonial approaches and their implications for development studies. By outlining contemporary theoretical debates and examining their implications for how the developing world is thought about, written about and engaged with in policy terms, this book unpacks the difficult, complex and important aspects of the relationships between postcolonial theory, decoloniality and development studies. The book focuses on the importance of development discourses, the relationship between development knowledge and power, and agency within development. It includes significant new material exploring the significance of postcolonial approaches to understanding development in the context of rapid global change and the dissonances and interconnections between postcolonial theory and decolonial politics. It includes a new chapter on postcolonial theory, development and the Anthropocene that considers the challenges posed by the current global environmental crisis to both postcolonial theory and ideas of development. The book sets out an original and timely agenda for exploring the intersections between postcolonialism, decolonialism and development and provides an outline for a coherent and reinvigorated project of postcolonial development studies. Engaging with new and emerging debates in the fields of postcolonialism and development, and illustrating these through current issues, the book continues to set agendas for diverse scholars working in the fields of development studies, geography, anthropology, politics, cultural studies and history.

Education for Decoloniality and Decolonisation in Africa

Author: Chikumbutso Herbert Manthalu

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Economic development

Page: 282

View: 526

This book focuses on understandings of higher education in relation to notions of decoloniality and decolonization in southern Africa. The volume draws on a range of case studies in multiple politico-cultural contexts on the African continent, and examines some of the challenges to be overcome in order to achieve education for decolonization and decoloniality. Acknowledging that patterns of exclusion, inequality and injustice are still prevalent in the African higher education landscape, the editors and contributors proffer bold attempts at democratizing education and examine how to cultivate just, equal and diverse pedagogical relations. Featuring case studies from South Africa, Zambia, Malawi, and Zimbabwe, the authors and editors examine how higher education can be further democratized and transformed along the lines of equality, liberty and recognition of diversity. This hopeful and bold collection will be of interest to scholars of decoloniality and decolonization in higher education, as well as higher education in southern Africa more specifically.

Decolonization, Development and Knowledge in Africa

Turning Over a New Leaf

Author: Sabelo J. Ndlovu-Gatsheni

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 202

View: 843

This provocative book is anchored on the insurgent and resurgent spirit of decolonization of the twenty-first century. The author calls upon Africa to turn over a new leaf in the domains of politics, economy, and knowledge as it frees itself from imperial global designs and global coloniality. With a focus on Africa and its Diaspora, the author calls for a radical turning over of a new leaf, predicated on decolonial turn and epistemic freedom. The key themes subjected to decolonial analysis include: (1) decolonization/decoloniality – articulating the meaning and contribution of the decolonial turn; (2) subjectivity/identity – examining the problem of Blackness (identity) as external and internal invention; (3) the Bandung spirit of decolonization as an embodiment of resistance and possibilities, development and self-improvement; (4) development and self-improvement – of African political economy, as entangled in the colonial matrix of power, and the African Renaissance, as weakened by undecolonized political and economic thought; and (5) knowledge – the role of African humanities in the struggle for epistemic freedom. This groundbreaking volume opens the intellectual canvas on the challenges and possibilities of African futures. It will be of great interest to students and scholars of Politics and International Relations, Development, Sociology, African Studies, Black Studies, Education, History Postcolonial Studies, and the emerging field of Decolonial Studies.

The Use and Abuse of the Spirit in Pentecostalism

A South African Perspective

Author: Mookgo S. Kgatle

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 208

View: 262

This book is a pneumatological reflection on the use and abuse of the Spirit in light of the abuse of religion within South African Pentecostalism. Both emerging and well-established scholars of South African Pentecostalism are brought together to reflect on pneumatology from various approaches, which includes among others: historical, biblical, migration, commercialisation of religion, discernment of spirits and human flourishing. From a broader understanding of the function of the Holy Spirit in different streams of Pentecostalism, the argument is that this function has changed with the emergence of the new Prophetic churches in South Africa. This is a fascinating insight into one of the major emerging worldwide religious movements. As such, it will be of great interest to academics in Pentecostal Studies, Christian Studies, Theology, and Religious Studies as well as African Studies and the Sociology of Religion.

Memory, Voice, and Identity

Muslim Women’s Writing from across the Middle East

Author: Feroza Jussawalla

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 278

View: 227

Muslim women have been stereotyped by Western academia as oppressed and voiceless. This volume problematizes this Western academic representation. Muslim Women Writers from the Middle East from Out al-Kouloub al-Dimerdashiyyah (1899–1968) and Latifa al-Zayat (1923–1996) from Egypt, to current diasporic writers such as Tamara Chalabi from Iraq, Mohja Kahf from Syria, and even trendy writers such as Alexandra Chreiteh, challenge the received notion of Middle Eastern women as subjugated and secluded. The younger largely Muslim women scholars collected in this book present cutting edge theoretical perspectives on these Muslim women writers. This book includes essays from the conflict-ridden countries such as Iran, Iraq, Palestine, Syria, and the resultant diaspora. The strengths of Muslim women writers are captured by the scholars included herein. The approach is feminist, post-colonial, and disruptive of Western stereotypical academic tropes.

Populism and Postcolonialism

Author: Adrián Scribano

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 200

View: 288

This book investigates the interconnections between populism and neoliberalism through the lens of postcolonialism. Its primary focus is to build a distinct understanding of the concept of populism as a political movement in the twenty-first century, interwoven with the lasting effects of colonialism. This volume particularly aims to fill the gap in the current literature by establishing a clear-cut connection between populism and postcolonialism. It sees populism as a contemporary and collective political response to the international crisis of the nation-state’s limited capacity to deal with the burst of global capitalism into everyday life. Writings on Ecuador, Colombia, Chile, Brazil, Italy, France and Argentina offer regional perspectives which, in turn, provide the reader with a deepened global view of the main features of the multiple and complex relations between postcoloniality and populism. This book will be of interest to sociologists, anthropologists and political scientists as well as postgraduate students who are interested in the problem of populism in the days of postcolonialism.