Ode to a Tenor Titan

The Life and Times and Music of Michael Brecker

Author: Bill Milkowski

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 408

View: 786

After John Coltrane, there was no more revered and profoundly influential saxophonist on the planet than Michael Brecker. For those coming of age in the 1970s, during that transitional decade when the boundaries between rock and jazz had begun to blur, Brecker stood as a transcendent figure. He was their Trane. Ode to a Tenor Titan follows Michael's story from growing up in Philadelphia, finding his tenor sax voice during his brief stint at Indiana University, making his move to New York City in 1969 and taking the Big Apple by storm through the sheer power of his monstrous chops on the instrument. A commanding voice in jazz for four decades, Brecker possessed peerless technique (a byproduct of his remarkable work ethic and relentless woodshedding) and an uncanny ability to fit into every musical situation he encountered, whether it was as a ubiquitous studio musician (more than nine hundred sessions) for such pop stars as Paul Simon, James Taylor, Bruce Springsteen, Todd Rundgren, Chaka Khan, and Steely Dan; playing with seminal fusion bands like Dreams, Billy Cobham, and the Brecker Brothers; or collaborating with the likes of Frank Zappa, Charles Mingus, Pat Metheny, and Herbie Hancock. But his biggest triumphs came as a bandleader during the last twenty years of his career, when he produced some of the most challenging, inspired, and visionary modern jazz recordings of his time. A preternaturally gifted player whose facility seemed almost superhuman, he was also modest to a fault and universally beloved by fellow musicians. After coming through a dark decade of heroin addiction, he turned his life around and became a beacon for countless others to lead clean and sober lives. At the peak of his powers, he was struck down by a rare preleukemic blood disease that sidelined him for two and a half years. He got off a sick bed to make a heroic comeback with his swan song, Pilgrimage, which Pat Metheny called "one of the great codas in modern music history" and which earned him a posthumous Grammy Award in 2007. Michael Brecker was a player of tremendous heart and conviction as well a person of rare humility and kindness, and his story is one for the ages.

Michael Brecker Ode to a Tenor

Author: Bill Milkowski

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 747

After John Coltrane, there was no more revered and profoundly influential saxophonist on the planet than Michael Brecker. For those coming of age in the 1970s, during that transitional decade when the boundaries between rock and jazz had begun to blur, Brecker stood as a transcendent figure. He was their Trane. Ode to a Tenor Titan follows Michael's story from growing up in Philadelphia, finding his tenor sax voice during his brief stint at Indiana University, making his move to New York City in 1969 and taking the Big Apple by storm through the sheer power of his monstrous chops on the instrument. A commanding voice in jazz for four decades, Brecker possessed peerless technique (a byproduct of his remarkable work ethic and relentless woodshedding) and an uncanny ability to fit into every musical situation he encountered, whether it was as a ubiquitous studio musician (more than nine hundred sessions) for such pop stars as Paul Simon, James Taylor, Bruce Springsteen, Todd Rundgren, Chaka Khan, and Steely Dan; playing with seminal fusion bands like Dreams, Billy Cobham, and the Brecker Brothers; or collaborating with the likes of Frank Zappa, Charles Mingus, Pat Metheny, and Herbie Hancock. But his biggest triumphs came as a bandleader during the last twenty years of his career, when he produced some of the most challenging, inspired, and visionary modern jazz recordings of his time. A preternaturally gifted player whose facility seemed almost superhuman, he was also modest to a fault and universally beloved by fellow musicians. After coming through a dark decade of heroin addiction, he turned his life around and became a beacon for countless others to lead clean and sober lives. At the peak of his powers, he was struck down by a rare preleukemic blood disease that sidelined him for two and a half years. He got off a sick bed to make a heroic comeback with his swan song, Pilgrimage, which Pat Metheny called "one of the great codas in modern music history" and which earned him a posthumous Grammy Award in 2007. Michael Brecker was a player of tremendous heart and conviction as well a person of rare humility and kindness, and his story is one for the ages.

Titan

A Monthly Magazine...

Author: James Hogg

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 575

The Invention of Beethoven and Rossini

Historiography, Analysis, Criticism

Author: Nicholas Mathew

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 400

View: 938

Beethoven and Rossini have always been more than a pair of famous composers. Even during their lifetimes, they were well on the way to becoming 'Beethoven and Rossini' – a symbolic duo, who represented a contrast fundamental to Western music. This contrast was to shape the composition, performance, reception and historiography of music throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The Invention of Beethoven and Rossini puts leading scholars of opera and instrumental music into dialogue with each other, with the aim of unpicking the origins, consequences and fallacies of the opposition between the two composers and what they came to represent. In fifteen chapters, contributors explore topics ranging from the concert lives of early nineteenth-century capitals to the mythmaking of early cinema, and from the close analysis of individual works by Beethoven and Rossini to the cultural politics of nineteenth-century music histories.

CD Review

Author:

Publisher:

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Category: Compact disc players

Page:

View: 586

A Star of Song!

The Life of Christina Nilsson

Author: Guy de Charnacé

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 39

View: 910

The Intellectual Adventure of Ancient Man

An Essay of Speculative Thought in the Ancient Near East

Author: Henri Frankfort

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 410

View: 162

The people in ancient times the phenomenal world was teeming with life; the thunderclap, the sudden shadow, the unknown and eerie clearing in the wood, all were living things. This unabridged edition traces the fascinating history of thought from the pre-scientific, personal concept of a "humanized" world to the achievement of detached intellectual reasoning. The authors describe and analyze the spiritual life of three ancient civilizations: the Egyptians, whose thinking was profoundly influenced by the daily rebirth of the sun and the annual rebirth of the Nile; the Mesopotamians, who believed the stars, moon, and stones were all citizens of a cosmic state; and the Hebrews, who transcended prevailing mythopoeic thought with their cosmogony of the will of God. In the concluding chapter the Frankforts show that the Greeks, with their intellectual courage, were the first culture to discover a realm of speculative thought in which myth was overcome.

From Studio to Stage

Repertoire for the Voice

Author: Barbara M. Doscher

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 375

View: 369

The repertoire files of the late Dr. Barbara Doscher, in which she noted her tips, observations on each particular piece, and notes on how to best teach it, comprise a unique trove of wisdom unmatched by any other source. Laboriously transcribed and annotated by John Nix, one of Doscher's students, the notes are presented here as a companion volume to her best-selling text, The Functional Unity of the Singing Voice. Entries are divided by broad category (art song, arias, folk songs, oratorio, musicals, etc.) and are arranged by song title. Each entry includes author, poet or librettist, key(s) available, ranges (for each key), tessitura, difficulty level, voice types, comments, a summary of the text, and notes as to genre, language, and editions available. Five comprehensive indexes facilitate searching. As a guide to selecting vocal repertoire, this book's practical and sometimes colorful comments on each song or aria will assist the vocal instructor in matching the student's ability and range to the appropriate piece. This distillation of Barbara Doscher's many years of experience in the teaching studio is a necessary addition to any vocal instructor's collection, as well as a valuable resource for the individual singer.

Billboard

Author:

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ISBN:

Category:

Page: 112

View: 755

In its 114th year, Billboard remains the world's premier weekly music publication and a diverse digital, events, brand, content and data licensing platform. Billboard publishes the most trusted charts and offers unrivaled reporting about the latest music, video, gaming, media, digital and mobile entertainment issues and trends.

The Virtuoso Conductors

The Central European Tradition from Wagner to Karajan

Author: Raymond Holden

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 370

View: 151

An expert's guide to the skills of the greatest conductors

At the Limits of Romanticism

Essays in Cultural, Feminist, and Materialist Criticism

Author: Mary A. Favret

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 291

View: 895

Examines the feminine, the domestic, the local, collective, sentimental and novelistic in the Romantic literary canon. This book questions romanticism, suppression of the feminine, the material, and the collective, and its opposition to readings centering on these concerns.

Pindar

Author: Pindar

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 248

View: 506

William Empson

Prophet Against Sacrifice

Author: Paul H. Fry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 192

View: 666

William Empson: Prophet Against Sacrifice provides the most coherent account of Empson's diverse career to date. While exploring the richness of Empson's comic genius, Paul H. Fry serves to discredit the appropriation of his name in recent polemic by the conflicting parties of deconstruction and politicized cultural criticism. He argues that Empson is a larger, more important figure than the orthodox in either camp can acknowledge, deserving to be considered alongside such versatile critics as Walter Benjamin, Kenneth Burke and Roland Barthes.