Nothing Like It In the World

The Men Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad 1863-1869

Author: Stephen E. Ambrose

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 431

View: 581

Chronicles the race to finish the transcontinental railroad in the 1860s and the exploits, sacrifices, triumphs, and tragedies of the individuals who made it happen.

Locomotive

with audio recording

Author: Brian Floca

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 64

View: 576

The Caldecott Medal Winner, Sibert Honor Book, and New York Times bestseller Locomotive is a rich and detailed sensory exploration of America’s early railroads, from the creator of the “stunning” (Booklist) Moonshot. It is the summer of 1869, and trains, crews, and family are traveling together, riding America’s brand-new transcontinental railroad. These pages come alive with descriptive details of the journey: the sounds, speed, and strength of the mighty locomotives; the work that keeps them moving; and the thrill of travel from plains to mountain to ocean. Come sit inside the caboose, feel the heat of the engine, watch the landscape race by. Come ride the rails, come cross the young country!

Rivers of the World

A Social, Geographical, and Environmental Sourcebook

Author: James R. Penn

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 357

View: 771

Rivers of the World, vividly written and meticulously researched, is a rich and thorough treatment of some 200 of the world's rivers. * Organized in A-Z format, from the rivers Aare to Ziz * Each entry is prefaced with basic facts for the river covered, including river source, tributaries, outlet, and length * Each entry concludes with suggestions for further reading * Includes a full index and glossary of key terms

Eating History

Thirty Turning Points in the Making of American Cuisine

Author: Andrew F. Smith

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 392

View: 572

Food expert and celebrated food historian Andrew F. Smith recounts in delicious detail the creation of contemporary American cuisine. The diet of the modern American wasn't always as corporate, conglomerated, and corn-rich as it is today, and the style of American cooking, along with the ingredients that compose it, has never been fixed. With a cast of characters including bold inventors, savvy restaurateurs, ruthless advertisers, mad scientists, adventurous entrepreneurs, celebrity chefs, and relentless health nuts, Smith pins down the truly crackerjack history behind the way America eats. Smith's story opens with early America, an agriculturally independent nation where most citizens grew and consumed their own food. Over the next two hundred years, however, Americans would cultivate an entirely different approach to crops and consumption. Advances in food processing, transportation, regulation, nutrition, and science introduced highly complex and mechanized methods of production. The proliferation of cookbooks, cooking shows, and professionally designed kitchens made meals more commercially, politically, and culturally potent. To better understand these trends, Smith delves deeply and humorously into their creation. Ultimately he shows how, by revisiting this history, we can reclaim the independent, locally sustainable roots of American food.

When America First Met China: An Exotic History of Tea, Drugs, and Money in the Age of Sail

Author: Eric Jay Dolin

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 442

Ancient China collides with newfangled America in this epic tale of opium smugglers, sea pirates, and dueling clipper ships. Brilliantly illuminating one of the least-understood areas of American history, best-selling author Eric Jay Dolin now traces our fraught relationship with China back to its roots: the unforgiving nineteenth-century seas that separated a brash, rising naval power from a battered ancient empire. It is a prescient fable for our time, one that surprisingly continues to shed light on our modern relationship with China. Indeed, the furious trade in furs, opium, and beche-de-mer—a rare sea cucumber delicacy—might have catalyzed America’s emerging economy, but it also sparked an ecological and human rights catastrophe of such epic proportions that the reverberations can still be felt today. Peopled with fascinating characters—from the “Financier of the Revolution” Robert Morris to the Chinese emperor Qianlong, who considered foreigners inferior beings—this page-turning saga of pirates and politicians, coolies and concubines becomes a must-read for any fan of Nathaniel Philbrick’s Mayflower or Mark Kurlansky’s Cod.

Faith-Based War

From 9/11 to Catastrophic Success in Iraq

Author: T. Walter Herbert

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 124

The American invasion of Iraq was largely governed by faith-based policy. The "shock and Awe" strategy, alongside a grossly mismanaged occupation, led to the loss of American lives. Faith-Based War presents an analysis of the imperialist Christian militarism behind the Bush Administration. America’s self-perception as God’s Chosen is examined and its catastrophic results detailed. The book offers an ethical, political and theological perspective on the perversion of Christian teaching behind the war in Iraq and the moral culpability of the American empire.

The Empire Strikes Out

How Baseball Sold U.S. Foreign Policy and Promoted the American Way Abroad

Author: Robert Elias

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 1000

Is the face of American baseball throughout the world that of goodwill ambassador or ugly American? Has baseball crafted its own image or instead been at the mercy of broader forces shaping our society and the globe? The Empire Strikes Out gives us the sweeping story of how baseball and America are intertwined in the export of “the American way.” From the Civil War to George W. Bush and the Iraq War, we see baseball’s role in developing the American empire, first at home and then beyond our shores. And from Albert Spalding and baseball’s first World Tour to Bud Selig and the World Baseball Classic, we witness the globalization of America’s national pastime and baseball’s role in spreading the American dream. Besides describing baseball’s frequent and often surprising connections to America’s presence around the world, Elias assesses the effects of this relationship both on our foreign policies and on the sport itself and asks whether baseball can play a positive role or rather only reinforce America’s dominance around the globe. Like Franklin Foer in How Soccer Explains the World, Elias is driven by compelling stories, unusual events, and unique individuals. His seamless integration of original research and compelling analysis makes this a baseball book that’s about more than just sports.

Empire of the Summer Moon

Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History

Author: S.C. Gwynne

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 291

In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all. Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second is the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches. Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a nine-year-old girl who was kidnapped by Comanches in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the "White Squaw" who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend. S. C. Gwynne's account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told.

Impeached

The Trial of President Andrew Johnson and the Fight for Lincoln's Legacy

Author: David O. Stewart

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 690

“Likely to become the standard version of this historic clash between a president and Congress.” —Kirkus Reviews (starred review) After two presidential impeachment crises in the last forty years, and with the dramatic expansion of the powers of the presidency, the lessons of the first presidential impeachment are more urgent than ever. In 1868 Congress impeached President Andrew Johnson of Tennessee, the man who had succeeded the murdered Lincoln, bringing the nation to the brink of a second civil war. Enraged to see the freed slaves abandoned to brutal violence at the hands of their former owners, distraught that former rebels threatened to regain control of Southern state governments, and disgusted by Johnson's brawling political style, congressional Republicans seized on a legal technicality as the basis for impeachment -- whether Johnson had the legal right to fire his own secretary of war, Edwin Stanton. The fiery but mortally ill Congressman Thaddeus Stevens of Pennsylvania led the impeachment drive, abetted behind the scenes by the military hero and president-in-waiting, General Ulysses S. Grant. The Senate trial featured the most brilliant lawyers of the day, along with some of the least scrupulous, while leading political fixers maneuvered in dark corners to save Johnson's presidency with political deals, promises of patronage jobs, and even cash bribes. Johnson escaped conviction by a single vote. David Stewart, the author of the highly acclaimed The Summer of 1787, the bestselling account of the writing of the Constitution, challenges the traditional version of this pivotal moment in American history. Rather than seeing Johnson as Abraham Lincoln's political heir, Stewart explains how the Tennessean squandered Lincoln's political legacy of equality and fairness and helped force the freed slaves into a brutal form of agricultural peonage across the South. When the clash between Congress and president threatened to tear the nation apart, the impeachment process substituted legal combat for violent confrontation. Both sides struggled to inject meaning into the baffling requirement that a president be removed only for "high crimes and misdemeanors," while employing devious courtroom gambits, backstairs spies, and soaring rhetoric. When the dust finally settled, the impeachment process had allowed passions to cool sufficiently for the nation to survive the bitter crisis.

Post-Punk Perception

Living in the Social Milieu

Author: Edmund Wong

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 450

View: 757

Growing up in Singapore in the 80s has been challenging. I didn't know much about life or economy. I didn't know what I want to do apart from playing. I know I had to study and get a job. In school we had to write composition about our profession when we grow up. I had never wanted to be a philosopher, let alone writing about social philosophy. It is just that growing up with a single parent is tough. It is tougher when she is uneducated and I had to learn most things by myself. After my National Service, I decided to further studies. That was when I was exposed to philosophy and psychology in the UK. After graduation in 1999 with a degree in Electronics, I came back home to resume my National Service (I disrupt it and had about 2 months left). The life in UK exposed me to something that I did not notice when growing up in Singapore. I find local social scene unsatisfactory. They are Confucians, Muslims, Christians, freethinkers and humanists. Most time, they are preoccupied with how to earn more money. Religion does not give me the fulfillment that it promised. In addition, most were based on Singaporeans' interpretation of the Bible and Buddhism's dharma. Most times, I feel that everything that Singaporeans do has got to do with wealth creation or at least with the expenditure of it. It end up like what Pope Francis referred to as "the cult of money." Organised religion involves more fear-mongering than cultivating an inner grace and peace. Hence this book is about how I relate an ancient thinker's ethics (Aristotle) to the present day. I find Aristotle's ethics to most suit my needs as a man and lover. It does not pretend to be more than what it seek, the golden mean. It does require us to think and explore the values to find balance and achieve wisdom with intellectual and moral virtues. I also find other philosophers (French or not) particularly insightful and thought-provoking. They offer me explanation and exploration on subjects like love, sex, and death. Freudian psychoanalysis are also very penetrating in their findings and insights. Moreover, I needed some contemporary psychological theory, not in-depth psychoanalysis, to back Aristotle's model of ethics (intellectual and moral virtues). Hence the psychological background of my book. I got acquainted with these psychological theories when I was preparing myself to be a financial consultant. I later found out more about them and they became useful in my work and life. Hence I would like to share it with people in Asia so that they can ask the right kind of questions in life in order to learn more about themselves and the social milieu they are living in. Because everyone of us are affected by the social sciences (politics, economics and sociology). This book will, I hope, allow us to understand why we are irrational and how we can make rational changes through reasonings in their life and achieving eudaimonia. My wish is simply to share what I enjoy doing, apart from creating useful ideas to improve the world. Through my book, I hope to make others understand religion, science and philosophy and how they play an increasingly integral part in the Asian century.