Not Now, Voyager

A Memoir

Author: Lynne Schwartz

Publisher: Counterpoint

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 176

View: 540

Ever since the explorations of Marco Polo and the travels of Montaigne, a lively dialogue has persisted about the pros and cons of travel. Lynne Sharon Schwartz joins this dialogue with a memoir that raises both serious and amusing questions about travel, using her own experiences as vivid illustrations. Not Now, Voyager takes us on a voyage of self-discovery as the author traces how travel has shaped her sensibilities from childhood through adulthood. She makes an adolescent visit to Miami Beach, where she confronts the powerful sensation of not belonging; she goes to Rome as a young woman and ponders the difference between ignorance and innocence; she ventures to Jamaica and witnesses political and social unrest; and she takes a family road trip to Montreal and watches her daughters come to startling realizations of their own. Schwartz’s personal history takes on new shapes, and her feelings about travel change as she shows us who she started out as and who she has become. Above all, this memoir exemplifies a mode of travel in and of itself: the mind on a journey or quest, pausing here and there, sometimes by design, sometimes by serendipity, lingering, occasionally backtracking, but always on the move.

Now, Voyager

Author: Olive Higgins Prouty

Publisher: The Feminist Press at CUNY

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 491

“Don’t let’s ask for the moon! We have the stars!” The film that concludes with Bette Davis’s famous words, reaffirmed Davis’s own stardom and changed the way Americans smoked cigarettes. But few contemporary fans of this story of a woman’s self-realization know its source. Olive Higgins Prouty’s 1941 novel Now, Voyager provides an even richer, deeper portrait of the inner life of its protagonist and the society she inhabits. Viewed from a distance of more than 60 years, it also offers fresh and quietly radical takes on psychiatric treatment, traditional family life, female desire, and women’s agency. Boston blueblood Charlotte Vale has led an unhappy, sheltered life. Dowdy, repressed, and pushing forty, Charlotte finds salvation in the unlikely form of a nervous breakdown, placing her at a sanitarium, where she undergoes treatment to rebuild her ravaged self-esteem and uncover her true intelligence and charm. Femmes Fatales restores to print the best of women’s writing in the classic pulp genres of the mid-20th century. From mystery to hard-boiled noir to taboo lesbian romance, these rediscovered queens of pulp offer subversive perspectives on a turbulent era. Enjoy the series: Bedelia; Bunny Lake Is Missing; By Cecile; The G-String Murders; The Girls in 3-B; Laura; The Man Who Loved His Wife; Mother Finds a Body; Now, Voyager; Return to Lesbos; Skyscraper; Stranger on Lesbos; Stella Dallas; Women's Barracks.

Britton on Film

The Complete Film Criticism of Andrew Britton

Author: Andrew Britton

Publisher: Wayne State University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 533

View: 654

Collects all published film criticism by Andrew Britton, a singular voice in film studies whose promising career was cut short by his untimely death.

The Lioness in Winter

Writing an Old Woman's Life

Author: Ann Burack-Weiss

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 973

When she started working with the aged more than forty years ago, Ann Burack-Weiss began storing the knowledge and skills she thought would help when she got old herself. It was not until she hit her mid-seventies that she realized she had packed sneakers to climb Mount Everest, not anticipating the crevices and chasms that constitute the rocky terrain of old age. The professional gerontological and social work literature offered little help, so she turned to the late-life works of beloved women authors who had bravely climbed the mountain and sent back news from the summit. Maya Angelou, Colette, Simone de Beauvoir, Joan Didion, Marguerite Duras, M. F. K. Fisher, Doris Lessing, Mary Oliver, Adrienne Rich, May Sarton, and Florida Scott-Maxwell were among the many guides she turned to for inspiration. In The Lioness in Winter, Burack-Weiss blends an analysis of key writings from these and other famed women authors with her own wisdom to create an essential companion for older women and those who care for them. She fearlessly examines issues such as living with loss, finding comfort and joy in unexpected places, and facing disability and death. This book is filled with powerful passages from women who turned their experiences of aging into art, and Burack-Weiss ties their words to her own struggles and epiphanies, framing their collective observations with key insights from social work practice.

The Story Until Now

A Great Big Book of Stories

Author: Kit Reed

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 468

View: 564

Called “one of our brightest cultural commentators” by Publishers Weekly, Kit Reed draws from life—with a difference. This new collection brings together thirty-four of her strong, original stories, from early classics like “The Wait” and “Winter” to six never-before-collected short stories, including “The Legend of Troop 13” and “Wherein We Enter the Museum.” An early favorite, “Automatic Tiger,” is the first in a series of Reed’s stories about animals. There’s a monkey who grinds out bestsellers with the help of a “creative writing” app. Her uncanny black dog can enter a crowded room and sit down at the feet of the next man to die. Her characters confront war in various arenas: mother/daughter battles, the war of the sexes, the struggles of men scarred by war. Kit Reed’s self-described “transgenred” fiction is confirmation of an “extraordinary talent” (The Financial Times). The range and complexity of her work speaks for itself in The Story Until Now.

New York Magazine

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 156

View: 121

New York magazine was born in 1968 after a run as an insert of the New York Herald Tribune and quickly made a place for itself as the trusted resource for readers across the country. With award-winning writing and photography covering everything from politics and food to theater and fashion, the magazine's consistent mission has been to reflect back to its audience the energy and excitement of the city itself, while celebrating New York as both a place and an idea.

Children of the shadows

voices of the second generation

Author: Kathy Grinblat

Publisher: Univ of Western Australia Pr

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 210

View: 271

Collection of 27 stories from children of Holocaust survivors. Contributors come from varied walks of life and speak with candour. As children of survivors they are the bridge between despair and the renewal of life and hope for their parents. Explores the impact of their parents experiences on them. Includes glossary and notes on contributors. Simultaneously published in hardcover and paperback. Editor is the daughter of Czechoslovakian Holocaust survivors and is a graduate of the University of Sydney.

Considering Doris Day

A Biography

Author: Tom Santopietro

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 895

The biggest female box office attraction in Hollywood history, Doris Day remains unequalled as the only entertainer who has ever triumphed in movies, radio, recordings, and a multi-year weekly television series. America's favorite girl next door may have projected a wholesome image that led Oscar Levant to quip "I knew Doris Day before she was a virgin," but in Considering Doris Day Tom Santopietro reveals Day's underappreciated and effortless acting and singing range that ran the gamut from musicals to comedy to drama and made Day nothing short of a worldwide icon. Covering the early Warner Brothers years through Day's triumphs working with artists as varied as Alfred Hitchcock and Bob Fosse, Santopietro's smart and funny book deconstructs the myth of Day as America's perennial virgin, and reveals why her work continues to resonate today, both onscreen as pioneering independent career woman role model, and off, as a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States' highest civilian honor. Praised by James Cagney as "my idea of a great actor" and by James Garner as "the Fred Astaire of comedy," Doris Day became not just America's favorite girl, but the number one film star in the world. Yet after two weekly television series, including a triumphant five year run on CBS, she turned her back on show business forever. Examining why Day's worldwide success in movies overshadowed the brilliant series of concept recordings she made for Columbia Records in the '50s and '60s, Tom Santopietro uncovers the unexpected facets of Day's surprisingly sexy acting and singing style that led no less an observer than John Updike to state "She just glowed for me." Placing Day's work within the social context of America in the second half of the twentieth century, Considering Doris Day is the first book that grants Doris Day her rightful place as a singular American artist.

All About All About Eve

The Complete Behind-the-Scenes Story of the Bitchiest Film Ever Made!

Author: Sam Staggs

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 320

View: 857

To millions of fans, All About Eve represents all that's witty and wonderful in classic Hollywood movies. Its old-fashioned, larger-than-life stars--including Bette Davis, Marilyn Monroe, Anne Baxter, George Sanders, and Celeste Holm--found their best roles in Eve and its sophisticated dialogue has entered the lexicon. But there's much more to know about All About Eve. Sam Staggs has written the definitive account of the making of this fascinating movie and its enormous influence on both film and popular culture. Staggs reveals everything about the movie--from who the famous European actress Margo Channing was based on to the hot-blooded romance on-set between Bette Davis and costar Gary Merrill, from the jump-start the movie gave Marilyn Monroe's career and the capstone it put on director Joseph L. Mankeiwicz's. All About "All About Eve" is not only full of rich detail about the movie, the director, and the stars, but also about the audience who loved it when it came out and adore it to this day.

Victoria Baths

Manchester's Water Palace

Author: Prue Williams

Publisher: Spire Books Limited

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 118

View: 681

Victoria Baths hit the headlines in 2003 by winning the BBC's Restoration competition. This magnificent complex was described on opening as "the most splendid municipal bathing institution in the country". It houses a wealth of beautiful tiling, stained glass, mosaic flooring and other decorative detail. After a decade of disuse, the work of bringing it back to life is beginning. While campaigning to save the Baths, the Friends of Victoria Baths researched its history. Ths book is the result, telling of how the Baths were conceived, their construction in 1903-6, and variety of uses of 87 years. The richest information source has been the memories of people who swam, bathed, danced and worked here over the years. They shared their memories and stories with Prue Williams, and the resulting book adds much to the social and architectural history of a great industrial city.