Norman Rockwell

The Underside of Innocence

Author: Richard Halpern

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 201

View: 589

"Rockwell emerges in this book, then, as a deviously brilliant artist, a remorseless diagnostician of the innocence in which we bathe ourselves, and a continuing, unexpected influence on contemporary artists. Far from a banal painter of the ordinary, Halpern argues, Rockwell is someone we have not yet dared to see for the complex creature he is: a wholesome pervert, a knowing innocent, and a kitschy genius."--BOOK JACKET.

Norman Rockwell

Author: Laura Claridge

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 576

View: 341

Norman Rockwell’s tremendously successful, prolific career as a painter and illustrator has rendered him a twentieth-century American icon. However, the very popularity and accessibility of his idealized, nostalgic depictions of middleclass life have caused him to be considered not a serious artist but a “mere illustrator”–a disparagement only reinforced by the hundreds of memorable covers he drew for The Sunday Evening Post. Symptomatic of critics’ neglect is the fact that Rockwell has never before been the subject of a serious critical biography. Based on private family archives and interviews and publishes to coincide with a major two-year travelling retrospective of his work, this book reveals for the first time the driven workaholic who had three complicated marriages and was a distant father —so different from the loving, all-American-dad image widely held to this day. Critically acclaimed author Laura Claridge also breaks new ground with her reappraisal of Rockwell’s art, arguing that despite his popular sentimental style, his artistry was masterful, complex, and far more manipulative than people realize.

Norman Rockwell

Author: Karal Ann Marling

Publisher: Harry N Abrams Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 159

View: 320

In seven chapters, Marling examines the many forces that shaped Rockwell's artistic vision, among them his conception of the calling of the illustrator, his empathy with children, his role in the Colonial Revival of the 1920s and 1930s, his discovery of the narrative power of everyday details, his anxiety over his identity as an artist, and his ambition to create works that would change the world. She uncovers many fresh details about Rockwell, showing, for example, how his friendships with Erik Erikson and Robert Coles in the 1960s influenced his response to the Civil Rights Movement, eliciting paintings such as The Problem We All Live With and New Kids in the Neighborhood that helped to sway public opinion.

Creative Haven Norman Rockwell Classics from The Saturday Evening Post Coloring Book

Author: Norman Rockwell

Publisher: Courier Dover Publications

ISBN:

Category: Antiques & Collectibles

Page: 64

View: 247

Thirty-one illustrations by Norman Rockwell appear in all their heartwarming glory in this classic and collectible coloring book, handpicked from hundreds of covers that the artist created for The Saturday Evening Post.

Norman Rockwell

pictures for the American people

Author: Norman Rockwell

Publisher: Harry N. Abrams

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 199

View: 736

A companion volume to the first major traveling exhibition of Norman Rockwell's work includes analysis by major art historians, culture critics, and psychologists, as well as 120 illustrations from the master illustrator of Americana. BOMC Main. QPB Alt.

Norman Rockwell

Author: Adam G. Klein

Publisher: ABDO

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 654

This book discusses Norman Rockwell's earliest influences and the people and events that inspired his work.

Norman Rockwell

behind the camera

Author: Ron Schick

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 224

View: 372

Offers insight into the work and methods of the celebrated American illustrator, describing with lavish reproductions of numerous works his efforts at the sides of skilled photographers who combined models, props, and locations that served as the basis of Rockwell's iconic images.

American Mirror: The Life and Art of Norman Rockwell

Author: Deborah Solomon

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 512

View: 486

A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEAR A FINALIST FOR THE LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE IN BIOGRAPHY AND SHORTLISTED FOR THE PEN/JACQUELINE BOGRAD WELD AWARD FOR BIOGRAPHY "Welcome to Rockwell Land," writes Deborah Solomon in the introduction to this spirited and authoritative biography of the painter who provided twentieth-century America with a defining image of itself. As the star illustrator of The Saturday Evening Post for nearly half a century, Norman Rockwell mingled fact and fiction in paintings that reflected the we-the-people, communitarian ideals of American democracy. Freckled Boy Scouts and their mutts, sprightly grandmothers, a young man standing up to speak at a town hall meeting, a little black girl named Ruby Bridges walking into an all-white school—here was an America whose citizens seemed to believe in equality and gladness for all. Who was this man who served as our unofficial "artist in chief" and bolstered our country's national identity? Behind the folksy, pipe-smoking façade lay a surprisingly complex figure—a lonely painter who suffered from depression and was consumed by a sense of inadequacy. He wound up in treatment with the celebrated psychoanalyst Erik Erikson. In fact, Rockwell moved to Stockbridge, Massachusetts so that he and his wife could be near Austen Riggs, a leading psychiatric hospital. "What's interesting is how Rockwell's personal desire for inclusion and normalcy spoke to the national desire for inclusion and normalcy," writes Solomon. "His work mirrors his own temperament—his sense of humor, his fear of depths—and struck Americans as a truer version of themselves than the sallow, solemn, hard-bitten Puritans they knew from eighteenth-century portraits." Deborah Solomon, a biographer and art critic, draws on a wealth of unpublished letters and documents to explore the relationship between Rockwell's despairing personality and his genius for reflecting America's brightest hopes. "The thrill of his work," she writes, "is that he was able to use a commercial form [that of magazine illustration] to thrash out his private obsessions." In American Mirror, Solomon trains her perceptive eye not only on Rockwell and his art but on the development of visual journalism as it evolved from illustration in the 1920s to photography in the 1930s to television in the 1950s. She offers vivid cameos of the many famous Americans whom Rockwell counted as friends, including President Dwight Eisenhower, the folk artist Grandma Moses, the rock musician Al Kooper, and the generation of now-forgotten painters who ushered in the Golden Age of illustration, especially J. C. Leyendecker, the reclusive legend who created the Arrow Collar Man. Although derided by critics in his lifetime as a mere illustrator whose work could not compete with that of the Abstract Expressionists and other modern art movements, Rockwell has since attracted a passionate following in the art world. His faith in the power of storytelling puts his work in sync with the current art scene. American Mirror brilliantly explains why he deserves to be remembered as an American master of the first rank.

Who Was Norman Rockwell?

Author: Sarah Fabiny

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 372

Brush up your knowledge on popular American painter and illustrator Norman Rockwell with this exciting Who Was? title. Norman Rockwell often painted what he saw around him in nostalgic and humorous ways. After hearing President Franklin Roosevelt's address to Congress in 1943, he was inspired to create paintings that described the principles for universal rights: four paintings that portray iconic images of the American experience. Over the course of his lifetime, he painted 322 covers for the Saturday Evening Post. Of his work, he has said: "Maybe as I grew up and found the world wasn't the perfect place I thought it to be, I consciously decided that if it wasn't an ideal world, it should be, and so painted only the ideal aspects of it."