Neither Victims nor Executioners

An Ethic Superior to Murder

Author: Albert Camus

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 74

View: 961

Endorsements: "The reissue of Camus' seminal essay, 'Neither Victims nor Executioners, ' could hardly be more timely. In Iraq and Afghanistan, the hideous march to oblivion goes on apace. America is ironically reversing the ethic proposed by Camus' title. American adventuring, playing the part of omnipotent executioner, is creating multitudes of victims. No search is undertaken for a 'third way.' Indeed, were the Camus thesis proposed, it would evoke only wide-eyed innocent arrogance. Kennedy and Klotz-Chamberlin have dedicated a lifetime to the 'third way' commended by Camus. Our gratitude to our mentors for a prescient, timely introduction." --Fr. Daniel Berrigan, SJ "Pacifists are not looking for a Utopian outlook nor unrealistic expectations. Many said, 'South Africa will not change.' But it did. Others looked at Northern Ireland and, it took years, but it also changed. The Soviet Union changed. The Middle East will change but not through violence or murder. We still think of ourselves within borders, protecting ourselves from others, Europe took its borders away and they are better. South, Central, and North America should take away their borders, as well as people in the Middle East. . . . We should build a culture of nonviolence through an understanding of human rights without regard to race, religion, and nationality." --Mubarak Awad, founder of Nonviolence International "If we spontaneously approve of nuclear terrorism, if we become apologists for the uninhibited use of naked power, we are thinking like Communists, we are behaving like Nazis, and we are well on the way to becoming either one or the other. In that event we had better face the fact that we are destroying our own Christian heritage." --Thomas Merton Author Biography: Albert Camus (November 7, 1913 - January 4, 1960) was a French author and philosopher and one of the principal luminaries (with Jean-Paul Sartre) of existentialism. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957.

Camus at Combat

Writing 1944-1947

Author: Albert Camus

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 736

For the first time in English, "Camus at Combat" presents all of Camus' World War II resistance and early postwar writings published in "Combat," the resistance newspaper where he served as editor-in-chief and editorial writer between 1944 and 1947.

Freedom Time

Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World

Author: Gary Wilder

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 400

View: 569

Freedom Time reconsiders decolonization from the perspectives of Aimé Césaire (Martinique) and Léopold Sédar Senghor (Senegal) who, beginning in 1945, promoted self-determination without state sovereignty. As politicians, public intellectuals, and poets they struggled to transform imperial France into a democratic federation, with former colonies as autonomous members of a transcontinental polity. In so doing, they revitalized past but unrealized political projects and anticipated impossible futures by acting as if they had already arrived. Refusing to reduce colonial emancipation to national independence, they regarded decolonization as an opportunity to remake the world, reconcile peoples, and realize humanity’s potential. Emphasizing the link between politics and aesthetics, Gary Wilder reads Césaire and Senghor as pragmatic utopians, situated humanists, and concrete cosmopolitans whose postwar insights can illuminate current debates about self-management, postnational politics, and planetary solidarity. Freedom Time invites scholars to decolonize intellectual history and globalize critical theory, to analyze the temporal dimensions of political life, and to question the territorialist assumptions of contemporary historiography.

Camus and Sartre

The Story of a Friendship and the Quarrel that Ended It

Author: Ronald Aronson

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 291

View: 710

Until now it has been impossible to read the full story of the relationship between Albert Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre. Their dramatic rupture at the height of the Cold War, like that conflict itself, demanded those caught in its wake to take sides rather than to appreciate its tragic complexity. Now, using newly available sources, Ronald Aronson offers the first book-length account of the twentieth century's most famous friendship and its end. Albert Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre first met in 1943, during the German occupation of France. The two became fast friends. Intellectual as well as political allies, they grew famous overnight after Paris was liberated. As playwrights, novelists, philosophers, journalists, and editors, the two seemed to be everywhere and in command of every medium in post-war France. East-West tensions would put a strain on their friendship, however, as they evolved in opposing directions and began to disagree over philosophy, the responsibilities of intellectuals, and what sorts of political changes were necessary or possible. As Camus, then Sartre adopted the mantle of public spokesperson for his side, a historic showdown seemed inevitable. Sartre embraced violence as a path to change and Camus sharply opposed it, leading to a bitter and very public falling out in 1952. They never spoke again, although they continued to disagree, in code, until Camus's death in 1960. In a remarkably nuanced and balanced account, Aronson chronicles this riveting story while demonstrating how Camus and Sartre developed first in connection with and then against each other, each keeping the other in his sights long after their break. Combining biography and intellectual history, philosophical and political passion, Camus and Sartre will fascinate anyone interested in these great writers or the world-historical issues that tore them apart.

The Development of Albert Camus's Concern for Social and Political Justice

"justice Pour Un Juste"

Author: Mark Orme

Publisher: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 350

View: 216

Chronological in character, the book seeks to evaluate the evolution of Camus's lifelong preoccupation with sociopolitical justice, as expressed in a range of nonfictional genres (essays, journalism, articles, speeches, notebooks, and personal correspondence), where the writer's own concerns come directly to the fore.".

Albert Camus

From the Absurd to Revolt

Author: John Foley

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 288

View: 589

Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, encompassing philosophy, literature, politics and history, John Foley examines the full breadth of Camus' ideas to provide a comprehensive and rigorous study of his political and philosophical thought and a significant contribution to a range of debates current in Camus research. Foley argues that the coherence of Camus' thought can best be understood through a thorough understanding of the concepts of 'the absurd' and 'revolt' as well as the relation between them. This book includes a detailed discussion of Camus' writings for the newspaper "Combat", a systematic analysis of Camus' discussion of the moral legitimacy of political violence and terrorism, a reassessment of the prevailing postcolonial critique of Camus' humanism, and a sustained analysis of Camus' most important and frequently neglected work, "L'Homme revolte" (The Rebel).

Issues in War and Peace

Philosophical Inquiries

Author: Kenneth H. Klein

Publisher: Longwood PressLtd

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 334

View: 141

Born Jewish

A Childhood in Occupied Europe

Author: Marcel Liebman

Publisher: Verso

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 181

View: 645

The author describes his childhood in Nazi-occupied Belgium during World War II.

The Enigma of Good and Evil: The Moral Sentiment in Literature

Author: Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 880

View: 381

Striking toward peace and harmony the human being is ceasely torn apart in personal, social, national life by wars, feuds, inequities and intimate personal conflicts for which there seems to be no respite. Does the human condition in interaction with others imply a constant adversity? Or, is this conflict owing to an interior or external factor of evil governing our attitudes and conduct toward the other person? To what criteria should I refer for appreciation, judgment, direction concerning my attitudes and my actions as they bear on the well-being of others? At the roots of these questions lies human experience which ought to be appropriately clarified before entering into speculative abstractions of the ethical theories and precepts. Literature, which in its very gist, dwells upon disentangling in multiple perspective the peripeteia of our life-experience offers us a unique field of source-material for moral and ethical investigations. Literature brings preeminently to light the Moral Sentiment which pervades our life with others -- our existence tout court. Being modulated through the course of our experiences the Moral Sentiment sustains the very sense of literature and of personal human life (Tymieniecka).