Native Colonialism

Education and the Economy of Violence Against Traditions in Ethiopia

Author: Yirga Gelaw Woldeyes

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 248

View: 825

Native Colonialism examines the cause and consequence of native colonialism, the process whereby a country colonises itself with foreign institutions and ideals. The book draws its evidence from a variety of Ethiopian sources that have rarely been studied or utilised in academic research. It provides never-before seen interpretations of indigenous sources of knowledge and features ground breaking empirical research on traditional and modern schools in the county, as well as interviews with students, teachers and traditional leaders.

Native Diasporas

Indigenous Identities and Settler Colonialism in the Americas

Author: Gregory D. Smithers

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 592

View: 329

The arrival of European settlers in the Americas disrupted indigenous lifeways, and the effects of colonialism shattered Native communities. Forced migration and human trafficking created a diaspora of cultures, languages, and people. Gregory D. Smithers and Brooke N. Newman have gathered the work of leading scholars, including Bill Anthes, Duane Champagne, Daniel Cobb, Donald Fixico, and Joy Porter, among others, in examining an expansive range of Native peoples and the extent of their influences through reaggregation. These diverse and wide-ranging essays uncover indigenous understandings of self-identification, community, and culture through the speeches, cultural products, intimate relations, and political and legal practices of Native peoples. ¾Native Diasporas explores how indigenous peoples forged a sense of identity and community amid the changes wrought by European colonialism in the Caribbean, the Pacific Islands, and the mainland Americas from the seventeenth through the twentieth century. Broad in scope and groundbreaking in the topics it explores, this volume presents fresh insights from scholars devoted to understanding Native American identity in meaningful and methodologically innovative ways. ¾

The Archaeology of Native-lived Colonialism

Challenging History in the Great Lakes

Author: Neal Ferris

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 226

View: 700

Colonialism may have significantly changed the history of North America, but its impact on Native Americans has been greatly misunderstood. In this book, Neal Ferris offers alternative explanations of colonial encounters that emphasize continuity as well as change affecting Native behaviors. He examines how communities from three aboriginal nations in what is now southwestern Ontario negotiated the changes that accompanied the arrival of Europeans and maintained a cultural continuity with their pasts that has been too often overlooked in conventional Òmaster narrativeÓ histories of contact. In reconsidering Native adaptation and resistance to colonial British rule, Ferris reviews five centuries of interaction that are usually read as a single event viewed through the lens of historical bias. He first examines patterns of traditional lifeway continuity among the Ojibwa, demonstrating their ability to maintain seasonal mobility up to the mid-nineteenth century and their adaptive response to its loss. He then looks at the experience of refugee Delawares, who settled among the Ojibwa as a missionary-sponsored community yet managed to maintain an identity distinct from missionary influences. And he shows how the archaeological history of the Six Nations Iroquois reflected patterns of negotiating emergent colonialism when they returned to the region in the 1780s, exploring how families managed tradition and the contemporary colonial world to develop innovative ways of revising and maintaining identity. The Archaeology of Native-Lived Colonialism convincingly utilizes historical archaeology to link the Native experience of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to the deeper history of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century interactions and with pre-European times. It shows how these Native communities succeeded in retaining cohesiveness through centuries of foreign influence and material innovations by maintaining ancient, adaptive social processes that both incorporated European ideas and reinforced historically understood notions of self and community.

Aboriginal Peoples, Colonialism and International Law

Raw Law

Author: Irene Watson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 188

View: 615

This work is the first to assess the legality and impact of colonisation from the viewpoint of Aboriginal law, rather than from that of the dominant Western legal tradition. It begins by outlining the Aboriginal legal system as it is embedded in Aboriginal people’s complex relationship with their ancestral lands. This is Raw Law: a natural system of obligations and benefits, flowing from an Aboriginal ontology. This book places Raw Law at the centre of an analysis of colonisation – thereby decentring the usual analytical tendency to privilege the dominant structures and concepts of Western law. From the perspective of Aboriginal law, colonisation was a violation of the code of political and social conduct embodied in Raw Law. Its effects were damaging. It forced Aboriginal peoples to violate their own principles of natural responsibility to self, community, country and future existence. But this book is not simply a work of mourning. Most profoundly, it is a celebration of the resilience of Aboriginal ways, and a call for these to be recognised as central in discussions of colonial and postcolonial legality. Written by an experienced legal practitioner, scholar and political activist, AboriginalPeoples, Colonialism and International Law: Raw Law will be of interest to students and researchers of Indigenous Peoples Rights, International Law and Critical Legal Theory.

Native Society and Disease in Colonial Ecuador

Author: Suzanne Austin Alchon

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 168

View: 340

A regional history of the Amerindians' biological experience under colonial rule.

Colonial Survey and Native Landscapes in Rural South Africa, 1850 - 1913

The Politics of Divided Space in the Cape and Transvaal

Author: Lindsay Frederick Braun

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: BUSINESS & ECONOMICS

Page: 426

View: 348

In "Colonial Survey and Native Landscapes in Rural South Africa, 1850 - 1913," Lindsay Frederick Braun explores the technical processes and struggles surrounding the creation and maintenance of boundaries and spaces in South Africa in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Making India: Colonialism, National Culture, and the Afterlife of Indian English Authority

Author: Makarand R. Paranjape

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 266

View: 704

Compared to how it looked 150 years ago at the eve of the colonial conquest, today’s India is almost completely unrecognizable. A sovereign nation, with a teeming, industrious population, it is an economic powerhouse and the world’s largest democracy. It can boast of robust legal institutions and a dizzying plurality of cultures, in addition to a lively and unrestricted print and electronic media. The question is how did it get to where it is now? Covering the period from 1800 to 1950, this study of about a dozen makers of modern India is a valuable addition to India’s cultural and intellectual history. More specifically, it shows how through the very act of writing, often in English, these thought leaders reconfigured Indian society. The very act of writing itself became endowed with almost a charismatic authority, which continued to influence generations that came after the exit of the authors from the national stage. By examining the lives and works of key players in the making of contemporary India, this study assesses their relationships with British colonialism and Indian traditions. Moreover, it analyzes how their use of the English language helped shape Indian modernity, thus giving rise to a uniquely Indian version of liberalism. The period was the fiery crucible from which an almost impossibly diverse and pluralistic new nation emerged through debate, dialogue, conflict, confrontation, and reconciliation. The author shows how the struggle for India was not only with British colonialism and imperialism, but also with itself and its past. He traces the religious and social reforms that laid the groundwork for the modern sub-continental state, proposed and advocated in English by the native voices that influenced the formation India’s society. Merging culture, politics, language, and literature, this is a path breaking volume that adds much to our understanding of a nation that looks set to achieve much in the coming century.

The Postcolonial Studies Dictionary

Author: Pramod K. Nayar

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 433

This new Dictionary features a thoughtfully collated collection of over 150 jargon-free definitions of key terms and concepts in postcolonial theory. Features a brief introduction to postcolonial theory and a list of suggested further reading that includes the texts in which many of these terms originated Each entry includes the origins of the term, where traceable; a detailed explanation of its perceived meaning; and examples of the term’s use in literary-cultural texts Incorporates terms and concepts from multiple disciplines, including anthropology, literary studies, science, economics, globalization studies, politics, and philosophy Provides an ideal companion text to the forthcoming Postcolonial Studies: An Anthology, which is also edited by Pramod K. Nayar, a highly-respected authority in the field

Native Resistance and the Pax Colonial in New Spain

Author: Susan Schroeder

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 484

Ethnic rebellions continually disrupted the Pax Colonial, Spain's three-hundred-year rule over the Native peoples of Mexico. Although these uprisings varied considerably in cause, duration, consequences, and scale, they collectively served as a constant source of worry for the Spanish authorities. This meticulously researched volume provides both a valuable overview of Native uprisings in New Spain and a stimulating reevaluation of their significance. Running counter to the prevailing scholarly tendency to emphasize similarities among ethnic revolts, the seven contributors examine episodes of rebellion that are distinguished by their ethnic, geographical, and historical diversity, ranging culturally and geographically across colonial New Spain and spanning the last two centuries of Spanish rule. Unparalleled access to colonial archival sources also enables the writers to more fully consider indigenous perspectives on resistance and explore in greater detail than before the precipitating factors and effects of different forms of protest. A provocative concluding essay balances this line of inquiry by investigating how a shared cultural disposition toward violence in colonial New Spain contributed to the atmosphere of ethnic tension and rebellion. Susan Schroeder is a professor of history at Loyola University. She is the author of Chimalpahin and the Kingdom of Chalco and the coeditor of the forthcoming Indian Women in Early Mexico.

The Turn to the Native

Studies in Criticism and Culture

Author: Arnold Krupat

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 149

View: 601

The Turn to the Native is a timely account of Native American literature and the critical writings that have grown up around it. Arnold Krupat considers racial and cultural “essentialism,” the ambiguous position of non-Native critics in the field, cultural “sovereignty” and “property,” and the place of Native American culture in a so-called multicultural era. Chapters follow on the relationship of Native American culture to postcolonial writing and postmodernism. Krupat comments on the recent work of numerous Native writers. The final chapter, “A Nice Jewish Boy among the Indians,” presents the author’s effort to balance his Jewish and working-class heritage, his adherence to Western “critical” ideals, and his ongoing loyalty to the values of Native cultures.

Studying Native America

Problems and Prospects

Author: Social Science Research Council (U. S.) American Indian Studies advisor

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 443

View: 308

"The White Man does not understand the Indian for the reason that he does not understand America. He is too far removed from its formative process. The roots of the tree of his life have not yet grasped rock and soil." The words of Lakota writer Luther Standing Bear foretold the current debate on the value of Native American studies in higher education. Studying Native America addresses for the first time in a comprehensive way the place of this critical discipline in the university curriculum. Leading scholars in anthropology, demography, English and literature, history, law, social work, linguistics, public health, psychology, and sociology have come together to explore what Native American studies has been, what it is, and what it may be in the future. The book's thirteen contributors and editor Russell Thornton, stress the frequent incompatibility of traditional academic teaching methods with the social and cultural concerns that gave rise to the field of Native American studies. Beginning with the intellectual and institutional history of Native American studies, the book examines its literature, language, historical narratives, and anthropology. The volume discusses the effects on Native American studies of law and constitutionalism; cosmology, epistemology, and religion; identity; demography; colonialism and post-colonialism; science and technology; and repatriation of human remains and cultural objects. Contributors to Studying Native America include Raymond J. DeMallie, Bonnie Duran, Eduardo Duran, Raymond D. Fogelson, Clara Sue Kidwell, Kerwin Lee Klein, Melissa L. Meyer, John H. Moore, Peter Nabokov, Katheryn Shanley, C. Matthew Snipp, Rennard Strickland, Russell Thornton, J. Randolph Valentine, Robert Allen Warrior, Richard White, and Maria Yellowhorse-Braveheart. The book is sponsored in part by the Social Science Research Council.

Indigenous Peoples and Colonialism

Global Perspectives

Author: Colin Samson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 154

Indigenous peoples have gained increasing international visibility in their fight against longstanding colonial occupation by nation-states. Although living in different locations around the world and practising highly varied ways of life, indigenous peoples nonetheless are affected by similar patterns of colonial dispossession and violence. In defending their collective rights to self-determination, culture, lands and resources, their resistance and creativity offer a pause for critical reflection on the importance of maintaining indigenous distinctiveness against the homogenizing forces of states and corporations. This timely book highlights significant colonial patterns of domination and their effects, as well as responses and resistance to colonialism. It brings indigenous peoples' issues and voices to the forefront of sociological discussions of modernity. In particular, the book examines issues of identity, dispossession, environment, rights and revitalization in relation to historical and ongoing colonialism, showing that the experiences of indigenous peoples in wealthy and poor countries are often parallel and related. With a strong comparative scope and interdisciplinary perspective, the book is an essential introductory reading for students interested in race and ethnicity, human rights, development and indigenous peoples' issues in an interconnected world.

Fish, Law, and Colonialism

The Legal Capture of Salmon in British Columbia

Author: Douglas Colebrook Harris

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 306

View: 989

An engrossing history, Fish, Law, and Colonialism recounts the human conflict over fish and fishing in British Columbia and of how that conflict was shaped by law. Pacific salmon fisheries, owned and managed by Aboriginal peoples, were transformed in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by commercial and sport fisheries backed by the Canadian state and its law. Through detailed case studies of the conflicts over fish weirs on the Cowichan and Babine rivers, Douglas Harris describes the evolving legal apparatus that dispossessed Aboriginal peoples of their fisheries. Building upon themes developed in literatures on state law and local custom, and law and colonialism, he examines the contested nature of the colonial encounter on the scale of a river. In doing so, Harris reveals the many divisions both within and between government departments, local settler societies, and Aboriginal communities. Drawing on government records, statute books, case reports, newspapers, missionary papers and a secondary anthropological literature to explore the roots of the continuing conflict over the salmon fishery, Harris has produced a superb, and timely, legal and historical study of law as contested terrain in the legal capture of Aboriginal salmon fisheries in British Columbia.

Colonialism and the Modern World

Selected Studies

Author: Gregory Blue

Publisher: M.E. Sharpe

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 359

View: 779

Paper by Bruce Kercher traces the legal origins of the doctrine of terra nullius in early court cases in New South Wales.

The Archaeology of Colonialism

Intimate Encounters and Sexual Effects

Author: Barbara L. Voss

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 969

This volume examines human sexuality as an intrinsic element in the interpretation of complex colonial societies. While archaeological studies of the historic past have explored the dynamics of European colonialism, such work has largely ignored broader issues of sexuality, embodiment, commemoration, reproduction and sensuality. Recently, however, scholars have begun to recognize these issues as essential components of colonization and imperialism. This book explores a variety of case studies, revealing the multifaceted intersections of colonialism and sexuality. Incorporating work that ranges from Phoenician diasporic communities of the eighth century to Britain's nineteenth-century Australian penal colonies to the contemporary Maroon community of Brazil, this volume changes the way we understand the relationship between sexuality and colonial history.

Colonial America from Settlement to the Revolution

Author: Rodney P. Carlisle

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 869

This work is a thought-provoking look at the original 13 colonies, presenting the facts and engaging the reader by using alternate history—what if key events had turned out differently?—to help develop critical thinking skills.

From a Native Son

Selected Essays in Indigenism, 1985-1995

Author: Ward Churchill

Publisher: South End Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 588

View: 587

Ward Churchill has emerged over the past decade as one of the strongest and most influential voices of native resistance in North America. From a Native Son collects his most important and unflinching essays, which explore the themes of

Asian Settler Colonialism

From Local Governance to the Habits of Everyday Life in Hawai?i

Author: Candace Fujikane

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 318

View: 527

This title takes a look at indigenous views of Asian settlement in Hawaii over the past century. It is a valuable resource not only for Asian Americans in Hawaii but for all scholars and activists grappling with issues of social justice in other 'settler' societies.