American Icons

Author: Dennis Hall

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Americana

Page: 937

View: 322

American Icons

Transatlantic Perspectives on Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century American Art

Author: Thomas Gaehtgens

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 372

View: 170

American painters and graphic artists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries sought inspiration for their work in the uniquely American experience of history and nature. The result was a transformation of the conventional Old World visual language into an indigenous and populist New World syntax. The twelve essays in this volume explore the development of a frontier mythology, a democratic style depicting common people and objects, and an American artistic consciousness and identity. Conceived and written from the perspectives of both cultural and art historians, American Icons initiates an interdisciplinary discussion on the complex relationships between American and European art.

Understanding American Icons

An Introduction to Semiotics

Author: Arthur Asa Berger

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 184

View: 828

This brief, student-friendly introduction to the study of semiotics uses examples from 25 iconic locations in the United States. From Coney Island to Las Vegas, the World Trade Center to the Grand Canyon, Berger shows how semiotics offers a different lens in understanding locations taken for granted in American culture. He recasts Disneyland according to Freud, channels the Mall of America through Baudrilliard, and sees Mount Rushmore through the lens of Gramsci. A seasoned author of student texts, Berger offers an entertaining, non-threatening way to teach theory to undergraduates and that will fit ideally in classes on cultural studies, American studies, social theory, and tourism.

American Icons

Yellowstone National Park

Author: Stonesong Press

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 522

The American Icons series celebrates the people, places, and objects that have informed American popular culture over the last 75 years. Illustrated throughout and replete with anecdotes, fun facts, and informative sidebars. American Icons: Yellowstone National Park is a celebration of America's first national park. From its famous geothermal geysers to its abundant wildlife, Yellowstone National Park is arguably the most beautiful land in North America, and this book captures that splendor by exploring the park's history and place in American pop culture.

Icons of Power

Feline Symbolism in the Americas

Author: Nicholas J. Saunders

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 641

Icons of Power investigates why the image of the cat has been such a potent symbol in the art, religion and mythology of indigenous American cultures for three thousand years. The jaguar and the puma epitomize ideas of sacrifice, cannibalism, war, and status in a startling array of graphic and enduring images. Natural and supernatural felines inhabit a shape-shifting world of sorcery and spiritual power, revealing the shamanic nature of Amerindian world views. This pioneering collection offers a unique pan-American assessment of the feline icon through the diversity of cultural interpretations, but also striking parallels in its associations with hunters, warriors, kingship, fertility, and the sacred nature of political power. Evidence is drawn from the pre-Columbian Aztec and Maya of Mexico, Peruvian, and Panamanian civilizations, through recent pueblo and Iroquois cultures of North America, to current Amazonian and Andean societies. This well-illustrated volume is essential reading for all who are interested in the symbolic construction of animal icons, their variable meanings, and their place in a natural world conceived through the lens of culture. The cross-disciplinary approach embraces archaeology, anthropology, and art history.

Icons of American Popular Culture

From P.T. Barnum to Jennifer Lopez

Author: Robert C. Cottrell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 280

View: 454

Traces the evolution of American popular culture over the past two centuries. In a lengthy chronology of landmark events, and ten chapters, each revolving around the lives of two individuals who are in some way emblematic of their times, this provides a window on the social, economic, and political history of US democracy from the antebellum period to the present.

American Icons

Author:

Publisher: Roberts Rinehart Pub

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 192

View: 387

This volume contains 145 enduring images that comprise photographer Gottlieb's tribute to things that are quintessentially American, from hot dogs at the ball park to the somber vigil of Marine guards at the tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Arlington cemetery. 145 photos.

In Search of Mary

The Woman and the Symbol

Author: Sally Cunneen

Publisher: Ballantine Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 432

View: 674

Mary--relic of the religious past or beacon of the future? Mary is more alive today than she was in the early Christian church, surfacing in art and worship in almost every culture on earth. Her appeal bridges the gap between the devotional and the secular, the uneducated and the sophisticated. But who is Mary and what exactly does she symbolize? How did a humble Jewish girl become the most honored woman in human history? Why is there so little about Mary in the Bible and so much about her in the art and history of Christianity, East and West? And why, in an age dominated by science and technology, does devotion to Mary persist? In Search of Mary is Sally Cunneen's provocative response to these questions. As Cunneen eloquently points out, in order to see Mary whole, it is important to look at all the different visions and versions of her, revisiting history through the eyes of a present day searcher. Including the latest findings by historians, anthropologists, and psychologists, as well as art historians and religious scholars, In Search of Mary reveals what we know about the life of Mary, follows the history and development of her image over the last two thousand years, and explores the different ways that Mary has transformed the lives of people today. As we struggle for greater unity in a divided world, In Search of Mary shows us a woman who can touch all people, regardless of their backgrounds. She is a profound reminder of the presence of the holy in ordinary life.

Indian Nation

Native American Literature and Nineteenth-century Nationalisms

Author: Cheryl Walker

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 646

Indian Nation documents the contributions of Native Americans to the notion of American nationhood and to concepts of American identity at a crucial, defining time in U.S. history. Departing from previous scholarship, Cheryl Walker turns the "usual" questions on their heads, asking not how whites experienced indigenous peoples, but how Native Americans envisioned the United States as a nation. This project unfolds a narrative of participatory resistance in which Indians themselves sought to transform the discourse of nationhood. Walker examines the rhetoric and writings of nineteenth-century Native Americans, including William Apess, Black Hawk, George Copway, John Rollin Ridge, and Sarah Winnemucca. Demonstrating with unique detail how these authors worked to transform venerable myths and icons of American identity, Indian Nation chronicles Native American participation in the forming of an American nationalism in both published texts and speeches that were delivered throughout the United States. Pottawattomie Chief Simon Pokagon's "The Red Man's Rebuke," an important document of Indian oratory, is published here in its entirety for the first time since 1893. By looking at this writing through the lens of the best theoretical work on nationality, postcoloniality, and the subaltern, Walker creates a new and encompassing picture of the relationship between Native Americans and whites. She shows that, contrary to previous studies, America in the nineteenth century was intercultural in significant ways.