Narrative Fiction

Contemporary Poetics

Author: Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 645

What is a narrative? What is narrative fiction? How does it differ from other kinds of narrative? What featuers turn a discourse into a narrative text? Now widely acknowledged as one of the most significant volumes in its field, Narrative Fiction turns its attention to these and other questions. In contrast to many other studies, Narrative Fiction is organized arround issues - such as events, time, focalization, characterization, narration, the text and its reading - rather than individual theorists or approaches. Within this structure, Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan addresses key approaches to narrative fiction, including New Criticism, formlaism, structuralism and phenomenology, but also offers views of the modifications to these theroies. While presenting an analysis of the system governing all fictional narratives, whether in the form of novel, short story or narrative poem, she also suggests how individual narratives can be studied against the background of this general system. A broad range of literary examples illustrate key aspects of the study. This edition is brought fully up-to-date with an invaluable new chapter, reflecting on recent developments in narratology. Readers are also directed to key recent works in the field. These additions to a classic text ensure that Narrative Fiction will remain the ideal starting point for anyone new to narrative theory.

Strange Voices in Narrative Fiction

Author: Per Krogh Hansen

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 274

View: 708

From its beginnings narratology has incorporated a communicative model of literary narratives, considering these as simulations of natural, oral acts of communication. This approach, however, has had some problems with accounting for the strangeness and anomalies of modern and postmodern narratives. As many skeptics have shown, not even classical realism conforms to the standard set by oral or ‘natural’ storytelling. Thus, an urge to confront narratology with the difficult task of reconsidering a most basic premise in its theoretical and analytical endeavors has, for some time, been undeniable. During the 2000s, Nordic narratologists have been among the most active and insistent critics of the communicative model. They share a marked skepticism towards the idea of using ‘natural’ narratives as a model for understanding and interpreting all kinds of narratives, and for all of them, the distinction of fiction is of vital importance. This anthology presents a collection of new articles that deal with strange narratives, narratives of the strange, or, more generally, with the strangeness of fiction, and even with some strange aspects of narratology.

Transgression in Swahili Narrative Fiction and its Reception

Author: Rémi Armand Tchokothe

Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 514

"This book remarkably analyses the development of recent Swahili prose narrative. The main thesis is that since the 90s, Swahili literature has developed to go beyond aspects that had hitherto conditioned literature in African languages (local, popular and didactic) and has opened itself to global, sophisticated and subversive perspectives. Remi Tchokothe uses the leitmotif of transgression as the unifying thread to render an account of this evolution of the Swahili narrative fiction towards the disruption of narrative linearity, an increase in intertextual references, an awareness of globalisation in political analysis and a shift to magical realism. The finishing touch to the analysis is a meticulously conducted reception survey which highlights editorial ambiguities that go with the transgressive turn." -- Xavier Garnier, U. Sorbonne Nouvelle - Paris 3 (Series: Contributions to Research on Africa / Beitrage zur Afrikaforschung - Vol. 56

About Time: Narrative, Fiction and the Philosophy of Time

Narrative, Fiction and the Philosophy of Time

Author: Mark Currie

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 383

Why have theorists approached narrative primarily as a form of retrospect? Mark Currie argues that anticipation and other forms of projection into the future are vital for an understanding of narrative and its effects in the world. In a series of arguments and readings, he offers an account of narrative as both anticipation and retrospection, linking fictional time experiments (in Ali Smith, Ian McEwan, Martin Amis and Graham Swift) to exhilarating philosophical themes about presence and futurity. This is an argument that shows that narrative lies at the heart of modern experiences of time, structuring the present, whether personal or collective, as the object of a future memory as much as it records the past.

Style and Rhetoric of Short Narrative Fiction

Covert Progressions Behind Overt Plots

Author: Dan Shen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 176

View: 185

In many fictional narratives, the progression of the plot exists in tension with a very different and powerful dynamic that runs, at a hidden and deeper level, throughout the text. In this volume, Dan Shen systematically investigates how stylistic analysis is indispensable for uncovering this covert progression through rhetorical narrative criticism. The book brings to light the covert progressions in works by the American writers Edgar Allan Poe, Stephan Crane and Kate Chopin and British writer Katherine Mansfield.

Babysitting the Reader

Translating English Narrative Fiction for Girls Into Dutch (1946-1995)

Author: Mieke K. T. Desmet

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 352

View: 171

This comparative study looks at the way English books for girls are imported and translated into Dutch and Flemish culture. Fiction for girls has existed in Flanders and the Netherlands for more than one hundred years and started with the translation of "Little Women" into Dutch in 1876. Original fiction for girls in Dutch has developed especially in the Netherlands. Translations from English, German and French played an important role in developing the genre over time and Flanders plays an important role in bringing translations of narrative fiction for girls on the Dutch-Flemish market. Translations take many forms and the way a narrative is translated can vary a lot. It is often assumed that only the best of other cultures is translated, but that is not really the case. A large proportion of the translations analyzed in this study are popular fiction series which were heavily adapted and changed in the translation process. The same is true of classic girls' texts, such as "Little Women," which are often unrecognizable in translation. However, not all translations take that many liberties with the original and many award-winning books are translated in a faithful way.

Coincidence and Counterfactuality

Plotting Time and Space in Narrative Fiction

Author: Hilary P. Dannenberg

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 289

View: 843

In Coincidence and Counterfactuality, a groundbreaking analysis of plot, Hilary P. Dannenberg sets out to answer the perennial question of how to tell a good story. While plot is among the most integral aspects of storytelling, it is perhaps the least studied aspect of narrative. Using plot theory to chart the development of narrative fiction from the Renaissance to the present, Dannenberg demonstrates how the novel has evolved over time and how writers have developed increasingly complex narrative strategies that tap into key cognitive parameters familiar to the reader from real-life experience. ø Dannenberg proposes a new, multidimensional theory for analyzing time and space in narrative fiction, then uses this theory to trace the historical evolution of narrative fiction by focusing on coincidence and counterfactuality. These two key plot strategiesøare constructed around pivotal moments when characters? life trajectories, or sometimes the paths of history, converge or diverge. The study?s rich historical and textual scope reveals how narrative traditions and genres such as romance and realism or science fiction and historiographic metafiction, rather than being separated by clear boundaries are in fact in a continual process of interaction and cross-fertilization. In highlighting critical stages in the historical development of narrative fiction, the study produces new readings of works by pinpointing the innovative role played by particular authors in this evolutionary process. Dannenberg?s original investigation of plot patterns is interdisciplinary, incorporating research from narrative theory, cognitive approaches to literature, social psychology, possible worlds theory, and feminist approaches to narrative.

Telling Stories

A Theoretical Analysis of Narrative Fiction

Author: Steven Cohan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 810

Telling Stories overturns traditional definitions of narrative by arguing that any story, whether a Bette Davis film, a jeans ad, a Jane Austen novel of a 'Cathy' comic, must be related to larger cultural networks. The authors show how meanings and subjectivity do not exist in isolation, but are manufactured by the narratives our culture reads and watches every day. They call for a critical practice that, through the fracturing of texts, can alter the grounds of knowledge and interpretation. This timely study will interest critics of narrative and culture, as well as students wanting to extend post-Saussurean theories to poopular and canonical cultures, and to the dynamics of story-telling itself.

Narrative Fiction

Contemporary Poetics

Author: Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 173

View: 842

Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan addresses key approaches to narrative fiction, from New Criticism to Phenomenology, but also offers views on and modifications to these theories.