My Life in Court

Author: Louis Nizer

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 542

View: 594

In this electrifying bestseller, the shrewd and voluble trial lawyer Louis Nizer, who made a long career of representing famous people in famous cases, recounts some of his significant civil and criminal cases. Nizer rose to national fame with his real-life accounts of tension-filled courtrooms and the fervor of the advocate, and “My Life in Court” proved to be no exception: it rose to the top of the Times’s best-seller list on its publication in 1961 and logged 72 weeks as a sales leader. The book is an in-depth collection of some of Mr. Nizer’s court case success stories, including his client Quentin Reynolds’ famous libel action against the columnist Westbrook Pegler, which would also become the basis of the 1963 Broadway play “A Case of Libel.” Praised by critics as “entertaining and philosophically instructive, an unusual combination,” Nizer’s movie-like plots of real-life courtroom drama will keep you captivated until the very last page.

My Life

Queen of the Court

Author: Serena Williams

Publisher: Pocket Books

ISBN:

Category: African American women tennis players

Page: 257

View: 272

One of the biggest stars in tennis, Serena Williams has captured every major title. From growing up in the tough neighborhood of Compton, California, to being trained by her father on courts littered with broken glass and drug paraphernalia, to becoming the top women's player in the world, Serena has proven to be an inspiration to her legions of fans. Her accomplishments have not been won without struggle. She has been derailed by injury, criticized for her unorthodox approach to tennis, and was devastated by the tragic shooting of her older sister. Yet somehow Serena always manages to prevail, both on and off the court. She's applied the same strength and determination that helped her to become a champion to her successful pursuits in philanthropy, fashion, television, and film. In this compelling and poignant memoir, Serena takes an empowering look at her extraordinary life and what is still to come.

Disorder in the Court: Great Fractured Moments in Courtroom History

Author: Charles M. Sevilla

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 256

View: 660

In America's courtooms, the verdict is laughter. Sit back and enjoy a collection of verbatim exchanges from the halls of justice, where defendants and plaintiffs, lawyers and witnesses, juries and judges, collide to produce memorably insane comedy. A: You mumbled on the first part of that and I couldn't understand what you were saying. Could you repeat the question? Q: I mumbled, did I? Well, we'll just ask the court reporter to read back what I said. She didn't indicate any problem understanding what I said, so obviously she understood every word. We'll just have her read my question back and find out if there was any mumbling going on. Madam reporter, would you be so kind? Court Reporter: Mumble, mumble, mumble, mumble, mumble.

Life Sentence

Stories from Four Decades of Court Reporting -- or, How I Fell Out of Love with the Canadian Justice System (Especially Judges)

Author: Christie Blatchford

Publisher: Doubleday Canada

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 791

A beloved crime reporter revisits some of her biggest assignments and passes judgement on our judicial system—and especially its judges—in this national bestseller. When Christie Blatchford wandered into a Toronto courtroom in 1978 for the start of the first criminal trial she would cover as a newspaper reporter, little did she know she was also at the start of a self-imposed life sentence. She has been reporting from Canadian courtrooms for the Toronto Star, The Globe and Mail and the National Post ever since. Back in '78, she loved the courts, lawyers and judges, and that persisted for many years. But slowly, surely, she suffered a loss of faith. What happened? It was at the recent Mike Duffy trial she had the epiphany: That judges are the new senators, unelected, unaccountable and overly entitled. Yet unlike senators, they continue to get away with it because any questioning by government or its agents is deemed an intrusion onto judicial independence. In her explosive new book, Christie Blatchford revisits trials from throughout her career and asks the hard questions--about judges playing with the truth--through editing of criminal records, whitewashing of criminal records, pre-trial rulings that kick out evidence the jury can't hear. She discusses bad or troubled judges--how and why they get picked, and what can be done about them. And shows how judges are handmaidens to the state, as in the Bernardo trial when a small-town lawyer and an intellectual writer were pursued with more vigor than Karla Homolka. For anyone interested in the political and judicial fabric of this country, Life Sentence is a remarkable, argumentative, insightful and hugely important book. From the Hardcover edition.

Statutes in Court

The History and Theory of Statutory Interpretation

Author: William D. Popkin

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 340

View: 266

Popkin provides a survey of the history of American statutory interpretation and then offers his own theory of "ordinary judging" that defines the proper scope of judicial discretion."--BOOK JACKET.

Lawyers, Law, and Social Change

Author: Steve Bachmann

Publisher: Unlimited Publishing LLC

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 220

View: 207

Collection of essays about law and social activism by widely published legal theorist Steve Bachmann, General Counsel to the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now.