Music Theory and the Exploration of the Past

Author: Christopher Hatch

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 561

View: 172

In recent decades, increased specialization has sharply separated music theory from historical musicology. Music Theory and the Exploration of the Past brings together a group of essays—written by theorists and musicologists—that seek to bridge this gap. This collection shows that music theory can join forces with historical musicology to produce a more humanistic form of musical scholarship. In nineteen essays dealing with musical theories from the twelfth to the twentieth century, two recurring themes emerge. One is the need to understand the historical circumstances of the writing and reception of theory, a humanistic approach that gives theory a place within social and intellectual history. The other is the advantages of applying contemporaneous theory to the music of a given period, thus linking theory to the history of musical styles and structures. The periods given principal attention in these essays are the Renaissance, the years around 1800, and the twentieth century. Abundantly illustrated with musical examples, Music Theory and the Exploration of the Past offers models of new practical applications of theory to the analysis of music. At the same time, it raises the broader question of how historical knowledge can deepen the understanding of an art and of systematic writings about that art.

Music Theory and the Exploration of the Past

Author: Christopher Hatch

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 576

View: 839

In recent decades, increased specialization has sharply separated music theory from historical musicology. Music Theory and the Exploration of the Past brings together a group of essays—written by theorists and musicologists—that seek to bridge this gap. This collection shows that music theory can join forces with historical musicology to produce a more humanistic form of musical scholarship. In nineteen essays dealing with musical theories from the twelfth to the twentieth century, two recurring themes emerge. One is the need to understand the historical circumstances of the writing and reception of theory, a humanistic approach that gives theory a place within social and intellectual history. The other is the advantages of applying contemporaneous theory to the music of a given period, thus linking theory to the history of musical styles and structures. The periods given principal attention in these essays are the Renaissance, the years around 1800, and the twentieth century. Abundantly illustrated with musical examples, Music Theory and the Exploration of the Past offers models of new practical applications of theory to the analysis of music. At the same time, it raises the broader question of how historical knowledge can deepen the understanding of an art and of systematic writings about that art.

Music Theory in the Age of Romanticism

Author: Ian Bent

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 239

View: 790

How did the Romantic era hear the music of Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, or Berlioz? What did it make of the Eroica, the Fantastic Symphony, or the eerie song Der Doppelgänger? From many different vantage points this volume addresses this fascinating question. A group of writers, all historians of music theory, conducts a dazzling exploration of the way in which the Romantic era thought about music. They bring to bear on their topic issues from politics, gender, metaphor, intersubjectivity, cognition, and many other realms.

Musical Theory in the Renaissance

Author: CristleCollins Judd

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 359

This volume of essays draws together recent work on historical music theory of the Renaissance. The collection spans the major themes addressed by Renaissance writers on music and highlights the differing approaches to this body of work by modern scholars, including: historical and theoretical perspectives; consideration of the broader cultural context for writing about music in the Renaissance; and the dissemination of such work. Selected from a variety of sources ranging from journals, monographs and specialist edited volumes, to critical editions, translations and facsimiles, these previously published articles reflect a broad chronological and geographical span, and consider Renaissance sources that range from the overtly pedagogical to the highly speculative. Taken together, this collection enables consideration of key essays side by side aided by the editor‘s introductory essay which highlights ongoing debates and offers a general framework for interpreting past and future directions in the study of historical music theory from the Renaissance.

The Cambridge History of Western Music Theory

Author: Thomas Christensen

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page:

View: 514

The Cambridge History of Western Music Theory is the first comprehensive history of Western music theory to be published in the English language. A collaborative project by leading music theorists and historians, the volume traces the rich panorama of music-theoretical thought from the Ancient Greeks to the present day. Recognizing the variety and complexity of music theory as an historical subject, the volume has been organized within a flexible framework. Some chapters are defined chronologically within a restricted historical domain, whilst others are defined conceptually and span longer historical periods. Together the thirty-one chapters present a synthetic overview of the fascinating and complex subject that is historical music theory. Richly enhanced with illustrations, graphics, examples and cross-citations as well as being thoroughly indexed and supplemented by comprehensive bibliographies of the most important primary and secondary literature, this book will be an invaluable resource for students and scholars alike.

Music Theory and Analysis in the Writings of Arnold Schoenberg (1874-1951)

Author: Norton Dudeque

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 296

View: 704

Arnold Schoenberg's theory of music has been much discussed but his approach to music theory needs a new historical and theoretical assessment in order to provide a clearer understanding of his contributions to music theory and analysis. Norton Dudeque's achievement in this book involves the synthesis of Schoenberg's theoretical ideas from the whole of the composer's working life, including material only published well after his death. The book discusses Schoenberg's rejection of his German music theory heritage and past approaches to music-theory pedagogy, the need for looking at musical structures differently and to avoid aesthetic and stylistic issues. Dudeque provides a unique understanding of the systematization of Schoenberg's tonal-harmonic theory, thematic/motivic-development theory and the links with contemporary and past music theories. The book is complemented by a special section that explores the practical application of the theoretical material already discussed. The focus of this section is on Schoenberg's analytical practice, and the author's response to it. Norton Dudeque therefore provides a comprehensive understanding of Schoenberg's thinking on tonal harmony, motive and form that has hitherto not been attempted.

The Oxford Handbook of Neo-Riemannian Music Theories

Author: Edward Gollin

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 648

View: 816

In recent years neo-Riemannian theory has established itself as the leading approach of our time, and has proven particularly adept at explaining features of chromatic music. The Oxford Handbook of Neo-Riemannian Music Theories assembles an international group of leading music theory scholars in an exploration of the music-analytical, theoretical, and historical aspects of this new field.

The Work of Music Theory

Selected Essays

Author: Thomas Christensen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 404

View: 524

This collection brings together an anthology of articles by Thomas Christensen, one of the leading historians of music theory active today. Published over the span of the past 25 years, the selected articles provide a historical conspectus about a range of vital topics in the history of music theory, focusing in particular upon writings from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Christensen examines a variety of theorists and their arguments within the intellectual and musical contexts of their time, in the process highlighting the diverse and idiosyncratic nature of the discipline of music theory itself. In the first section of the book Christensen offers general reflections on the meaning and interpretation of historical music theories, with especial attention paid to their value for music theorists today. The second section of the book contains a number of articles that consider the catalytic role of the thorough bass in the development of harmonic theory during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In the final two sections of the anthology, focus turns to the writings of several individual music theorists, including Marin Mersenne, Seth Calvisius, Johann Mattheson, Johann Nicolaus Bach, Denis Diderot and Johann Nichelmann. The volume includes essays from hard-to-find publications as well as newly-translated material and the articles are prefaced by a new, wide-ranging autobiographical essay by the author that offers a broad re-assessment of his historical project. This book is essential reading for music theorists and seventeenth- and eighteenth-century musicologists.

Music Theory, Analysis, and Society

Selected Essays

Author: RobertP. Morgan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 885

Robert P. Morgan is one of a small number of music theorists writing in English who treat music theory, and in particular Schenkerian theory, as part of general intellectual life. Morgan‘s writings are renowned within the field of music scholarship: he is the author of the well-known Norton volume Twentieth-Century Music, and of additional books relating to Schenkerian and other theory, analysis and society. This volume of Morgan‘s previously published essays encompasses a broad range of issues, including historical and social issues and is of importance to anyone concerned with modern Western music. His specially written introduction treats his writings as a whole but also provides additional material relating to the articles included in this volume.

Analyzing Atonal Music

Pitch-class Set Theory and Its Contexts

Author: Michiel Schuijer

Publisher: University Rochester Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 306

View: 830

An engaging study -- the first ever -- of the principles used by noted scholars to unravel the masterpieces of Schoenberg, Stravinsky, and other modernists.