Mrs Miles's Diary

The Wartime Journal of a Housewife on the Home Front

Author: Constance Miles

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 709

At the outbreak of the Second World War Constance Miles was living with her husband in the pretty Surrey village of Shere. A prolific correspondent with a keen interest in current affairs, Constance kept a war journal from 1939 to 1943, recording in vivid detail what life was like for women on the Home Front. She writes of the impact of evacuees, of food shortages and the creative uses of what food there was, and the fears of the local populace, who wonder how they will cope. She tells of refugees from central Europe billeted in village houses and, later in the war, of the influx of American servicemen. She travels frequently to London, mourning the destruction of familiar landmarks and recording the devastation of the Blitz, but still finds time for tea in the Strand. A woman of strong convictions, Mrs Miles is not afraid to voice her opinion on public figures and her worries about the social upheavals she feels certain to follow the war. But most of all her journals record an overlooked aspect of the conflict: the impact on communities outside of major cities, who endured hardships we find hard to imagine today. It is a fascinating document that makes for compulsive reading.

Nursing Churchill

Wartime Life from the Private Letters of Winston Churchill's Nurse

Author: Jill Rose

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 294

A fresh perspective on Churchill and life in wartime by the nurse charged with looking after the Prime Minister.

Mrs. Simcoe's Diary

Author: Elizabeth Simcoe

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 272

View: 910

Elizabeth Simcoe's diary, describing Canada from 1791 to 1796, is history written as it was being made ? an account instilled with excitement and delight.

The Purple Diaries

Mary Astor and the Most Sensational Hollywood Scandal of the 1930s

Author: Joseph Egan

Publisher: Diversion Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 356

View: 810

One of Hollywood’s first scandals was nearly its last. 1936 looked like it would be a great year for the movie industry. With the economy picking up after the Great Depression, Americans everywhere were sitting in the dark watching the stars—and few stars shined as brightly as one of America’s most enduring screen favorites, Mary Astor. But Astor’s story wasn’t a happy one. She was born poor, and at the first sign that she could earn money, her parents grabbed the reins and the checks. Widowed at twenty-four, Mary Astor was looking for stability when she met and wed Dr. Franklyn Thorpe. But the marriage was rocky from the start; both were unfaithful, but they did not divorce until after Mary Astor gave birth to little Marylyn Thorpe. What followed was a custody battle that pushed The Spanish Civil War and Hitler’s 1936 Olympic Games off of the front pages all over America. Astor and Thorpe were both ruthless in their fight to gain custody of their daughter, but Thorpe held a trump card: the diaries that Mary Astor had been keeping for years. In these diaries, Astor detailed her own affairs as well as the myriad dalliances of some of Hollywood’s biggest names. The studio heads, longtime controllers of public perception, were desperate to keep such juicy details from leaking. With the complete support of the Astor family, including unlimited access to the photographs and memorabilia of Mary Astor’s estate, The Purples Diaries is a look at Hollywood’s Golden Age as it has never been seen before, as Egan spins a wildly absorbing yarn about a scandal that threatened to bring down the dream factory known as Hollywood.

A Diary from Dixie

Author: Mary Boykin Miller Chesnut

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 572

View: 703

In her diary, Mary Boykin Chesnut, the wife of a Confederate general and aid to president Jefferson Davis, James Chestnut, Jr., presents an eyewitness account of the Civil War.

The Diary of Nannie Haskins Williams

A Southern Woman’s Story of Rebellion and Reconstruction, 1863–1890

Author: Nannie Haskins Williams

Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 371

View: 813

In 1863, while living in Clarksville, Tennessee, Martha Ann Haskins, known to friends and family as Nannie, began a diary. This document provides valuable insights into the conditions in occupied Middle Tennessee. A young, elite Confederate sympathizer, Nannie was on the cusp of adulthood with the expectation of becoming a mistress in a slaveholding society. The war ended this prospect, and her life was forever changed. Though this is the first time the diaries have been published in full, they are well known among Civil War scholars, and voice-overs from them were used in Ken Burns's PBS program "The Civil War." Sixteen-year-old Nannie had to come to terms with Union occupation very early in the war. Amid school assignments, young friendship, social events, worries about her marital prospects, and tension with her mother, Nannie's entries also mixed information about battles, neighbors wounded in combat, U.S. Colored troops, and lawlessness in the surrounding countryside. Providing rare detail about daily life in an occupied city, Nannie's diary poignantly recounts how she and those around her continued to fight, long after the war was over, to maintain their lives in a war-torn community. Though numerous women's Civil War diaries exist, Nannie's is unique in that she also recounts her postwar life and the unexpected financial struggles she and her family experienced in the post-Reconstruction South. Nannie represents a generation of young women born into a society based on slavery but who faced mature adulthood in an entirely new world of decreasing farm values, increasing industrialization, and young women entering the workforce.--From publisher description.

Life, Death, and Growing Up on the Western Front

Author: Anthony Fletcher

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 263

DIV This book was inspired by the author’s discovery of an extraordinary cache of letters from a soldier who was killed on the Western Front during the First World War. The soldier was his grandfather, and the letters had been tucked away, unread and unmentioned for many decades. Intrigued by the heartbreak and history of these family letters, Fletcher sought out the correspondence of other British soldiers who had volunteered for the fight against Germany. This resulting volume offers a vivid account of the physical and emotional experiences of seventeen British soldiers whose letters survive. Drawn from different regiments, social backgrounds, and areas of England and Scotland, they include twelve officers and five ordinary “Tommies.”/div DIV /div DIV The book explores the training, journey to France, fear, shellshock, and life in the trenches as well as the leisure, love, and home leave the soldiers dreamed of. Fletcher discusses the psychological responses of 17- and 18-year-old men facing appalling realities and considers the particular pressures on those who survived their fallen comrades. While acknowledging the horror and futility the soldiers of the Great War experienced, the author shows another side to the story, focusing new attention on the loyal comradeship, robust humor, and strong morale that uplifted the men at the Front and created a powerful bond among them./div

The Journal of Mrs Fenton

A Narrative of Her Life in India, the Isle of France (Mauritius) and Tasmania During the Years 1826-1830

Author: Elizabeth Fenton

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 410

View: 481

Mrs Fenton's account of Calcutta, Mauritius and Tasmania provides rare insights into the life of an adventurous nineteenth-century woman.