More Lives than One: A Biography of Hans Fallada

Author: Jenny Williams

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 365

Hans Fallada was a drug addict, womanizer, alcoholic, jailbird and thief. Yet he was also one of the most extraordinary storytellers of the twentieth century, whose novels, including Alone in Berlin, portrayed ordinary people in terrible times with a powerful humanity. This acclaimed biography, newly revised and completely updated, tells the remarkable story of Hans Fallada, whose real name was Rudolf Ditzen. Jenny Williams chronicles his turbulent life as a writer, husband and father, shadowed by mental torment and long periods in psychiatric care. She shows how Ditzen's decision to remain in Nazi Germany in 1939 led to his self-destruction, but also made him a unique witness to his country's turmoil. More Lives Than One unpicks the contradictory, flawed and fascinating life of a writer who saw the worst of humanity, yet maintained his belief in the decency of the 'little man'.

Berlin's Culturescape in the 20th Century

Author: Thomas Bredohl

Publisher: University of Regina Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 274

View: 779

Berlin's Culturescape in the Twentieth Century reflects the many facets of Berlin's unique development as a cultural metropolis. At the centre of this compilation of essays is the notion of culturescape as a concept that describes the cultural expressions and identities that occur within a given urban space. From industrialization and modernization to division and subsequent reunification, Berlin has been the flashpoint of German history and culture. This bilingual volume (five German chapters and seven English chapters) provides a discourse that examines expressions of the city's literature, film, and fashion.

Topography and Literature

Berlin and Modernism

Author: Reinhard Zachau

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 187

View: 703

Die Beiträge der gleichnamigen Tagung an der University of the South in Tennessee, USA, untersuchen die Beziehung zwischen der Auswirkung des Berliner Stadtraums auf künstlerische Darstellungen. In einem ersten Teil werden die Wilhelminischen Stadtsymbole und die einsetzende moderne Stadtplanung in Beziehung zu Berliner Flaneuren wie Georg Hermann und Robert Walser gebracht. Der Schwerpunkt des Bandes liegt im zweiten Teil, wo die Auswirkungen der Stadtplanung auf Kunst und Literatur im Berlin der Weimarzeit im Mittelpunkt stehen. In diesem Teil zeigen eine Reihe von Einzeldarstellungen Aspekte der Wechselwirkung von Raum und Kunstprodukt u. a. bei Otto Dix, Walter Ruttmann, Hans Fallada und Alfred Döblin. Den Abschluss bilden Beiträge über das Fortwirken von Weimars Moderne in der heutigen Zeit.

Nonconformist Writing in Nazi Germany

The Literature of Inner Emigration

Author: John Klapper

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN:

Category: Anti-Nazi movement in literature

Page: 453

View: 890

An innovative, critical, historically informed, yet accessible reassessment of writers who remained in Nazi Germany and Austria yet expressed nonconformity - even dissent - through their fiction.

Once a Jailbird

Author: Hans Fallada

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 496

View: 611

For Willi Kufult, prison life means staying out of trouble, keeping his cell clean, snagging a precious piece of tobacco - and dreaming of the day of his release. Then he gets out. As Willi tries to make a new life for himself in Hamburg, finding a job and even love, he still cannot escape his past. Gradually he becomes sucked into a world of drink, desperation and deceit, and with one terrible act, he is ensnared in a noose of his own making... Hans Fallada's dark and moving 1934 novel brilliantly describes a seedy criminal underworld of shabby lives and violent deeds, showing how our actions always catch up with us.

Walter Greenwood's Love on the Dole

Novel, Play, Film

Author: Chris Hopkins

Publisher: Liverpool English Texts and St

ISBN:

Category: Drama

Page: 336

View: 208

Love on the Dole (1933), the iconic novel about 1930s British working-class life, has a significant place in British cultural history. Its author, Walter Greenwood, went from unemployed Salford man to best-selling writer, and the novel has never been out of print. The 1935 stage adaptation was said to have been seen by three million people by 1940, including the King and Queen. Greenwood proposed a film adaption in 1936, but the story was pronounced too 'sordid' and depressing' by the British Board of Film Censors. However, in 1940 the Ministry of Information decided that this story of pre-war economic and social failure should be filmed as a contribution to the 'people's war'. It was widely regarded as one of the best British wartime productions - and all three versions of Love on the Dole were frequently referenced during wartime debate about how a reconstructed post-war society should make a repetition of the 1930s impossible. This study explores in detail what made this important text so influential, analyses the considerable differences between the novel, play and film versions and places the public response to Love on the Dole in its full historical context. It examines Greenwood's whole literary career and his continuing success until the 1960s: casting new light on his subsequent novels, plays and non-fiction works, few of which have received critical attention.

Tales from the Underworld

Selected Shorter Fiction

Author: Hans Fallada

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 416

View: 929

Darkly funny, searingly honest short stories from Hans Fallada, author of bestselling Alone in Berlin In these stories, criminals lament how hard it is to scrape a living by breaking and entering; families measure their daily struggles in marks and pfennigs; a convict makes a desperate leap from a moving train; a ring - and with it a marriage - is lost in a basket of potatoes. Here, as in his novels, Fallada is by turns tough, darkly funny, streetwise and effortlessly engaging, writing with acute feeling about ordinary lives shaped by forces larger than themselves: addiction, love, money.

White Collar

The American Middle Classes

Author: C. Wright Mills

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 416

View: 428

In print for fifty years, White Collar by C. Wright Mills is considered a standard on the subject of the new middle class in twentieth-century America. This landmark volume demonstrates how the conditions and styles of middle class life--originating from elements of both the newer lower and upper classes--represent modern society as a whole. By examining white-collar life, Mills aimed to learn something about what was becoming more typically "American" than the once-famous Western frontier character. He painted a picture instead of a society that had evolved into a business-based milieu, viewing America instead as a great salesroom, an enormous file, and a new universe of management. Russell Jacoby, author of The End of Utopia and The Last Intellectuals, contributes a new Afterword to this edition, in which he reflects on the impact White Collar had at its original publication and considers what it means to our society today. "A book that persons of every level of the white collar pyramid should read and ponder. It will alert them to their condition for their better salvation."-Horace M. Kaellen, The New York Times (on the first edition)

Privacy and Power

A Transatlantic Dialogue in the Shadow of the NSA-Affair

Author: Russell A. Miller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 805

View: 271

This book documents and explains the differences in the ways Americans and Europeans approach the issues of privacy and intelligence gathering.

Individuality and Modernity in Berlin

Self and Society from Weimar to the Wall

Author: Moritz Föllmer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 100

Moritz Föllmer offers a pioneering analysis of individuality and its importance to metropolitan society in twentieth-century Berlin.

Encyclopedia of German Literature

Author: Matthias Konzett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1136

View: 552

First Published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Harmful and Undesirable

Book Censorship in Nazi Germany

Author: Guenter Lewy

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: HISTORY

Page: 272

View: 638

"The first English language study of book censorship in Nazi Germany, this book describes the way in which various state and party organizations in Germany exerted control over the creation, publication, and distribution of books. By presenting the fate of authors and publishers, who came into conflict with the organs of censorship, it sheds light on intellectual life under the Nazi dictatorship"--

The Third Reich in Power, 1933 - 1939

How the Nazis Won Over the Hearts and Minds of a Nation

Author: Richard J. Evans

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 960

View: 956

The Third Reich in Power examines how it was possible for a group of ideological obsessive to remould a society famous for its sophistication and complexity into a one-party state directed at war and race hate. Richard J. Evans shows how the Nazis won over the hearts and minds of German citizens, twisted science, religion and culture, and transformed the economy, education, law and order to achieve total dominance in German politics and society. Drawing on an extraordinary range of research, blending narrative, description and analysis he creates a picture of a dictatorship consumed by visceral hatreds and ambitions and driven by war.

The Third Reich

Charisma and Community

Author: Martin Kitchen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 424

View: 830

The twelve years of the Third Reich casts a dark shadow over history. Fierce debates still rage over many of the hows, whys and wherefores of this perplexing period. Leading expert on German history, Martin Kitchen, provides a concise, accessible and provocative account of Nazi Germany. It takes into account the political, social, economic and cultural ramifications, and sets it within the context of the times, while pointing out those areas that still defy our understanding. This lively account addresses major issues such as the reasons for Hitler’s extraordinary popularity, his hold over the German people even when all seemed lost, the role of ideology, the cooption of the elites, and the descent into war for race and space, culminating in the horrors of the holocaust.

Opium

Reality's Dark Dream

Author: Thomas Dormandy

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 340

Opium and its derivatives morphine and heroin have destroyed, corrupted, and killed individuals, families, communities, and even whole nations. And yet, for most of its long history, opium has also been humanity's most effective means of alleviating physical and mental pain. This extraordinary book encompasses the entire history of the world's most fascinating drug, from the first evidence of poppy cultivation by stone-age man to the present-day opium trade in Afghanistan. Dr. Thomas Dormandy tells the story with verve and insight, uncovering the strange power of opiates to motivate major conflicts yet also inspire great art and medical breakthroughs, to trigger the rise of global criminal networks yet also revolutionize attitudes toward well-being. Opium: Reality's Dark Dream traverses the globe and the centuries, exploring opium's role in colonialism, the Chinese Opium Wars, laudanum-inspired sublime Romantic poetry, American "Yellow Peril" fears, the rise of the Mafia and the black market, 1960s counterculture, and more. Dr. Dormandy also recounts exotic or sad stories of individual addiction. Throughout the book the author emphasizes opium's complex, valuable relationship with developments in medicine, health, and disease, highlighting the perplexing dual nature of the drug as both the cause and relief of great suffering in widely diverse civilizations.

Culture in the Third Reich

Author: Moritz Föllmer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 475

'It's like being in a dream', commented Joseph Goebbels when he visited Nazi-occupied Paris in the summer of 1940. Dream and reality did indeed intermingle in the culture of the Third Reich, racialist fantasies and spectacular propaganda set-pieces contributing to this atmosphere alongside more benign cultural offerings such as performances of classical music or popular film comedies. A cultural palette that catered to the tastes of the majority helped encourage acceptance of the regime. The Third Reich was therefore eager to associate itself with comfortable middle-brow conventionality, while at the same time exploiting the latest trends that modern mass culture had to offer. And it was precisely because the culture of the Nazi period accommodated such a range of different needs and aspirations that it was so successfully able to legitimize war, imperial domination, and destruction. Moritz Föllmer turns the spotlight on this fundamental aspect of the Third Reich's successful cultural appeal in this ground-breaking new study, investigating what 'culture' meant for people in the years between 1933 and 1945: for convinced National Socialists at one end of the spectrum, via the legions of the apparently 'unpolitical', right through to anti-fascist activists, Jewish people, and other victims of the regime at the other end of the spectrum. Relating the everyday experience of people living under Nazism, he is able to give us a privileged insight into the question of why so many Germans enthusiastically embraced the regime and identified so closely with it.

Blood Horses

Notes of a Sportswriter's Son

Author: John Jeremiah Sullivan

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 272

View: 605

One evening late in his life, veteran sportswriter Mike Sullivan was asked by his son what he remembered best from his three decades in the press box. The answer came as a surprise. "I was at Secretariat's Derby, in '73. That was . . . just beauty, you know?" Sullivan didn't know, not really: the track had always been a place his father disappeared to once a year on business, a source of souvenir glasses and inscrutable passions in his Kentucky relatives. But in 2000, Sullivan, an editor and essayist for Harper's, decided to educate himself. He spent two years following the horse-both across the country, as he watched one season's juvenile crop prepare for the Triple Crown, and through time, as he tracked the animal's constant evolution in literature and art, from the ponies that appeared on the walls of European caves 30,000 years ago, to the mounts that carried the Indo-European language to the edges of the Old World, to the finely tuned but fragile yearlings that are auctioned off for millions of dollars apiece every spring and fall. The result is a witty, encyclopedic, and in the end profound meditation on what Edwin Muir called our "long-lost archaic companionship" with the horse. Incorporating elements of memoir and reportage, the Wunderkammer and the picture gallery, Blood Horses lets us see--as we have never seen before--the animal that, more than any other, made us who we are.

The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of Berlin

Author: Andrew J. Webber

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 732

This collection of essays by international specialists in the literature of Berlin provides a lively and stimulating account of writing in and about the city in the modern period. The first eight chapters chart key chronological developments from 1750 to the present day, while subsequent chapters focus on Berlin drama and poetry in the twentieth century and explore a set of key identity questions: ethnicity/migration, gender (writing by women), and sexuality (queer writing). Each chapter provides an informative overview along with closer readings of exemplary texts. The volume is designed to be accessible for readers seeking an introduction to the literature of Berlin, while also providing new perspectives for those already familiar with the topic. With a particular focus on the turbulent twentieth century, the account of Berlin's literary production is set against broader cultural and political developments in one of the most fascinating of global cities.

All the Frequent Troubles of Our Days

The True Story of the Woman at the Heart of the German Resistance to Hitler

Author: Rebecca Donner

Publisher: Canongate Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 672

SELECTED AS A BBC RADIO 4 BOOK OF THE WEEK Born and raised in America, Mildred Harnack was twenty-six when she enrolled in a PhD programme in Germany and witnessed the meteoric rise of the Nazi party. In 1932, she began holding secret meetings in her apartment – a small band of political activists that by 1940 had grown into the largest underground resistance group in Berlin. She recruited Germans into the resistance, helped Jews escape, plotted acts of sabotage and collaborated in writing leaflets that denounced Hitler and called for revolution. When the first shots of the Second World War were fired she became a spy, couriering top-secret intelligence to the Allies. On the eve of her escape to Sweden, she was ambushed by the Gestapo. During a hastily convened trial at the Reichskriegsgericht – the Reich Court-Martial – a panel of five judges sentenced her to six years at a prison camp, but Hitler overruled the decision and ordered her execution. On 16 February 1943, she was strapped to a guillotine and beheaded. Harnack’s great-great-niece Rebecca Donner draws on extensive archival research and newly discovered documents in her family archives in this astonishing work of nonfiction. Fusing elements of biography, political thriller and scholarly detective story, Donner brilliantly interweaves letters, diary entries, notes smuggled out of a Berlin prison, survivors’ testimony, and a trove of declassified intelligence documents into a powerful, epic story, reconstructing the moral courage of an enigmatic woman nearly erased by history.

The Routledge Handbook of Literary Translation

Author: Kelly Washbourne

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 586

View: 221

The Routledge Handbook of Literary Translation provides an accessible, diverse and extensive overview of literary translation today. This next-generation volume brings together principles, case studies, precepts, histories and process knowledge from practitioners in sixteen different countries. Divided into four parts, the book covers many of literary translation’s most pressing concerns today, from teaching, to theorising, to translation techniques, to new tools and resources. Featuring genre studies, in which graphic novels, crime fiction, and ethnopoetry have pride of place alongside classics and sacred texts, The Routledge Handbook of Literary Translation represents a vital resource for students and researchers of both translation studies and comparative literature.