Modern British Literature

Author: Ruth Zabriskie Temple

Publisher: Ungar Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 482

View: 768

Gathering Force: Early Modern British Literature in Transition, 1557–1623:

Author: Kristen Poole

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 109

During the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, England grew from a marginal to a major European power, established overseas settlements, and negotiated the Protestant Reformation. The population burgeoned and became increasingly urban. England also saw the meteoric rise of commercial theatre in London, the creation of a vigorous market for printed texts, and the emergence of writing as a viable profession. Literacy rates exploded, and an increasingly diverse audience encountered a profusion of new textual forms. Media, and literary culture, transformed on a scale that would not happen again until television and the Internet. The twenty innovative contributions in Gathering Force: Early Modern Literature in Transition, 1557–1623 trace ways that five different genres both spurred and responded to change. Chapters explore different facets of lyric poetry, romance, commercial drama, masques and pageants, and non-narrative prose. Exciting and accessible, this volume illuminates the dynamic relationships among the period's social, political, and literary transformations.

Political Turmoil: Early Modern British Literature in Transition, 1623–1660:

Author: Stephen B. Dobranski

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 637

The early modern period in Britain was defined by tremendous upheaval - the upending of monarchy, the unsettling of church doctrine, and the pursuit of a new method of inquiry based on an inductive experimental model. Political Turmoil: Early Modern Literature in Transition, 1623–1660 offers an innovative and ambitious re-appraisal of seventeenth-century British literature and history. Each of the contributors attempts to address the 'how' and 'why' of aesthetic change by focusing on political and cultural transformations. Instead of forging a grand narrative of continuity, the contributors attempt to piece together the often complex web of factors and events that contributed to developments in literary form and matter - as well as the social and religious changes that literature sometimes helped to occasion. These twenty chapters, reading across traditional periodization, demonstrate that early modern literary works - when they were conceived, as they were created, and after they circulated - were, above all, involved in various types of transitions.

Emergent Nation: Early Modern British Literature in Transition, 1660–1714:

Author: Elizabeth Sauer

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 619

The years 1660 to 1714 represent a fraught transitional period, one caught between two now dominant periodization rubrics: early modern and the long eighteenth century. Containing narratives of disruption, restoration, and reconfiguration, Emergent Nation: Early Modern British Literature in Transition, 1660–1714 explores the conjunctions and disjunctions between historical and literary developments in this period, when the sociable, rivalrous textual world of letters registered and accelerated changes. Each of the volume's four parts highlights the relationship of various literary forms to a different kind of transformation - generic, ideological, cultural, or local. The five chapters in each section rigorously probe the conditions that affected the period's literary transformations, and interrogate the traditions that canonical and less established writers inherited, adapted, and often challenged. In making a case for an early mimetically produced English nation, this book, through its concentration on literary evidence and transitions also makes innovative contributions to an understanding of nationalism in the period.

Outlaw Fathers in Victorian and Modern British Literature

Queering Patriarchy

Author: Helena Gurfinkel

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 425

Outlaw Fathers provides an innovative reading of fatherhood and father-son relationships in a number of Victorian and modern literary texts. In addition to using a psychoanalytic paradigm for redefining the concept of patriarchy in literary studies and theory, it joins a larger contemporary conversation about changing masculinities and families.

Forces in Modern British Literature 1885-1946

Author: William York Tindall

Publisher: Whitley Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 420

View: 403

PREFACE. THE Author of this very practical treatise on Scotch Loch - Fishing desires clearly that it may be of use to all who had it. He does not pretend to have written anything new, but to have attempted to put what he has to say in as readable a form as possible. Everything in the way of the history and habits of fish has been studiously avoided, and technicalities have been used as sparingly as possible. The writing of this book has afforded him pleasure in his leisure moments, and that pleasure would be much increased if he knew that the perusal of it would create any bond of sympathy between himself and the angling community in general. This section is interleaved with blank shects for the readers notes. The Author need hardly say that any suggestions addressed to the case of the publishers, will meet with consideration in a future edition. We do not pretend to write or enlarge upon a new subject. Much has been said and written-and well said and written too on the art of fishing but loch-fishing has been rather looked upon as a second-rate performance, and to dispel this idea is one of the objects for which this present treatise has been written. Far be it from us to say anything against fishing, lawfully practised in any form but many pent up in our large towns will bear us out when me say that, on the whole, a days loch-fishing is the most convenient. One great matter is, that the loch-fisher is depend- ent on nothing but enough wind to curl the water, -and on a large loch it is very seldom that a dead calm prevails all day, -and can make his arrangements for a day, weeks beforehand whereas the stream- fisher is dependent for a good take on the state of the water and however pleasant and easy it may be for one living near the banks of a good trout stream or river, it is quite another matter to arrange for a days river-fishing, if one is looking forward to a holiday at a date some weeks ahead. Providence may favour the expectant angler with a good day, and the water in order but experience has taught most of us that the good days are in the minority, and that, as is the case with our rapid running streams, -such as many of our northern streams are, -the water is either too large or too small, unless, as previously remarked, you live near at hand, and can catch it at its best. A common belief in regard to loch-fishing is, that the tyro and the experienced angler have nearly the same chance in fishing, -the one from the stern and the other from the bow of the same boat. Of all the absurd beliefs as to loch-fishing, this is one of the most absurd. Try it. Give the tyro either end of the boat he likes give him a cast of ally flies he may fancy, or even a cast similar to those which a crack may be using and if he catches one for every three the other has, he may consider himself very lucky. Of course there are lochs where the fish are not abundant, and a beginner may come across as many as an older fisher but we speak of lochs where there are fish to be caught, and where each has a fair chance. Again, it is said that the boatman has as much to do with catching trout in a loch as the angler. Well, we dont deny that. In an untried loch it is necessary to have the guidance of a good boatman but the same argument holds good as to stream-fishing...

Modern British literature

Author: Ruth Zabriskie Temple

Publisher: Ungar Pub Co

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 510

View: 396

Intercultural Voices in Contemporary British Literature

The Implosion of Empire

Author: L. Sauerberg

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 523

During the last decades of the twentieth century it has become increasingly difficult to consider British literature as 'national' or 'mainstream'. The book investigates contemporary fiction and poetry written in, or relating to, Britain and uncovers a distinct sense of a new and different national and social reality. Tracing literary effects of migration, globalization, and regionalization the book focuses on literary tradition as an inspiration or object of hate and frustration for the exploration and expression of post-Imperial experiences.

Modern British literature

Author: Ruth Zabriskie Temple

Publisher: Frederick Ungar

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 5

View: 530

Vol. 4, supplement, compiled and edited by M. Tucker and R. Stein; v. 5, supplement, compiled and edited by Denis Lane and Rita Stein.