Miyazakiworld

A Life in Art

Author: Susan Napier

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 344

View: 919

The story of filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki's life and work, including his significant impact on Japan and the world A thirtieth†‘century toxic jungle, a bathhouse for tired gods, a red†‘haired fish girl, and a furry woodland spirit—what do these have in common? They all spring from the mind of Hayao Miyazaki, one of the greatest living animators, known worldwide for films such as My Neighbor Totoro, Princess Mononoke, Spirited Away, Howl’s Moving Castle, and The Wind Rises. Japanese culture and animation scholar Susan Napier explores the life and art of this extraordinary Japanese filmmaker to provide a definitive account of his oeuvre. Napier insightfully illuminates the multiple themes crisscrossing his work, from empowered women to environmental nightmares to utopian dreams, creating an unforgettable portrait of a man whose art challenged Hollywood dominance and ushered in a new chapter of global popular culture.

Hayao MiyazakiÕs World Picture

Author: Dani Cavallaro

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 204

View: 128

Hayao Miyazaki has gained worldwide recognition as a leading figure in the history of animation, alongside Walt Disney, Milt Kahl, Tex Avery, Chuck Jones, Yuri Norstein and John Lasseter. In both his films and his writings, Miyazaki invites us to reflect on the unexamined beliefs that govern our lives. His eclectic body of work addresses compelling philosophical and political questions and demands critical attention. This study examines his views on contemporary culture and economics from a broad spectrum of perspectives, from Zen and classical philosophy and Romanticism, to existentialism, critical theory, poststructuralism and psychoanalytic theory.

Mechademia 1

Emerging Worlds of Anime and Manga

Author: Frenchy Lunning

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 184

View: 228

After decades in which American popular culture dominated global media and markets, Japanese popular culture—primarily manga and anime, but also toys, card and video games, and fashion—has exploded into a worldwide phenomenon. From Pokémon and the Power Rangers to Paranoia Agent and Princess Mononoke, Japanese popular culture is consumed by an eager and exponentially increasing audience of youths, teenagers, and adults. Mechademia, a new annual edited by Frenchy Lunning, begins an innovative and fresh conversation among scholars, critics, and fans about the complexity of art forms like Superflat, manga, and anime. The inaugural volume, Mechademia 1 engages the rise of Japanese popular culture through game design, fashion, graphic design, commercial packaging, character creation, and fan culture. Promoting dynamic ways of thinking, along with state-of-the-art graphic design and a wealth of images, this cutting-edge work opens new doors between academia and fandom.The premiere issue features the interactive worlds that anime and manga have created, including the origins of cosplay (the manga and anime costume subculture), Superflat, forgotten images from a founding manga artist, video game interactivity, the nature of anime fandom in America, and the globalization of manga. Contributors: Anne Allison, Duke U; William L. Benzon; Christopher Bolton, Williams College; Vern L. Bullough, California State U, Northridge; Martha Cornog; Patrick Drazen; Marc Hairston; Mari Kotani; Thomas LaMarre; Antonia Levi, Portland State U; Thomas Looser, NYU; Susan Napier, U of Texas, Austin; Michelle Ollie; Timothy Perper; Sara Pocock; Brian Ruh; Takayuki Tatsumi, Keio U, Tokyo; Toshiya Ueno, Wako U, Tokyo; Theresa Winge, U of Northern Iowa; Mark J. P. Wolf, Concordia U; Wendy Siuyi Wong, York U.Frenchy Lunning is professor of liberal arts at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design.

The Anime Movie Guide

Author: Helen McCarthy

Publisher: Overlook Books

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 285

View: 255

The phenomenally popular "Power Rangers", the most mainstream offshoot of "anime", or Japanese animation, is just the tip of the iceberg. There are hundreds of these virtually astonishing films, appealing to people of all ages and tastes. This guide features detailed listings of feature films and direct-to-video features, arranged by title, year of release, and subject, that have been released since 1983. Illustrations throughout.

The Animé Art of Hayao Miyazaki

Author: Dani Cavallaro

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 204

View: 802

"This work considers the visual conventions of Japanese comic books and animated films, Miyazaki's early foray into comic books and animation, the Studio Ghibli era, and the company's development. It analyzes all of Miyazaki's productions between 1984 and 2004, including such hits as My Neighbor Totoro"--Provided by publisher.

Anime Intersections

Tradition and Innovation in Theme and Technique

Author: Dani Cavallaro

Publisher: McFarland Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 209

View: 889

"The main body of the text comprises nine chapters, each of which is a detailed analysis of a production and explores the developments in works such as Ninja Scroll, Perfect Blue, and Howl's Moving Castle. The final chapter examines the impact of the medium within Western contexts"--Provided by publisher.

Spirited Away

Author: Andrew Osmond

Publisher: British Film Institute

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 121

View: 466

Spirited Away, directed by the veteran anime film-maker Hayao Miyazaki, is Japan’s most successful film, and one of the top-grossing ‘foreign language’ films ever released. Set in modern Japan, the film is a wildly imaginative fantasy, at once personal and universal. It tells the story of a listless little girl who stumbles into a magical world where gods relax in a palatial bathhouse; where there are giant babies and hard-working soot sprites, and where a train runs across the sea. Andrew Osmond’s insightful study describes how Miyazaki wrote, storyboarded and directed Spirited Away with a degree of creative control undreamt of in most popular cinema, using the film’s delightful, freewheeling visual ideas to explore issues ranging from personal agency and responsibility to what Miyazaki sees as the lamentable state of modern Japan. Osmond unpacks the film’s visual language, which many Western (and some Japanese) audiences find both beautiful and sometimes bewildering. He traces connections between Spirited Away and Miyazaki’s prior body of work, and provides an account of the film’s production and the creative differences between Miyazaki and his collaborators, arguing that Spirited Away uses the cartoon medium to create a compellingly immersive drawn world.