Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 13

The Magical Next Becomes the Medical Now

Author: James D. Westwood

Publisher: IOS Press

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 638

View: 865

Magical describes conditions that are outside our understanding of cause and effect. Even in modern societies, magic-based explanations are powerful because, given the complexity of the universe, there are so many opportunities to use them. The history of medicine is defined by progress in understanding the human body - from magical explanations to measurable results. To continue medical progress, physicians and scientists must openly question traditional models. For thirteen years, MMVR has been an incubator for technologies that create new medical understanding via the simulation, visualization, and extension of reality. Researchers create imaginary patients because they offer a more reliable and controllable experience to the novice surgeon. With imaging tools, reality is purposefully distorted to reveal to the clinician what the eye alone cannot see. Robotics and intelligence networks allow the healer's sight, hearing, touch, and judgment to be extended across distance, as if by magic. The moments when scientific truth is suddenly revealed after lengthy observation, experimentation, and measurement is the real magic. These moments are not miraculous, however. book.

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 15

In Vivo, in Vitro, in Silico: Designing the Next in Medicine

Author: J.D. Westwood

Publisher: IOS Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 548

View: 336

Our culture is obsessed with design. Sometimes designers can fuse utility and fantasy to make the mundane appear fresh—a cosmetic repackaging of the same old thing. Because of this, medicine—grounded in the unforgiving realities of the scientific method and peer review, and of flesh, blood, and pain—can sometimes confuse “design” with mere “prettifying.” Design solves real problems, however. This collection of papers underwrites the importance of design for the MMVR community, within three different environments: in vivo, in vitro and in silico. in vivo: we design machines to explore our living bodies. Imaging devices, robots, and sensors move constantly inward, operating within smaller dimensions: system, organ, cell, DNA. in vitro: Using test tubes and Petri dishes, we isolate in vivo to better manipulate and measure biological conditions and reactions. in silico: We step out of the controlled in vitro environment and into a virtual reality. The silica mini-worlds of test tubes and Petri dishes are translated into mini-worlds contained within silicon chips. The future of medicine remains within all three environments: in vivo, in vitro, and in silico. Design is what makes these pieces fit together—the biological, the informational, the physical/material—into something new and more useful.

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 17

NextMed : Design For/the Well Being

Author: James D. Westwood

Publisher: IOS Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 477

View: 366

The MMVR17 proceedings collect 108 papers by conference lecture and poster presenters. These papers cover recent developments in biomedical simulation and modeling, visualization and data fusion, haptics, robotics, sensors and other related information-based technologies. Key applications include medical education and surgical training, clinical diagnosis and therapy, physical rehabilitation, psychological assessment, telemedicine and more.

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 14

Accelerating Change in Healthcare : Next Medical Toolkit

Author: James D. Westwood

Publisher: IOS Press

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 600

View: 790

"Machine intelligence will eclipse human intelligence within the next few decades - extrapolating from Moores Law - and our world will enjoy limitless computational power and ubiquitous data networks. Todays iPod devices portend an era when biology and information technology will fuse to create a human experience radically different from our own. Already, our healthcare system now appears on the verge of crisis; accelerating change is part of the problem. Each technological upgrade demands an investment of education and money, and a costly infrastructure more quickly becomes obsolete. Practitioners can be overloaded with complexity: therapeutic options, outcomes data, procedural coding, drug names etc. Furthermore, an aging global population with a growing sense of entitlement demands that each medical breakthrough be immediately available for its benefit: what appears in the morning paper is expected simultaneously in the doctors office. Meanwhile, a third-party payer system generates conflicting priorities for patient care and stockholder returns. The result is a healthcare system stressed by scientific promise, public expectation, economic and regulatory constraints and human limitations. Change is also proving beneficial, of course. Practitioners are empowered by better imaging methods, more precise robotic tools, greater realism in training simulators, and more powerful intelligence networks. The remarkable accomplishments of the IT industry and the Internet are trickling steadily into healthcare. The Medicine Meets Virtual Reality series can readily see the progress of the past fourteen years: more effective healthcare at a lower overall cost, driven by cheaper and better computers."

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality

Global Healthcare Grid

Author: Karen S. Morgan

Publisher: Ios PressInc

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 621

View: 285

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 12

Building a Better You : the Next Tools for Medical Education, Diagnosis, and Care

Author: James D. Westwood

Publisher: IOS Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 428

View: 839

The Medicine Meets Virtual Reality conference is a leading forum for surgical simulation and its supporting technologies, haptics and modeling. Assessment and validation studies of newly developed simulation tools are presented with the aim of enhancing the traditional medical education curriculum. Robotics, data visualization and fusion, networking, displays and augmented reality, are additionally explored at MMVR as tools to improve clinical diagnosis and therapy. The Proceedings offers medical educators, device developers, and clinicians a wide spectrum of research on data-focused technology utilized in a medical context.

Medicine meets virtual reality 2000

envisioning healing: interactive technology and the patient-practitioner dialogue

Author: James D. Westwood

Publisher: Ios Pr Inc

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 402

View: 169

This book provides an innovative international forum for the researchers, developers, and practitioners who are actively expanding the role of electronic technologies in healthcare. The contributions are by pioneers in all aspects of the field: telemedicine, simulation, computer-assisted surgery, haptics, robotics, education, diagnostics, etc. Leading edge developments and current clinical experience are brought together for the purpose of exploring ways to improve medical care. Mental health implications of new electronic technologies are also discussed. This book has a special focus on virtual reality as a means of bringing practitioner and patient closer in the pursuit of healing. Rather than superseding the talents of healthcare professionals, interactive computer-based tools have the ability to enhance the traditional dialogue of care. In addition, these tools can be used to integrate useful qualities of complementary therapies into allopathic medicine. Sight, touch, sound and other senses can be linked and augmented in ways previously unimagined, ultimately to benefit the patient.

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality

Art, Science, Technology: Healthcare (r)evolution

Author: James D. Westwood

Publisher: IOS Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 409

View: 281

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 21

NextMed / MMVR21

Author: J.D. Westwood

Publisher: IOS Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 516

View: 980

This book presents the proceedings of the 21st NextMed/MMVR conference, held in Manhattan Beach, California, in February 2014. These papers describe recent developments in medical simulation, modeling, visualization, imaging, haptics, robotics, sensors, interfaces, and other IT-enabled technologies that benefit healthcare. The wide range of applications includes simulation for medical education and surgical training, information-guided therapies, mental and physical rehabilitation tools, and intelligence networks. Since 1992, Nextmed/MMVR has engaged the problem-solving abilities of scientists, engineers, clinicians, educators, the military, students, and healthcare futurists. Its multidisciplinary participation offers a fresh perspective on how to make patient care and medical education more precise and effective.

Medicine Meets Virtual Reality 16

Parallel, Combinatorial, Convergent : NextMed by Design

Author: James D. Westwood

Publisher: IOS Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 574

View: 446

We humans are tribal, grouping ourselves by a multitude of criteria: physical, intellectual, political, emotional, etc. The Internet and its auxiliary technologies have enabled a novel dimension in tribal behavior during our recent past. This growing connectivity begs the question: will individuals and their communities come together to solve some very urgent global problems? At MMVR, we explore ways to harness information technology to solve healthcare problems - and in the industrialized nations we are making progress. In the developing world however, things are more challenging. Massive urban poverty fuels violence and misery. Will global networking bring a convergence of individual and tribal problem-solving? Recently, a barrel-shaped water carrier that rolls along the ground was presented, improving daily life for many people. Also the One Laptop per Child project is a good example of how the industrialized nations can help the developing countries. They produce durable and simple laptops which are inexpensive to produce. At MMVR, we focus on cutting-edge medical technology, which is generally pretty expensive. While the benefits of innovation trickle downward, from the privileged few to the broader masses, we should expand this trickle into a flood. Can breakthrough applications in stimulation, visualization, robotics, and informatics engender tools as ingeniously as the water carrier or laptop? With some extra creativity, we can design better healthcare for the developing world too.