Meanings of Maple

An Ethnography of Sugaring

Author: Michael Lange

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 231

View: 769

In Meanings of Maple, Michael A. Lange provides a cultural analysis of maple syrup making, known in Vermont as sugaring, to illustrate how maple syrup as both process and product is an aspect of cultural identity. Readers will go deep into a Vermont sugar bush and its web of plastic tubes, mainline valves, and collection tanks. They will visit sugarhouses crammed with gas evaporators and reverse-osmosis machines. And they will witness encounters between sugar makers and the tourists eager to invest Vermont with mythological fantasies of rural simplicity. So much more than a commodity study, Meanings of Maple frames a new approach for evaluating the broader implications of iconic foodways, and it will animate conversations in food studies for years to come.

Consciousness and Meaning

Selected Essays

Author: Brian Loar

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 352

View: 884

One of the most important problems ofmodern philosophy concerns the place of the mind-and, in particular, of consciousness, meaning, and intentionality-in a physical universe. Brian Loar was a major contributor to the discussion of this problem for over four decades. This volume has two parts: one a selection of Loar's essays on the philosophy of language, the other on the philosophy of mind. A common thread in Loar's essays on language is his engagement with the Gricean program of analyzing linguistic representation in terms of mental representation, thus reducing the semantic to the psychological. In the philosophy of mind he was concerned with understanding consciousness and intentionality (mental representation) from the subjective perspective. The concern that unifies Loar's work in mind and language is how to understand subjectivity in a physical universe. He was committed to the reality of phenomenology, qualia, and the subjective perspective; and he found that phenomena like intentionality and consciousness are, in a certain sense, ineliminable and irreducible to objective ones. At the same time he believed that intentionality and consciousness are grounded in the physical. One of his great contributions was to reconcile these two positions by being a conceptual and explanatory anti-reductionist about both consciousness and intentionality but a metaphysical reductionist nonetheless. He had a deep commitment both to physicalism and to the reality and significance of the subjective point of view.

Computing with Maple

Author: Francis Wright

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 552

View: 754

Powerful, flexible, easy to use-small wonder that the use of MAPLE® continues to increase, particularly since the latest releases of MAPLE. The built-in nature of its numerical and graphical facilities gives MAPLE a distinct advantage over traditional programming languages, yet to date, no textbook has used that advantage to introduce programming concepts. Moreover, few books based on MAPLE's latest versions even exist. Computing with MAPLE presents general programming principles using MAPLE as a concrete example of a programming language. The author first addresses the basic MAPLE functions accessible for interactive use then moves to actual programming, discussing all of the programming facilities that MAPLE provides, including control structures, data types, graphics, spreadsheets, text processing, and object oriented programming. Reflecting MAPLE's primary function as a computational tool, the book's emphasis is on mathematical examples, and it includes a full chapter devoted to algebraic programming. Classroom tested since 1995, the material in Computing with MAPLE is particularly appropriate for an intermediate-level introductory course in programming for both mathematics and computing students. It includes numerous exercises and test questions, with MAPLE worksheets, contact information, and supplementary material available on the Internet.

A First Course in Scientific Computing

Symbolic, Graphic, and Numeric Modeling Using Maple, Java, Mathematica, and Fortran90

Author: Rubin H. Landau

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 512

View: 899

This book offers a new approach to introductory scientific computing. It aims to make students comfortable using computers to do science, to provide them with the computational tools and knowledge they need throughout their college careers and into their professional careers, and to show how all the pieces can work together. Rubin Landau introduces the requisite mathematics and computer science in the course of realistic problems, from energy use to the building of skyscrapers to projectile motion with drag. He is attentive to how each discipline uses its own language to describe the same concepts and how computations are concrete instances of the abstract. Landau covers the basics of computation, numerical analysis, and programming from a computational science perspective. The first part of the printed book uses the problem-solving environment Maple as its context, with the same material covered on the accompanying CD as both Maple and Mathematica programs; the second part uses the compiled language Java, with equivalent materials in Fortran90 on the CD; and the final part presents an introduction to LaTeX replete with sample files. Providing the essentials of computing, with practical examples, A First Course in Scientific Computing adheres to the principle that science and engineering students learn computation best while sitting in front of a computer, book in hand, in trial-and-error mode. Not only is it an invaluable learning text and an essential reference for students of mathematics, engineering, physics, and other sciences, but it is also a consummate model for future textbooks in computational science and engineering courses. A broad spectrum of computing tools and examples that can be used throughout an academic career Practical computing aimed at solving realistic problems Both symbolic and numerical computations A multidisciplinary approach: science + math + computer science Maple and Java in the book itself; Mathematica, Fortran90, Maple and Java on the accompanying CD in an interactive workbook format

First Leaves

A Tutorial Introduction to Maple

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: MAPLE (Computer system).

Page: 122

View: 747

First leaves

a tutorial introduction to Maple V

Author: Bruce W. Char

Publisher: Springer Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 253

View: 434

Maple V is an interactive system for symbolic computation providing hundreds of functions for use in the sciences, engineering, and diverse areas of mathematics. It provides powerful facilities for numeric and symbolic calculation and for color graphics. An important feature of Maple V is that nearly all of its mathematical functions are implemented using a high-level user language. It is a natural choice for easily formulating and solving problems that use mathematics at all levels. Engineers have used Maple V to reduce the time that they need to solve problems from hours to just a few minutes. Its availability as a tool for exploring mathematics is also helping to change the approach to mathematics education at major universities.

Maple V programming guide

Author: M. B. Monagan

Publisher: Springer Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 379

View: 713

Maple V Mathematics Programming Guide is the fully updated language and programming reference for Maple V Release 5. It presents a detailed description of Maple V Release 5 - the latest release of the powerful, interactive computer algebra system used worldwide as a tool for problem-solving in mathematics, the sciences, engineering, and education. This manual describes the use of both numeric and symbolic expressions, the data types available, and the programming language statements in Maple. It shows how the system can be extended or customized through user defined routines and gives complete descriptions of the system's user interface and 2D and 3D graphics capabilities.