Mathematics and Physics for Programmers

Author: Danny Kodicek

Publisher: Nelson Education

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 608

View: 992

Annotation Many programmers frequently have limited backgrounds in the mathematics and physics needed for game development or other complex applications. Sooner or later, all programmers run into coding issues that will require an understanding of mathematics or physics concepts like collision detection, 3D vectors, transformations, game theory, or basic calculus. This book provides a simple but thorough grounding in the mathematics and physics topics that programmers need to write these algorithms and programs, using a non-language-specific approach. Applications and examples from game programming are included throughout, and exercise sets follow each chapter for additional practice of the techniques. The CD-ROM provides simulations of the mathematical and physical principles discussed in the book along with the source code.

Beginning Math and Physics for Game Programmers

Author: Wendy Stahler

Publisher: New Riders

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 475

View: 450

A guide to game programming discusses concepts of both mathematics and physics that are related to successful game development.

Mathematics and Physics for Programmers, Second Edition

Author: Kodicek

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 592

View: 298

The casual game market continues to expand, and with the use of Flash growing and the increased popularity of the iPhone and other mobile gaming devices, developers have an exciting new route to market. But many of these budding game programmers find that they're missing the core math and physics skills they need to develop even simple games. MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS FOR PROGRAMMERS, SECOND EDITION teaches beginning game programmers they skills they need to develop causal games. Beginning with the basic aspects of mathematics and physics that are relevant to games, and moving on to more complex topics, the book combines theory and practice and the reader develops a number of games throughout the course of the book. With the concepts and techniques presented in the book, readers should be able to program a number of standard casual game types, including Mario-style platformers, driving simulations, puzzle games, and a simple first-person shooter. They will also gain a basic understanding of 2D and 3D geometry.

Fundamentals of Math and Physics for Game Programmers

Author: Wendy Stahler

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN:

Category: Games

Page: 539

View: 373

Fundamentals of Math and Physics for Game Programmersteaches the fundamental math and physics concepts, principles, and formulas that are crucial for developing successful games. Covers topics such as trigonometry snippets, vector and matrix operations, transformations, momentum and collisions, and 1D/2D/3D motion. Concepts are taught in a step-by-step format in order to improve the level of game development. Includes case studies and hands-on projects allowing students to experience the application of essential concepts. End-or-chapter review exercises are provided for additional content reinforcement

Mathematics for 3D Game Programming and Computer Graphics, Third Edition

Author: Eric Lengyel

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Computer games

Page: 576

View: 471

This updated third edition addresses the mathematical skills that a programmer needs to develop a 3D game engine and computer graphics for professional-level games. MATHEMATICS FOR 3D GAME PROGRAMMING & COMPUTER GRAPHICS, THIRD EDITION is suitable for adv

Essential Mathematics for Games and Interactive Applications

A Programmer's Guide, Second Edition

Author: James M. Van Verth

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 704

View: 316

Essential Mathematics for Games and Interactive Applications, 2nd edition presents the core mathematics necessary for sophisticated 3D graphics and interactive physical simulations. The book begins with linear algebra and matrix multiplication and expands on this foundation to cover such topics as color and lighting, interpolation, animation and basic game physics. Essential Mathematics focuses on the issues of 3D game development important to programmers and includes optimization guidance throughout. The new edition Windows code will now use Visual Studio.NET. There will also be DirectX support provided, along with OpenGL - due to its cross-platform nature. Programmers will find more concrete examples included in this edition, as well as additional information on tuning, optimization and robustness. The book has a companion CD-ROM with exercises and a test bank for the academic secondary market, and for main market: code examples built around a shared code base, including a math library covering all the topics presented in the book, a core vector/matrix math engine, and libraries to support basic 3D rendering and interaction.

Physics Modeling for Game Programmers

Author: David Conger

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 513

View: 684

Through masterful physics modeling, the action in your games can achieve an amazing level of reality. "Physics Modeling for Game Programmers" takes you beyond theories and techniques and shows you how to implement your new skills toward practical applications. You'll cover the basic math concepts that are essential to physics modeling, including Euclidean geometry. Then it's on to motion and collision as you learn how to make the elements in your game move in a realistic way. Wrap things up with a study of hands-on 3D simulation and the physics of land and air vehicles.

Game Design Foundations

Author: Roger Pedersen

Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 384

View: 955

Game Design Foundations, Second Edition covers how to design the game from the important opening sentence, the “One Pager” document, the Executive Summary and Game Proposal, the Character Document to the Game Design Document. The book describes game genres, where game ideas come from, game research, innovation in gaming, important gaming principles such as game mechanics, game balancing, AI, path finding and game tiers. The basics of programming, level designing, and film scriptwriting are explained by example. Each chapter has exercises to hone in on the newly learned designer skills that will display your work as a game designer and your knowledge in the game industry.

Holistic Game Development with Unity

An All-in-One Guide to Implementing Game Mechanics, Art, Design and Programming

Author: Penny de Byl

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 490

View: 621

The independent developer has ascended, and the new business model demands agility. You have to be able to work on all aspects of game creation, and your team's game will publish directly to platforms like Android, iPhone, and Facebook. You'll use Unity, the hottest game engine out there, to do it. In order to earn your place on the elite development team, you must master both sides of the development coin: art and programming. Holistic Game Development with Unity is an authoritative guide to creating games in Unity. Taking you through game design, programming, and art, Penny de Byl uses a holistic approach to equip you with the multidisciplinary skills you need for the independent games industry. With this book, you will master essential digital art and design principles while learning the programming skills necessary to build interactivity into your games. The tutorials will put these skills into action. The companion website offers: source code for completed projects from the book, art assets, instructional videos, a forum, author blog and lesson plans and challenge questions for professors. Examines art and programming in unison-the only one-stop shop for individual developers and small teams looking to tackle both tasks.

A Primer on Scientific Programming with Python

Author: Hans Petter Langtangen

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 922

View: 429

The book serves as a first introduction to computer programming of scientific applications, using the high-level Python language. The exposition is example and problem-oriented, where the applications are taken from mathematics, numerical calculus, statistics, physics, biology and finance. The book teaches "Matlab-style" and procedural programming as well as object-oriented programming. High school mathematics is a required background and it is advantageous to study classical and numerical one-variable calculus in parallel with reading this book. Besides learning how to program computers, the reader will also learn how to solve mathematical problems, arising in various branches of science and engineering, with the aid of numerical methods and programming. By blending programming, mathematics and scientific applications, the book lays a solid foundation for practicing computational science. From the reviews: Langtangen ... does an excellent job of introducing programming as a set of skills in problem solving. He guides the reader into thinking properly about producing program logic and data structures for modeling real-world problems using objects and functions and embracing the object-oriented paradigm. ... Summing Up: Highly recommended. F. H. Wild III, Choice, Vol. 47 (8), April 2010 Those of us who have learned scientific programming in Python ‘on the streets’ could be a little jealous of students who have the opportunity to take a course out of Langtangen’s Primer.” John D. Cook, The Mathematical Association of America, September 2011 This book goes through Python in particular, and programming in general, via tasks that scientists will likely perform. It contains valuable information for students new to scientific computing and would be the perfect bridge between an introduction to programming and an advanced course on numerical methods or computational science. Alex Small, IEEE, CiSE Vol. 14 (2), March /April 2012 “This fourth edition is a wonderful, inclusive textbook that covers pretty much everything one needs to know to go from zero to fairly sophisticated scientific programming in Python...” Joan Horvath, Computing Reviews, March 2015