Mathematical Analysis II

Author: V. A. Zorich

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 720

View: 650

This second English edition of a very popular two-volume work presents a thorough first course in analysis, leading from real numbers to such advanced topics as differential forms on manifolds; asymptotic methods; Fourier, Laplace, and Legendre transforms; elliptic functions; and distributions. Especially notable in this course are the clearly expressed orientation toward the natural sciences and the informal exploration of the essence and the roots of the basic concepts and theorems of calculus. Clarity of exposition is matched by a wealth of instructive exercises, problems, and fresh applications to areas seldom touched on in textbooks on real analysis. The main difference between the second and first English editions is the addition of a series of appendices to each volume. There are six of them in the first volume and five in the second. The subjects of these appendices are diverse. They are meant to be useful to both students (in mathematics and physics) and teachers, who may be motivated by different goals. Some of the appendices are surveys, both prospective and retrospective. The final survey establishes important conceptual connections between analysis and other parts of mathematics. This second volume presents classical analysis in its current form as part of a unified mathematics. It shows how analysis interacts with other modern fields of mathematics such as algebra, differential geometry, differential equations, complex analysis, and functional analysis. This book provides a firm foundation for advanced work in any of these directions.

Mathematical Analysis II

Author: Vladimir A. Zorich

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 688

View: 401

An entire generation of mathematicians has grown up during the time - tween the appearance of the ?rst edition of this textbook and the publication of the fourth edition, a translation of which is before you. The book is fam- iar to many people, who either attended the lectures on which it is based or studied out of it, and who now teach others in universities all over the world. I am glad that it has become accessible to English-speaking readers. This textbook consists of two parts. It is aimed primarily at university students and teachers specializing in mathematics and natural sciences, and at all those who wish to see both the rigorous mathematical theory and examplesofitse?ectiveuseinthesolutionofrealproblemsofnaturalscience. The textbook exposes classical analysis as it is today, as an integral part of Mathematics in its interrelations with other modern mathematical courses such as algebra, di?erential geometry, di?erential equations, complex and functional analysis.

Mathematical Analysis II

Author: Claudio Canuto

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 543

View: 637

The purpose of this textbook is to present an array of topics in Calculus, and conceptually follow our previous effort Mathematical Analysis I.The present material is partly found, in fact, in the syllabus of the typical second lecture course in Calculus as offered in most Italian universities. While the subject matter known as `Calculus 1' is more or less standard, and concerns real functions of real variables, the topics of a course on `Calculus 2'can vary a lot, resulting in a bigger flexibility. For these reasons the Authors tried to cover a wide range of subjects, not forgetting that the number of credits the current programme specifications confers to a second Calculus course is not comparable to the amount of content gathered here. The reminders disseminated in the text make the chapters more independent from one another, allowing the reader to jump back and forth, and thus enhancing the versatility of the book. On the website: http://calvino.polito.it/canuto-tabacco/analisi 2, the interested reader may find the rigorous explanation of the results that are merely stated without proof in the book, together with useful additional material. The Authors have completely omitted the proofs whose technical aspects prevail over the fundamental notions and ideas. The large number of exercises gathered according to the main topics at the end of each chapter should help the student put his improvements to the test. The solution to all exercises is provided, and very often the procedure for solving is outlined.

Problems in Mathematical Analysis

Author: Biler

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 244

View: 211

Chapter 1 poses 134 problems concerning real and complex numbers, chapter 2 poses 123 problems concerning sequences, and so it goes, until in chapter 9 one encounters 201 problems concerning functional analysis. The remainder of the book is given over to the presentation of hints, answers or referen

Mathematical Analysis I

Author: V. A. Zorich

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 616

View: 350

This second edition of a very popular two-volume work presents a thorough first course in analysis, leading from real numbers to such advanced topics as differential forms on manifolds; asymptotic methods; Fourier, Laplace, and Legendre transforms; elliptic functions; and distributions. Especially notable in this course are the clearly expressed orientation toward the natural sciences and the informal exploration of the essence and the roots of the basic concepts and theorems of calculus. Clarity of exposition is matched by a wealth of instructive exercises, problems, and fresh applications to areas seldom touched on in textbooks on real analysis. The main difference between the second and first editions is the addition of a series of appendices to each volume. There are six of them in the first volume and five in the second. The subjects of these appendices are diverse. They are meant to be useful to both students (in mathematics and physics) and teachers, who may be motivated by different goals. Some of the appendices are surveys, both prospective and retrospective. The final survey establishes important conceptual connections between analysis and other parts of mathematics. The first volume constitutes a complete course in one-variable calculus along with the multivariable differential calculus elucidated in an up-to-date, clear manner, with a pleasant geometric and natural sciences flavor.

Analysis II

Third Edition

Author: Terence Tao

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 220

View: 634

This is part two of a two-volume book on real analysis and is intended for senior undergraduate students of mathematics who have already been exposed to calculus. The emphasis is on rigour and foundations of analysis. Beginning with the construction of the number systems and set theory, the book discusses the basics of analysis (limits, series, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration), through to power series, several variable calculus and Fourier analysis, and then finally the Lebesgue integral. These are almost entirely set in the concrete setting of the real line and Euclidean spaces, although there is some material on abstract metric and topological spaces. The book also has appendices on mathematical logic and the decimal system. The entire text (omitting some less central topics) can be taught in two quarters of 25–30 lectures each. The course material is deeply intertwined with the exercises, as it is intended that the student actively learn the material (and practice thinking and writing rigorously) by proving several of the key results in the theory.

Analysis II.

Author: Serge Lang

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 476

View: 339

Analysis II

Differential and Integral Calculus, Fourier Series, Holomorphic Functions

Author: Roger Godement

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 448

View: 657

Functions in R and C, including the theory of Fourier series, Fourier integrals and part of that of holomorphic functions, form the focal topic of these two volumes. Based on a course given by the author to large audiences at Paris VII University for many years, the exposition proceeds somewhat nonlinearly, blending rigorous mathematics skilfully with didactical and historical considerations. It sets out to illustrate the variety of possible approaches to the main results, in order to initiate the reader to methods, the underlying reasoning, and fundamental ideas. It is suitable for both teaching and self-study. In his familiar, personal style, the author emphasizes ideas over calculations and, avoiding the condensed style frequently found in textbooks, explains these ideas without parsimony of words. The French edition in four volumes, published from 1998, has met with resounding success: the first two volumes are now available in English.