Maps, Myths, and Men

The Story of the Vinland Map

Author: Kirsten A. Seaver

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 480

View: 630

The "Vínland Map" first surfaced on the antiquarian market in 1957 and the map's authenticity has been hotly debated ever since—in controversies ranging from the anomalous composition of the ink and the map's lack of provenance to a plethora of historical and cartographical riddles. Maps, Myths, and Men is the first work to address the full range of this debate. Focusing closely on what the map in fact shows, the book contains a critique of the 1965 work The Vinland Map and the Tartar Relation; scrutinizes the marketing strategies used in 1957; and covers many aspects of the map that demonstrate it is a modern fake, such as literary evidence and several scientific ink analyses performed between 1967 and 2002. The author explains a number of the riddles and provides evidence for both the identity of the mapmaker and the source of the parchment used, and she applies current knowledge of medieval Norse culture and exploration to counter widespread misinformation about Norse voyages to North America and about the Norse world picture.

Megaliths, Myths and Men

An Introduction to Astro-Archaeology

Author: Peter Lancaster Brown

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 324

View: 885

Fascinating study of early astronomical knowledge through the interpretation of such ancient monuments as Stonehenge, Carnac, other megalithic sites. Over 140 photos, maps, illustrations. "Fascinating."? Publishers Weekly.

Maps for Men

A Guide for Fathers and Sons and Family Businesses

Author: Edgell Franklin Pyles, PhD

Publisher: WestBow Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 205

MAPS for Men is a must-have resource for any and every family business. Dave Ramsey, Nationally syndicated radio show host New York Times best-selling author MAPS for Men is a wonderful book full of superb insight and information. Paul Schorr, III, Past President, Chief Executives Organization I read MAPS for Men today, I should say that I devoured it very interesting and helpful model for all of life. Paul Schorr, IV, (Chip) Founder & Chairman, Augusta Columbia Capital MAPS for Men is a gift to all fathers and sons. James (Jay) E. Hughes, Jr., Author: Family Wealth: Keeping It in the Family MAPS for Men is one of the most comprehensive guides to families in business that I have ever seen. Charles S. Luck, IV, CEO, Luck Companies Founder, InnerWill The transition of wealth concepts described in MAPS are immensely dynamic, relevant, and applicable!! It is a must read for all entrepreneurs! Cordia Harrington, Founder & CEO, The Tennessee Bun Company What a wonderful piece of work. I found each chapter and the whole book incredibly meaningful. Dennis Jaffe, PhD, Author: Working With the Ones You Love: Creating A Successful Family Business. Stewardship in Your Family Enterprise Past President, Association of Humanistic Psychology The guidelines in MAPS will bear fruit for many years and generations to come. David Hardie, Founder and CEO, Hallador Management, LLC Edgell and Thomas have created a book that will impact families for generations. Dennis Passis, President, Family Wealth Library MAPS is truly a masterpiece! Jim Chaffin, President, Chaffin Light Management Company Past Chairman, Urban Land Institute Past Member, Board of Managers, University of Virginia If you are a woman who wants to understand men better, MAPS is all you need to know! Morgan Wandell, Head of Drama Series, Amazon Studios

The Northmen's Fury

A History of the Viking World

Author: Philip Parker

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 916

The Northmen’s Fury tells the Viking story, from the first pinprick raids of the eighth century to the great armies that left their Scandinavian homelands to conquer larger parts of France, Britain and Ireland. It recounts the epic voyages that took them across the Atlantic to the icy fjords of Greenland and to North America over four centuries before Columbus and east to the great rivers of Russia and the riches of the Byzantine empire. One summer’s day in 793, death arrived from the sea. The raiders who sacked the island monastery of Lindisfarne were the first Vikings, sea-borne attackers who brought two centuries of terror to northern Europe. Before long the sight of their dragon-prowed longships and the very name of Viking gave rise to fear and dread, so much so that monks were reputed to pray each night for delivery from ‘the Northmen’s Fury’. Yet for all their reputation as bloodthirsty warriors, the Vikings possessed a sophisticated culture that produced art of great beauty, literature of abiding power and kingdoms of surprising endurance. The Northmen’s Fury describes how and why a region at the edge of Europe came to dominate and to terrorise much of the rest of the continent for nearly three centuries and how, in the end, the coming of Christianity and the growing power of kings tempered the Viking ferocity and stemmed the tide of raids. It relates the astonishing achievement of the Vikings in forging far-flung empires whose sinews were the sea and whose arteries were not roads but maritime trading routes. The blood of the Vikings runs in millions of veins in Europe and the Americas and the tale of their conquests, explorations and achievements continues to inspire people around the world.

The Mysteries of the Marco Polo Maps

Author: Benjamin B. Olshin

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 174

View: 684

Concerns a collection of maps and associated documents claimed to be from Marco Polo's time or that of his daughters (as many of the maps have the name or one or another of the three daughters on them). Discusses provenance, authenticity, and history of the documents, known to scholars as "the Marco Polo Maps" since 1948, here discussed fully for the first time.

The Franciscan Invention of the New World

Author: Julia McClure

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 229

View: 350

This book examines the story of the ‘discovery of America’ through the prism of the history of the Franciscans, a socio-religious movement with a unique doctrine of voluntary poverty. The Franciscans rapidly developed global dimensions, but their often paradoxical relationships with poverty and power offer an alternate account of global history. Through this lens, Julia McClure offers a deeper history of colonialism, not only by extending its chronology, but also by exploring the powerful role of ambivalence in the emergence of colonial regimes. Other topics discussed include the legal history of property, the complexity and politics of global knowledge networks, the early (and neglected) history of the Near Atlantic, and the transatlantic inquisition, mysticism, apocalypticism, and religious imaginations of place.

Beardmore

The Viking Hoax That Rewrote History

Author: Douglas Hunter

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 975

In 1936, long before the discovery of the Viking settlement at L'Anse aux Meadows, the Royal Ontario Museum made a sensational acquisition: the contents of a Viking grave that prospector Eddy Dodd said he had found on his mining claim east of Lake Nipigon. The relics remained on display for two decades, challenging understandings of when and where Europeans first reached the Americas. In 1956 the discovery was exposed as an unquestionable hoax, tarnishing the reputation of the museum director, Charles Trick Currelly, who had acquired the relics and insisted on their authenticity. Drawing on an array of archival sources, Douglas Hunter reconstructs the notorious hoax and its many players. Beardmore unfolds like a detective story as the author sifts through the voluminous evidence and follows the efforts of two unlikely debunkers, high-school teacher Teddy Elliott and government geologist T.L. Tanton, who find themselves up against Currelly and his scholarly allies. Along the way, the controversy draws in a who’s who of international figures in archaeology, Scandinavian studies, and the museum world, including anthropologist Edmund Carpenter, whose mid-1950s crusade against the find’s authenticity finally convinced scholars and curators that the grave was a fraud. Shedding light on museum practices and the state of the historical and archaeological professions in the mid-twentieth century, Beardmore offers an unparalleled view inside a major museum scandal to show how power can be exercised across professional networks and hamper efforts to arrive at the truth.

Lost Maps of the Caliphs

Drawing the World in Eleventh-Century Cairo

Author: Yossef Rapoport

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 198

About a millennium ago, in Cairo, an unknown author completed a large and richly illustrated book. In the course of thirty-five chapters, this book guided the reader on a journey from the outermost cosmos and planets to Earth and its lands, islands, features, and inhabitants. This treatise, known as The Book of Curiosities, was unknown to modern scholars until a remarkable manuscript copy surfaced in 2000. Lost Maps of the Caliphs provides the first general overview of The Book of Curiosities and the unique insight it offers into medieval Islamic thought. Opening with an account of the remarkable discovery of the manuscript and its purchase by the Bodleian Library, the authors use The Book of Curiosities to re-evaluate the development of astrology, geography, and cartography in the first four centuries of Islam. Their account assesses the transmission of Late Antique geography to the Islamic world, unearths the logic behind abstract maritime diagrams, and considers the palaces and walls that dominate medieval Islamic plans of towns and ports. Early astronomical maps and drawings demonstrate the medieval understanding of the structure of the cosmos and illustrate the pervasive assumption that almost any visible celestial event had an effect upon life on Earth. Lost Maps of the Caliphs also reconsiders the history of global communication networks at the turn of the previous millennium. It shows the Fatimid Empire, and its capital Cairo, as a global maritime power, with tentacles spanning from the eastern Mediterranean to the Indus Valley and the East African coast. As Lost Maps of the Caliphs makes clear, not only is The Book of Curiosities one of the greatest achievements of medieval mapmaking, it is also a remarkable contribution to the story of Islamic civilization that opens an unexpected window to the medieval Islamic view of the world.

The Mappae Mundi of Medieval Iceland

Author: Dale Kedwards

Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 256

View: 486

Front cover -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Acknowledgements -- Abbreviations -- Introduction -- Chapter 1 The Icelandic Hemispherical World Maps -- Chapter 2 The Icelandic Zonal Map -- Chapter 3 The Two Maps from Viðey -- Chapter 4 Iceland in Europe -- Chapter 5 Forty Icelandic Priests and a Map of the World -- Conclusion -- Map Texts and Translations -- The Icelandic Hemispherical World Maps -- The Icelandic Zonal Map -- The Larger Viðey Map -- The Smaller Viðey Map -- Bibliography -- Index -- Studies in Old Norse Literature.

The World Map, 1300–1492

The Persistence of Tradition and Transformation

Author: Evelyn Edson

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 312

View: 538

This engaging and informative study reveals how the ingenuity, creativity, and adaptability of these craftsmen helped pave the way for an age of discovery.

Norse America

The Story of a Founding Myth

Author: Gordon Campbell

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 458

The story of the Vikings in North America as both fact and fiction, from the westward expansion of the Norse across the North Atlantic in the tenth and eleventh centuries to the myths and fabrications about their presence there that have developed in recent centuries. Tracking the saga of the Norse across the North Atlantic to America, Norse America sets the record straight about the idea that the Vikings 'discovered' America. The journey described is a continuum, with evidence-based history and archaeology at one end, and fake history and outright fraud at the other. In between there lies a huge expanse of uncertainty: sagas that may contain shards of truth, characters that may be partly historical, real archaeology that may be interpreted through the fictions of saga, and fragmentary evidence open to responsible and irresponsible interpretation. Norse America is a book that tells two stories. The first is the westward expansion of the Norse across the North Atlantic in the tenth and eleventh centuries, ending (but not culminating) in a fleeting and ill-documented presence on the shores of the North American mainland. The second is the appropriation and enhancement of the westward narrative by Canadians and Americans who want America to have had white North European origins, who therefore want the Vikings to have 'discovered' America, and who in the advancement of that thesis have been willing to twist and manufacture evidence in support of claims grounded in an ideology of racial superiority.

The Fourth Part of the World

The Epic Story of History's Greatest Map

Author: Toby Lester

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 782

The Waldseemller Map of 1507 introduced an astonishing collection of cartological firsts. It was the first map to show the New World as a separate continent, alongside Europe, Africa and Asia - and the first on which the word 'America' appears. It was the first map to suggest the existence of the Pacific. It was, in short, the first map to depict the whole world as we know it today. Beautiful, fascinating and revealing, it arrived on the scene as Europeans were moving out of the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance, thanks to a tiny group of European mapmakers who pieced together ideas going back to the ancients and through Marco Polo to Vespucci. In The Fourth Part of the World, Toby Lester charts the amazing and colourful history of this map, whose profound influence has been neglected for centuries and which changed the world-view of all humankind.

Stewart Parker

A Life

Author: Marilynn Richtarik

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 448

View: 204

Born in Belfast during World War II, raised in a working-class Protestant family, and educated on scholarship at Queen's University, writer Stewart Parker's story is in many ways the story of his generation. Other aspects of his personal history, though, such as the amputation of his left leg at age 19, helped to create an extraordinarily perceptive observer and commentator. Steeped in American popular culture as a child and young adult, he spent five years teaching in the United States before returning to Belfast in August 1969, the same week British troops responded to sectarian disturbances there. Parker had developed a sense of writing as a form of political action in the highly charged atmosphere of the US in the late 1960s, which he applied in many and varied capacities throughout the worst years of the Troubles to express his own socialist and secular vision of Northern Irish potential. As a young aspiring poet and novelist, he supported himself with free-lance work that brought him into contact with institutions ranging from BBC Northern Ireland to the Irish Times (for which he wrote personal columns and the music review feature High Pop) and from the Queen's University Extramural Department to Long Kesh internment camp (where his creative writing students included Gerry Adams). It is as a playwright, however, that Parker earned a permanent spot in the literary canon with drama that encapsulates his experience of Northern Ireland in the 1970s. Marilynn Richtarik's Stewart Parker: A Life illuminates the genesis, development, and meaning of such classic plays as Spokesong, Northern Star, and Pentecost - works that continue to shed light on the North's past, present, and future - in the context of Parker's life and times. Meticulously researched and engagingly written, this critical biography rewards general readers and specialists alike.

Finding Vinland: Unearthing Evidence for Viking Presence in North America

Author: Alexandra Gross

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 972

One thousand years ago, Norse Explorer Leif Erikson stepped off a ship and onto an unknown land, becoming the first known European to set foot on North American soil. This discovery led to future Viking expeditions from Greenland to Atlantic Canada, potentially lasting several centuries. Though the 13th century Icelandic sagas tell tales of these exploits, corroborating archaeological evidence was not discovered until the site of L’Anse aux Meadows was excavated in the year 1961. In the half-century following this groundbreaking discovery, our understanding of the history of North America has shifted. Further discoveries have been made, but many more remain mysteries waiting to be discovered. Who were the Vikings? Why did they continue to return to North America? Where is the elusive settlement of Hóp? What do these recent discoveries mean for the way we tell Canada’s history? We explore the answers to these questions and more in Finding Vinland: Unearthing Evidence for Viking Presence in North America.

The Phantom Atlas

The Greatest Myths, Lies and Blunders on Maps

Author: Edward Brooke-Hitching

Publisher: Chronicle Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 602

Discover the mysteries within ancient maps — Where exploration and mythology meet This richly illustrated book collects and explores the colorful histories behind a striking range of real antique maps that are all in some way a little too good to be true. Mysteries within ancient maps: The Phantom Atlas is a guide to the world not as it is, but as it was imagined to be. It's a world of ghost islands, invisible mountain ranges, mythical civilizations, ship-wrecking beasts, and other fictitious features introduced on maps and atlases through mistakes, misunderstanding, fantasies, and outright lies. Where exploration and mythology meet: Author Edward Brooke-Hitching is a map collector, author, writer for the popular BBC Television program QI and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. He lives in a dusty heap of old maps and books in London investigating the places where exploration and mythology meet. Cartography’s greatest phantoms: The Phantom Atlas uses gorgeous atlas images as springboards for tales of deranged buccaneers, seafaring monks, heroes, swindlers, and other amazing stories behind cartography's greatest phantoms. If you are a fan of this popular genre and a reader of books such as Prisoners of Geography, Atlas of Ancient Rome, Atlas Obscura, What If, Book of General Ignorance, or Thing Explainer, your will love The Phantom Atlas

Hoax Springs Eternal

Author: Peter A. Hancock

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 276

View: 913

This book examines and extrapolates from famous historical case studies to illustrate principles of cognitive deception and how to avoid being deceived.

Map Men

Transnational Lives and Deaths of Geographers in the Making of East Central Europe

Author: Steven Seegel

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 320

View: 839

More than just colorful clickbait or pragmatic city grids, maps are often deeply emotional tales: of political projects gone wrong, budding relationships that failed, and countries that vanished. In Map Men, Steven Seegel takes us through some of these historical dramas with a detailed look at the maps that made and unmade the world of East Central Europe through a long continuum of world war and revolution. As a collective biography of five prominent geographers between 1870 and 1950—Albrecht Penck, Eugeniusz Romer, Stepan Rudnyts’kyi, Isaiah Bowman, and Count Pál Teleki—Map Men reexamines the deep emotions, textures of friendship, and multigenerational sagas behind these influential maps. Taking us deep into cartographical archives, Seegel re-creates the public and private worlds of these five mapmakers, who interacted with and influenced one another even as they played key roles in defining and redefining borders, territories, nations—and, ultimately, the interconnection of the world through two world wars. Throughout, he examines the transnational nature of these processes and addresses weighty questions about the causes and consequences of the world wars, the rise of Nazism and Stalinism, and the reasons East Central Europe became the fault line of these world-changing developments. At a time when East Central Europe has surged back into geopolitical consciousness, Map Men offers a timely and important look at the historical origins of how the region was defined—and the key people who helped define it.

The Forensic Historian

Using Science to Reexamine the Past

Author: Robert C Williams

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 440

Modern forensic science has significantly affected historical debate over some well-known past crimes or mysteries, utilizing modern DNA, nuclear, and chemical analyses to reexamine the past. This book takes an in-depth look at 20 significant cases where investigators have applied new forensic techniques to confirm, dispute, or revise accepted historical accounts. Among the cases included are the murder of King Tut, the validity of the Vinland Map, the authenticity of the Hitler diaries, Joan of Arc's ashes, the bones of Anastasia, arsenic and the death of Napoleon, and the dating of the Shroud of Turin, plus 13 more.

Fashioning History

Current Practices and Principles

Author: R. Berkhofer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 207

This book offers historians and aspiring historians a learned, absorbing, and comprehensive overview of current fashions of method, interpretation, and meaning in the context of postmodernism that has washed over the historical profession in the last two decades.