Manners for Schoolboys

Author: J. Robinson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 112

View: 683

"Think not that you have the right to be idle because you are young." "Of all things, beware of sullenness, melancholy, and ill-humoured silence." "Particularly avoid belching, biting, or cutting your nails, rubbing your teeth and picking your nose and ears in company." "Boys will be boys," the saying goes--but, as this intriguing manual maintains, there is always room for improvement. First published in 1829, it offers forthright advice to young gentlemen in all situations, from encouraging family harmony ("On no account quarrel with your brothers and sisters") to good table manners and conduct at school. Packed with frank and funny observations on boys at work and play, it shows how to navigate the twin perils of "sheepish bashfulness and obtrusive boldness," and hold your own in company with confidence and style. Timeless tips on tidiness, behavior and self-knowledge combine with the social etiquette of two centuries ago in this entertaining and perceptive guide. Manners for Schoolboys, the latest in the British Library's series of vintage reprints, will make an entertaining and amusing read for boys and men whose manners are less than impeccable--as well as anyone who has to be around them.

Manners and Customs of the Modern Egyptians

Author: Edward W. Lane

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 586

View: 807

A pioneering work of cultural anthropology, E.W. Lane's study of Egyptian society has not been out of print since it was first issued in 1836. Immersing himself in Egyptian culture, Lane learned the Arabic language and adopted the Arab way of life. Written before the forces of innovation transformed Egypt, Manners & Customs of the Modern Egyptians is recognized for its wide-ranging scope of detail on daily life topics such as the nature of Islamic laws and its relation to government, birth and marriage customs, death and funeral rites, music and dancing, and the world of magic and alchemy. This distinctive work retains its power to charm and fascinate contemporary readers. EDWARD WILLIAM LANE (1801-1876) was a British translator, lexicographer, and Orientalist. Instead of studying at college as a young man, Lane moved to London with his brother to study engraving, at which time he also began to study Arabic. When his health began failing, he moved to Egypt for a change of atmosphere and to continue his studies. While in Egypt, Lane began to study ancient Egypt, but soon became more entranced by modern customs and society. He relied on Egyptian men to help him gather information, especially on the topic of Egyptian women, on which he wrote many books. Lane also translated One Thousand and One Nights, though his greatest work remains The Arabic-English Lexicon.

Intellectual Manhood

University, Self, and Society in the Antebellum South

Author: Timothy J. Williams

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 302

View: 725

In this in-depth and detailed history, Timothy J. Williams reveals that antebellum southern higher education did more than train future secessionists and proslavery ideologues. It also fostered a growing world of intellectualism flexible enough to marry the era's middle-class value system to the honor-bound worldview of the southern gentry. By focusing on the students' perspective and drawing from a rich trove of their letters, diaries, essays, speeches, and memoirs, Williams narrates the under examined story of education and manhood at the University of North Carolina, the nation's first public university. Every aspect of student life is considered, from the formal classroom and the vibrant curriculum of private literary societies to students' personal relationships with each other, their families, young women, and college slaves. In each of these areas, Williams sheds new light on the cultural and intellectual history of young southern men, and in the process dispels commonly held misunderstandings of southern history. Williams's fresh perspective reveals that students of this era produced a distinctly southern form of intellectual masculinity and maturity that laid the foundation for the formulation of the post–Civil War South.

Sorry! The English and Their Manners

Author: Henry Hitchings

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 724

Most of us know a bit about what passes for good manners - holding doors open, sending thank-you notes, no elbows on the table. We certainly know bad manners when we see them. But where has this patchwork of beliefs and behaviours come from? How did manners develop? How do they change? And why do they matter so much to us? In examining our manners, Henry Hitchings delves into the English character and investigates our notions of Englishness. Sorry! presents an amusing, illuminating and quirky audit of English manners. From basic table manners to appropriate sexual conduct, via hospitality, chivalry, faux pas and online etiquette, Hitchings traces the history of our country's customs and courtesies. Putting under the microscope some of our most astute observers of humanity, including Jane Austen and Samuel Pepys, he uses their lives and writings to pry open the often downright peculiar secrets of the English character. Hitchings' blend of history, anthropology and personal journey helps us understand our bizarre and contested cultural baggage - and ourselves.

Outwitting History

The Amazing Adventures of a Man Who Rescued a Million Yiddish Books

Author: Aaron Lansky

Publisher: Algonquin Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 328

View: 865

This true story of a quest to save Jewish literature is “a detective story, a profound history lesson, and a poignant evocation of a bygone world” (The Boston Globe). In 1980 an entire body of Jewish literature—the physical remnant of Yiddish culture—was on the verge of extinction. Precious volumes that had survived Hitler and Stalin were being passed down from older generations of immigrants to their non-Yiddish-speaking children, only to be discarded or destroyed. So Aaron Lansky, a twenty-three-year-old graduate student, issued a worldwide appeal for unwanted Yiddish works. Lansky’s passion led him to travel from house to house collecting the books—and the stories of these Jewish refugees and the vibrant intellectual world they inhabited. He and a team of volunteers salvaged books from dusty attics, crumbling basements, demolition sites, and dumpsters. When they began, scholars thought that fewer than seventy thousand Yiddish books existed. In fact, Lansky’s project would go on to save over 1.5 million volumes, from famous writers like Sholem Aleichem and I. B. Singer to one-of-a-kind Soviet prints. This true account of his journey is both “extraordinary” (The Boston Globe) and “entertaining” (Los Angeles Times). “Lansky charmingly describes his adventures as president and founder of the National Yiddish Book Center, which now has new headquarters at Hampshire College in Amherst, Mass. To Lansky, Yiddish literature represented an important piece of Jewish cultural history, a link to the past and a memory of a generation lost to the Holocaust. Lansky’s account of salvaging books is both hilarious and moving, filled with Jewish humor, conversations with elderly Jewish immigrants for whom the books evoke memories of a faraway past, stories of desperate midnight rescues from rain-soaked dumpsters, and touching accounts of Lansky’s trips to what were once thriving Jewish communities in Europe. The book is a testimony to his love of Judaism and literature and his desire to make a difference in the world.” —Publishers Weekly