The Mammals of Virginia

Author: John Wendell Bailey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 434

View: 972

An Account Of The Furred Animals Of Land And Sea Known To Exist In This Commonwealth, With A List Of Fossil Mammals From Virginia.

The Mammals of Virginia

Author: Donald W. Linzey

Publisher: University of Tennessee Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 459

View: 606

In this handsome volume, Donald W. Linzey offers a comprehensive review of the state of knowledge concerning the mammals of Virginia and the literature about them that has emerged over the past four hundred years. The book opens with a historical account of mammal investigations in Virginia and a summary of the natural regions of the Commonwealth. Most of the book consists of systematic summaries of the zoology and ecology of each species of mammal that occurs, or recently occurred, in Virginia. Each account describes the species with notes on its distribution, habitat affiliation, behavior, diet, reproduction and development, longevity, parasitology, and selected other topics that vary among the species, as well as a list of locations of museum specimens. A color photograph and line drawing of the skull and mandible from standard perspectives is provided for each species. Among the appendixes is a review of he mammalian fauna of Virginia during the past Ice Age. A substantial reference section identifies more than 2,700 published sources of information about Virginia's mammals. The Mammals of Virginia is a work of massive scope that makes a major contribution to the study of natural history in the Commonwealth.

The Mammals of Virginia

An Account of the Furred Animals of Land and Sea Know to Exist in this Commonwealth, with a List of Fossil Mammals from Virginia

Author: John Wendell Bailey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Mammals

Page: 416

View: 917

The Mammals of Virginia

An Account of the Furred Animals of Land and Sea [...] with a List of Fossil Mammals from Virginia

Author: John Wendell Bailey

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 416

View: 860

The Use of Highway Underpasses by Large Mammals in Virginia and Factors Influencing Their Effectiveness

Author: Bridget M. Donaldson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Bears

Page: 34

View: 577

The rapid increase in animal-vehicle collisions on U.S. roadways is a growing concern in terms of human safety, property damage and injury costs, and viability of wildlife populations. Wildlife crossing structures are gaining national recognition by transportation agencies as effective measures to reduce animal-vehicle collisions and connect wildlife habitats across transportation corridors. In Virginia, white-tailed deer and black bear pose the highest risk. This 1-year study was conducted to monitor various underpass structures in Virginia to determine the structural and location attributes that make a crossing successful in terms of use by large mammals. The underpasses, most of which were not specifically designed as wildlife crossings, consist of box culverts and bridges of varying sizes. Remote cameras installed at seven underpass sites in Virginia have recorded more than 2,700 wildlife photographs and documented 1,107 white-tailed deer crossings in the most heavily used structures. Underpasses with a minimum height of 12 ft were successful at facilitating deer passage. Such structures were also heavily used by a variety of wildlife species, including coyote, red fox, raccoon, groundhog, and opossum. Structures with drainages that mimic natural waterways can encourage use by a diversity of terrestrial, semi-aquatic, and aquatic species. This report provides guidance in choosing cost-effective underpass design and location features that are necessary to consider to increase motorist safety and habitat connectivity. The findings also demonstrate that if only a minimal number of deer-vehicle collisions is prevented by an effective underpass, the savings in property damage alone can outweigh the construction costs of the structure

Reproduction in Mammals

The Female Perspective

Author: Virginia Hayssen

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 490

"Newborn mammals can weigh as little as a dime or as much as a motorcycle. Some receive milk for only a few days, whereas others nurse for years. Humans typically have only one baby at a time following nine months of pregnancy, but other mammals have 20 or more young after only a few weeks in utero. What causes this incredible reproductive diversity? Reproduction in Mammals is a fascinating examination of the diverse reproductive strategies of a broad spectrum of mammals and the ways in which natural selection has influenced that diversity. While accounts of reproduction in individual taxa abound, this unique book's comprehensive coverage gathers stories from many taxa into a single, cohesive perspective that centers on the reproductive lives of females. The authors shed light on intriguing questions such as: Do bigger moms have bigger babies? Do primates have longer pregnancies than other groups? Do aquatic animals have particular patterns? Do carnivores like lions often produce larger litters than prey species? The book opens with the authors' definition of what constitutes a female perspective and an examination of the evolution of reproduction in mammals. It then outlines the individual female: her genetics, anatomy, and physiology. From this nuanced basis, the text progresses to mirror the female reproductive cycle and includes her interactions with males and offspring. The final section contextualizes the reproductive cycle within the rest of the world--both abiotic and biotic environments. To close, the authors include dedicated chapters on human concerns: conservation and women as mammals. Readers will come away from this thought-provoking book with an understanding not only of how reproduction fits into the lives of female mammals but also of how biology has affected the enormously diverse reproductive patterns of the phenotypes we observe today."-- Provided by publisher.

The Marine Mammals of Virginia

With Notes on Identification and Natural History

Author: Robert A. Blaylock

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Marine mammals

Page: 34

View: 447

"To aid citizens in identification, this guide describes the natural history of marine mammals. In addition to whales, dolphins, and porpoises, the harbor seal and the manatee are included here. The guide is organized by taxonomic orders and families; within a subfamily, species are listed by their frequency of appearance in Virginia waters. Many species are illustrated. Space limits descriptions of the species' habitats and distributions to the western North Atlantic"--National Sea Grant Library publication website.

Mammals of the Eastern United States

Author: John O. Whitaker

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 583

View: 106

In Their Definitive Work on eastern mammals, John O. Whitaker, Jr., and William J. Hamilton, Jr., vividly convey their sheer delight at the variety and abundance of mammalian life. They have brought together a wealth of biological information and applied a biological subspecies concept to the mammals of the eastern United States.