Maize Stress Breeding and Genetics

Combining Ability Analysis for Maize Breeding

Author: Saif ul Malook

Publisher: LAP Lambert Academic Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 120

View: 327

Thirty inbreeding lines of Zea mays were screened in a glasshouse. Eight best performing lines were selected based on nine traits screened to cross with testers. The resulting F1 hybrids were screened in the field for their performance. Root and shoot length ratio, fresh shoot weight, dry root weight, and dry shoot weight were the most important traits to be used as criteria in selecting drought tolerance maize genotypes. Principal component analysis suggested that K55TMS, OH3A54, W187R, A556, WA3748, WM13RA and A545 performed the best under normal and drought conditions. High heritability and genetic advance was found for plant height, 100-grain weight, grain rows per plant and grain yield per plant, suggesting that selection of high yielding maize genotypes is possible through this approach. High specific combining ability of W64SP, A495, A509 and A50-2 suggested pre-screening of inbred lines that the inbred lines may be an efficient approach to develop higher yielding maize hybrids through heterosis breeding under drought.

Quantitative Genetics in Maize Breeding

Author: Arnel R. Hallauer

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 664

View: 939

Maize is used in an endless list of products that are directly or indirectly related to human nutrition and food security. Maize is grown in producer farms, farmers depend on genetically improved cultivars, and maize breeders develop improved maize cultivars for farmers. Nikolai I. Vavilov defined plant breeding as plant evolution directed by man. Among crops, maize is one of the most successful examples for breeder-directed evolution. Maize is a cross-pollinated species with unique and separate male and female organs allowing techniques from both self and cross-pollinated crops to be utilized. As a consequence, a diverse set of breeding methods can be utilized for the development of various maize cultivar types for all economic conditions (e.g., improved populations, inbred lines, and their hybrids for different types of markets). Maize breeding is the science of maize cultivar development. Public investment in maize breeding from 1865 to 1996 was $3 billion (Crosbie et al., 2004) and the return on investment was $260 billion as a consequence of applied maize breeding, even without full understanding of the genetic basis of heterosis. The principles of quantitative genetics have been successfully applied by maize breeders worldwide to adapt and improve germplasm sources of cultivars for very simple traits (e.g. maize flowering) and very complex ones (e.g., grain yield). For instance, genomic efforts have isolated early-maturing genes and QTL for potential MAS but very simple and low cost phenotypic efforts have caused significant and fast genetic progress across genotypes moving elite tropical and late temperate maize northward with minimal investment. Quantitative genetics has allowed the integration of pre-breeding with cultivar development by characterizing populations genetically, adapting them to places never thought of (e.g., tropical to short-seasons), improving them by all sorts of intra- and inter-population recurrent selection methods, extracting lines with more probability of success, and exploiting inbreeding and heterosis. Quantitative genetics in maize breeding has improved the odds of developing outstanding maize cultivars from genetically broad based improved populations such as B73. The inbred-hybrid concept in maize was a public sector invention 100 years ago and it is still considered one of the greatest achievements in plant breeding. Maize hybrids grown by farmers today are still produced following this methodology and there is still no limit to genetic improvement when most genes are targeted in the breeding process. Heterotic effects are unique for each hybrid and exotic genetic materials (e.g., tropical, early maturing) carry useful alleles for complex traits not present in the B73 genome just sequenced while increasing the genetic diversity of U.S. hybrids. Breeding programs based on classical quantitative genetics and selection methods will be the basis for proving theoretical approaches on breeding plans based on molecular markers. Mating designs still offer large sample sizes when compared to QTL approaches and there is still a need to successful integration of these methods. There is a need to increase the genetic diversity of maize hybrids available in the market (e.g., there is a need to increase the number of early maturing testers in the northern U.S.). Public programs can still develop new and genetically diverse products not available in industry. However, public U.S. maize breeding programs have either been discontinued or are eroding because of decreasing state and federal funding toward basic science. Future significant genetic gains in maize are dependent on the incorporation of useful and unique genetic diversity not available in industry (e.g., NDSU EarlyGEM lines). The integration of pre-breeding methods with cultivar development should enhance future breeding efforts to maintain active public breeding programs not only adapting and improving genetically broad-based germplasm but also developing unique products and training the next generation of maize breeders producing research dissertations directly linked to breeding programs. This is especially important in areas where commercial hybrids are not locally bred. More than ever public and private institutions are encouraged to cooperate in order to share breeding rights, research goals, winter nurseries, managed stress environments, and latest technology for the benefit of producing the best possible hybrids for farmers with the least cost. We have the opportunity to link both classical and modern technology for the benefit of breeding in close cooperation with industry without the need for investing in academic labs and time (e.g., industry labs take a week vs months/years in academic labs for the same work). This volume, as part of the Handbook of Plant Breeding series, aims to increase awareness of the relative value and impact of maize breeding for food, feed, and fuel security. Without breeding programs continuously developing improved germplasm, no technology can develop improved cultivars. Quantitative Genetics in Maize Breeding presents principles and data that can be applied to maximize genetic improvement of germplasm and develop superior genotypes in different crops. The topics included should be of interest of graduate students and breeders conducting research not only on breeding and selection methods but also developing pure lines and hybrid cultivars in crop species. This volume is a unique and permanent contribution to breeders, geneticists, students, policy makers, and land-grant institutions still promoting quality research in applied plant breeding as opposed to promoting grant monies and indirect costs at any short-term cost. The book is dedicated to those who envision the development of the next generation of cultivars with less need of water and inputs, with better nutrition; and with higher percentages of exotic germplasm as well as those that pursue independent research goals before searching for funding. Scientists are encouraged to use all possible breeding methodologies available (e.g., transgenics, classical breeding, MAS, and all possible combinations could be used with specific sound long and short-term goals on mind) once germplasm is chosen making wise decisions with proven and scientifically sound technologies for assisting current breeding efforts depending on the particular trait under selection. Arnel R. Hallauer is C. F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor in Agriculture (Emeritus) at Iowa State University (ISU). Dr. Hallauer has led maize-breeding research for mid-season maturity at ISU since 1958. His work has had a worldwide impact on plant-breeding programs, industry, and students and was named a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Hallauer is a native of Kansas, USA. José B. Miranda Filho is full-professor in the Department of Genetics, Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz - University of São Paulo located at Piracicaba, Brazil. His research interests have emphasized development of quantitative genetic theory and its application to maize breeding. Miranda Filho is native of Pirassununga, São Paulo, Brazil. M.J. Carena is professor of plant sciences at North Dakota State University (NDSU). Dr. Carena has led maize-breeding research for short-season maturity at NDSU since 1999. This program is currently one the of the few public U.S. programs left integrating pre-breeding with cultivar development and training in applied maize breeding. He teaches Quantitative Genetics and Crop Breeding Techniques at NDSU. Carena is a native of Buenos Aires, Argentina. http://www.ag.ndsu.nodak.edu/plantsci/faculty/Carena.htm

Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Maize

Author: Ramakrishna Wusirika

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 310

View: 769

Sequencing of the maize genome has opened up new opportunities in maize breeding, genetics and genomics research. This book highlights modern trends in development of hybrids, analysis of genetic diversity, molecular breeding, comparative and functional genomics, epigenomicsand proteomics in maize. The use of maize in biofuels, phytoremediation and pharmaceuticals is also highlighted. Current research trends, future research directions and challenges are discussed by a panel of experts from all over the world.

Molecular Plant Abiotic Stress

Biology and Biotechnology

Author: Aryadeep Roychoudhury

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 480

View: 223

A close examination of current research on abiotic stresses in various plant species The unpredictable environmental stress conditions associated with climate change are significant challenges to global food security, crop productivity, and agricultural sustainability. Rapid population growth and diminishing resources necessitate the development of crops that can adapt to environmental extremities. Although significant advancements have been made in developing plants through improved crop breeding practices and genetic manipulation, further research is necessary to understand how genes and metabolites for stress tolerance are modulated, and how cross-talk and regulators can be tuned to achieve stress tolerance. Molecular Plant Abiotic Stress: Biology and Biotechnology is an extensive investigation of the various forms of abiotic stresses encountered in plants, and susceptibility or tolerance mechanisms found in different plant species. In-depth examination of morphological, anatomical, biochemical, molecular and gene expression levels enables plant scientists to identify the different pathways and signaling cascades involved in stress response. This timely book: Covers a wide range of abiotic stresses in multiple plant species Provides researchers and scientists with transgenic strategies to overcome stress tolerances in several plant species Compiles the most recent research and up-to-date data on stress tolerance Examines both selective breeding and genetic engineering approaches to improving plant stress tolerances Written and edited by prominent scientists and researchers from across the globe Molecular Plant Abiotic Stress: Biology and Biotechnology is a valuable source of information for students, academics, scientists, researchers, and industry professionals in fields including agriculture, botany, molecular biology, biochemistry and biotechnology, and plant physiology.

Advances in Molecular Breeding Toward Drought and Salt Tolerant Crops

Author: Matthew A. Jenks

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 817

View: 279

With near-comprehensive coverage of new advances in crop breeding for drought and salinity stress tolerance, this timely work seeks to integrate the most recent findings about key biological determinants of plant stress tolerance with modern crop improvement strategies. This volume is unique because is provides exceptionally wide coverage of current knowledge and expertise being applied in drought and salt tolerance research.

Maize Breeding and Genetics

Author: David B. Walden

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Corn

Page: 794

View: 236

History; Evolution; Breeding; Diseases and insects; Endosperm; Tissue; Gene action; Cytogenetics.

Molecular Breeding for Abiotic Stresses in Maize (Zea Mays L.)

Author: Asima Gazal

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page:

View: 330

Abiotic constraints resulting from climate changes have widespread yield reducing effects on all field crops and therefore should receive high priority for crop breeding research. Conventional breeding has progressed a lot in building tolerant genotypes but abiotic stress tolerance breeding is limited by the complex nature of abiotic stress intensity, frequency, duration and timing, linkage drag of undesirable traits/genes with desirable traits; and transfer of favorable genes/alleles from diverse plant genetic resources limited by gene pool barriers giving molecular breeding a good option for breeding plant genotypes that can thrive in stress environments. Molecular breeding (MB) approaches viz., marker-assisted selection (MAS), marker-assisted backcrossing breeding (MABB), marker assisted recurrent selection (MARS) and genomic selection (GS) or genome wide selection (GWS) offer opportunities for plant breeders to develop high yielding maize cultivars with resilience to diseases in less time duration precisely. For complex traits (mainly abiotic stresses) where multiple QTLs control the expression, new strategies like marker assisted recurrent selection (MARS) and genomic selection (GS) are employed to increase precision and to reduce cost of phenotyping and time duration with disease resilience. This review discusses recent developments in molecular breeding for developing and improving abiotic stress resilience in field crops.

Molecular Breeding in Wheat, Maize and Sorghum

Strategies for Improving Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Yield

Author: Mohammad Anwar Hossain

Publisher: Cab International

ISBN:

Category: Corn

Page: 552

View: 112

"This book covers the latest understanding of molecular and genetic bases of abiotic stress tolerance and yield improvement of wheat, maize and sorghum, to develop strategies for improved stress tolerance and enhanced crop productivity"--

Heat Stress Tolerance in Plants

Physiological, Molecular and Genetic Perspectives

Author: Shabir H. Wani

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 934

Demystifies the genetic, biochemical, physiological, and molecular mechanisms underlying heat stress tolerance in plants Heat stress—when high temperatures cause irreversible damage to plant function or development—severely impairs the growth and yield of agriculturally important crops. As the global population mounts and temperatures continue to rise, it is crucial to understand the biochemical, physiological, and molecular mechanisms of thermotolerance to develop ‘climate-smart’ crops. Heat Stress Tolerance in Plants provides a holistic, cross-disciplinary survey of the latest science in this important field. Presenting contributions from an international team of plant scientists and researchers, this text examines heat stress, its impact on crop plants, and various mechanisms to modulate tolerance levels. Topics include recent advances in molecular genetic approaches to increasing heat tolerance, the potential role of biochemical and molecular markers in screening germplasm for thermotolerance, and the use of next-generation sequencing to unravel the novel genes associated with defense and metabolite pathways. This insightful book: Places contemporary research on heat stress in plants within the context of global climate change and population growth Includes diverse analyses from physiological, biochemical, molecular, and genetic perspectives Explores various approaches to increasing heat tolerance in crops of high commercial value, such as cotton Discusses the applications of plant genomics in the development of thermotolerant ‘designer crops’ An important contribution to the field, Heat Stress Tolerance in Plants is an invaluable resource for scientists, academics, students, and researchers working in fields of pulse crop biochemistry, physiology, genetics, breeding, and biotechnology.

Translational Genomics for Crop Breeding

Volume 1 - Biotic Stress

Author: Rajeev Varshney

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 368

View: 889

Genomic Applications for Crop Breeding: Biotic Stress is the first of two volumes looking at the latest advances in genomic applications to crop breeding. This volume focuses on genomic-assisted advances for improving economically important crops against biotic stressors, such as viruses, fungi, nematodes, and bacteria. Looking at key advances in crops such as rice, barley, wheat, and potato amongst others, Genomic Applications for Crop Breeding: Biotic Stress will be an essential reference for crop scientists, geneticists, breeders, industry personnel and advanced students in the field.

Plant Breeding for Abiotic Stress Tolerance

Author: Roberto Fritsche-Neto

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 176

View: 883

The rapid population growth and the increase in the per capita income, especially in the group of emerging countries referred to as BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) has created huge pressure for the expansion of the agricultural growing area and the crop yields to meet the rising demand. As a result, many areas that have been considered marginal for growing crops, due to their low fertility, drought, salinity, and many other abiotic stresses, have now been incorporated in the production system. Additionally, climate change has brought new challenges to agriculture to produce food, feed, fiber and biofuels. To cope with these new challenges, many plant breeding programs have reoriented their breeding scope to stress tolerance in the last years. The authors of this book have collected the most recent advances and discoveries applied to breeding for abiotic stresses in this book, starting with new physiological concepts and breeding methods, and moving on to discuss modern molecular biological approaches geared to the development of improved cultivars tolerant to most sorts of abiotic stress. Written in an easy to understand style, this book is an excellent reference work for students, scientists and farmers interested in learning how to breed for abiotic stresses scenarios, presenting the state-of-the-art in plant stresses and allowing the reader to develop a greater understanding of the basic mechanisms of tolerance to abiotic stresses and how to breed for them.

Drought Stress in Maize (Zea mays L.)

Effects, Resistance Mechanisms, Global Achievements and Biological Strategies for Improvement

Author: Muhammad Aslam

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 74

View: 435

This book focuses on early germination, one of maize germplasm most important strategies for adapting to drought-induced stress. Some genotypes have the ability to adapt by either reducing water losses or by increasing water uptake. Drought tolerance is also an adaptive strategy that enables crop plants to maintain their normal physiological processes and deliver higher economical yield despite drought stress. Several processes are involved in conferring drought tolerance in maize: the accumulation of osmolytes or antioxidants, plant growth regulators, stress proteins and water channel proteins, transcription factors and signal transduction pathways. Drought is one of the most detrimental forms of abiotic stress around the world and seriously limits the productivity of agricultural crops. Maize, one of the leading cereal crops in the world, is sensitive to drought stress. Maize harvests are affected by drought stress at different growth stages in different regions. Numerous events in the life of maize crops can be affected by drought stress: germination potential, seedling growth, seedling stand establishment, overall growth and development, pollen and silk development, anthesis silking interval, pollination, and embryo, endosperm and kernel development. Though every maize genotype has the ability to avoid or withstand drought stress, there is a concrete need to improve the level of adaptability to drought stress to address the global issue of food security. The most common biological strategies for improving drought stress resistance include screening available maize germplasm for drought tolerance, conventional breeding strategies, and marker-assisted and genomic-assisted breeding and development of transgenic maize. As a comprehensive understanding of the effects of drought stress, adaptive strategies and potential breeding tools is the prerequisite for any sound breeding plan, this brief addresses these aspects.

Plant Breeding for Biotic Stress Resistance

Author: Roberto Fritsche-Neto

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 168

View: 598

This book collects the latest advances and discoveries concerning breeding for biotic stresses, and biotic challenges to agriculture and food production. Reviews plant stresses caused by microorganisms, weeds and insects, and discusses how to breed for them.

PLANT BREEDING: Classical to Modern

Author: P. M. Priyadarshan

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 570

View: 962

This book offers a detailed overview of both conventional and modern approaches to plant breeding. In 25 chapters, it explores various aspects of conventional and modern means of plant breeding, including: history, objective, activities, centres of origin, plant introduction, reproduction, incompatibility, sterility, biometrics, selection, hybridization, methods of breeding both self- and cross- pollinated crops, heterosis, synthetic varieties, induced mutations and polyploidy, distant hybridization, quality breeding, ideotype breeding, resistance breeding, breeding for stress resistance, G x E interactions, tissue culture, genetic engineering, molecular breeding, genomics, gene action and varietal release. The book’s content addresses the needs of students worldwide. Modern methods like molecular breeding and genomics are dealt with extensively so as to provide a firm foundation and equip readers to read further advanced books. Each chapter discusses the respective subject as comprehensively as possible, and includes a section on further reading at the end. Info-boxes highlight the latest advances, and care has been taken to include nearly all topics required under the curricula of MS programs. As such, the book provides a much-needed reference guide for MS students around the globe.

Translational Genomics for Crop Breeding

Improvement for Abiotic Stress, Quality and Yield Improvement

Author: Rajeev Varshney

Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 260

View: 929

Genomic Applications for Crop Breeding: Abiotic Stress, Quality and Yield Improvement is the second of two volumes looking at the latest advances in genomic applications to crop breeding. This volume focuses on advances improving crop resistance to abiotic stresses such as extreme heat, drought, flooding as well as advances made in quality and yield improvement. Chapters examine advances in such key crops as rice, maize, and sugarcane, among others. Genomic Applications for Crop Breeding: Abiotic Stress, Quality and Yield Improvement complements the earlier volume on biotic stressors and will be an essential purchase for those interested in crop science and food production.

Abiotic Stresses

Plant Resistance Through Breeding and Molecular Approaches

Author: M. Ashraf

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 725

View: 466

Gain a better understanding of the genetic and physiological bases of stress response and stress tolerance as part of crop improvement programs Abiotic Stresses: Plant Resistance Through Breeding and Molecular Approaches explores innovative methods for breeding new varieties of major crops with resistance to environmental stresses that limit crop production worldwide. Experts provide you with basic principles and techniques of plant breeding as well as work done in relation to improving resistance in specific important world food crops. This book supplies extensive bibliographies at the end of each chapter, as well as tables and figures that illustrate the research findings. Abiotic Stresses is divided into two sections. In the first section, you will find: the general principles of breeding crops for stress resistance genetic engineering and molecular biology procedures for crop improvement for stress environments data on genome mapping and its implications for improving stress resistance in plants information about breeding for resistance/tolerance to salinity, drought, flooding, metals, low nutrient availability, high/low temperatures The second section of this timely resource focuses on the efforts of acknowledged specialists who concentrated their efforts on important individual crops, such as: wheat barley rice maize oilseed crops cotton tomato This book fills a niche and interface in the available literature as it deals with all of the major stresses from a perspective of crop breeding, covering the latest advances in molecular breeding technology. Abiotic Stresses will help scientists and academics in botany, plant breeding, plant environmental stress studies, agriculture, and horticulture modify and improve breeding programs globally.

Quantitative Genetics, Genomics and Plant Breeding, 2nd Edition

Author: Manjit S. Kang

Publisher: CABI

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 431

View: 371

This book presents state-of-the-art, authoritative chapters on contemporary issues in the broad areas of quantitative genetics, genomics and plant breeding. Section 1 (Chapters 2 to 12) emphasizes the application of genomics, and genome and epigenome editing techniques, in plant breeding; bioinformatics; quantitative trait loci mapping; and the latest approaches of examining and exploiting genotype-environment interactions. Section 2 (Chapters 13 to 20) represents the intersection of breeding, genetics and genomics. This section describes the use of cutting-edge molecular breeding and quantitative genetics techniques in wheat, rice, maize, root and tuber crops and pearl millet. Overall, the book focuses on using genomic information to help evaluate traits that can combat biotic/abiotic stresses, genome-wide association mapping, high-throughput genotyping/phenotyping, biofortification, use of big data, orphan crops, and gene editing techniques. The examples featured are taken from across crop science research and cover a wide geographical base.

Plant Breeding For Stress Environments

Author: Abraham Blum

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 231

View: 833

This publication opens with the inevitable introduction, moves on to the present traditional approach to breeding for yield stability, and then enumerates a detailed discussion of the physiological approach to breeding for resistance to specific stresses. Not all environmental stresses are covered, omitting those for which little can be said today on practical breeding solutions.